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On The Record
Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Special WYPR Coronavirus Coverage

Produced by Maureen Harvie and Melissa Gerr. Theme music created by Jon Ehrens. Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Latest Episodes
  • As Jessica Anya Blau’s latest novel starts, Mary Jane has just turned 14. She’s starting a summer job as a nanny of an endearing five-year-old, just a short walk from her own traditional home in Baltimore’s Roland Park. Mary Jane’s conservative parents think it’s great their daughter will be workin for a doctor. They don’t yet know he’s a psychiatrist who has cleared his summer schedule to treat a recovering drug addict who’s a rock star … and whose movie-star wife will also spend the summer.
  • The pandemic is distributing financial and other stresses, like its health damages--chaotically. They’re colliding on people who never before reached out for mental-health support but are now seeking help.
  • Here’s a Mother's Day Stoop Story from Debbie Page, who reminds us: there is no instruction book for parenting.
  • Two decades ago, just a few months shy of high school graduation, Sherise Holden learned she was pregnant. Today, Holden leads the nonprofit SheRises, which connects teen moms to resources and mentors. We hear about love and perseverance from Sherise and her daughter, Autumn.
  • Child care is an essential service, but the pandemic rocked the industry: capacity was restricted and cleaning costs soared.We speak with Laura Weeldreyer of the nonprofit Maryland Family Network, and ask what President Biden’s "American Families Plan" would mean for the industry. Then, Christina Peusch, who leads the Maryland State Child Care Association, and Imani-Angela Rose, co-owner of a center in Northwest Baltimore, detail hurdles facing providers.
  • Only a small number of Marylanders who have received their first COVID-19 vaccine shot have skipped their second dose, less than 4 percent.But Dr. William Moss, who leads the International Vaccine Access Center at the Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says it’s a risky move. He talks about the factors behind vaccine drop-off.Then, the math that signals the end of the pandemic. UMBC health economist Zoë McLaren gives us a lesson in exponential decay. Read her New York Times piece, "The Math That Explains the End of the Pandemic."
  • It’s been so long, you may not remember them. They’ve been living, silently and unseen, underground since 2004. Now they’re back! The Brood X Cicadas are expected in the millions this month -- We hear all about it from ‘the bug guy’ Mike Raupp, Professor Emeritus of Entomology and Extension Specialist at The University of Maryland. Plus Patsy Helmetag and Kita Helmetag Murdock, the authors of ‘Cecily Cicada’ talk about how the children’s book has helped alleviate fear of the phenomenon for kids and adults alike.
  • With more availability of COVID-19 vaccines, the end of the pandemic may be in sight. But millions of people who were infected continue to battle lasting complications.Hopkins epidemiologist Priya Duggal tells of a new survey collecting data about COVID symptoms and of genetic research into why some people are vulnerable to long COVID. Check out the Johns Hopkins Long COVID Study.And we hear from Chimére Smith, who has spent more than a year navigating the painful reality of long haul COVID.
  • This weekend the Baltimore Black Arts and Entertainment District will host the ‘Baltimore Black Artist Fair’ to shore up support especially for Black creatives in the community. We hear about it from the district’s executive director, spoken-word artist Lady Brion. And then Olu Woods, program director of DewMore Baltimore talks about the Youth Poetry Grand Slam that is part of the festival.
  • Here is a Stoop Story from Sheri Booker about what not to do when your job is driving for a funeral home. Booker is the author of Nine Years Under: Coming of Age in an Inner-City Funeral Home.You can hear her story and others at Stoopstorytelling.com and on the Stoop podcast.