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Special Coverage: Coronavirus In Maryland And Beyond

Track the number of cases, find out what the state and local governments are doing to provide testing and slow COVID-19's spread, and more

WYPR News

Andrew Harnick / Associated Press

As Governor Larry Hogan’s press conference was getting underway Monday, Miriam Doyle, a clinical social worker at Clitfton T. Perkins Psychiatric Hospital in Howard County for three years, was trying to listen for the updates she says her patients are desperate for.

She, her co-workers, and her patients had just learned about the outbreak in their hospital, where eight patients and a staff member had tested positive for Covid-19, and Doyle wanted to hear what the governor had to tell them. But her attention was diverted.

Even before the coronavirus pandemic, Baltimore’s homeless was one of the city’s most vulnerable populations. It is difficult for them to get health care and they are more likely to have chronic health problems.

Now, officials and volunteers are mobilizing to try to protect the homeless from being ravaged by the virus.

Melissa Gerr / WYPR

Gov. Larry Hogan has ordered all Maryland residents to stay home beginning at 8 p.m. Monday. Disobeying the order is a misdemeanor and could mean up to a year in jail, a fine of up to $5,000, or both.

Rachel Baye

  

Baltimore County gave away more than 1,000 boxes of groceries this weekend, part of an effort to help residents who are out of work, including the thousands who have filed unemployment claims since mid-March.

John Lee

Starting Monday, teachers throughout Maryland will be getting an education on how to do their jobs in the new reality of online learning.

The head of the teachers union in Baltimore County said her members are anxious about what is a very uncertain time, as school administrators react to the coronavirus pandemic.

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An evening roundup of WYPR's latest reporting on Maryland's COVID-19 response, a summary of essential state and local updates, and a forum for locals who want to share.

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WYPR, NPR, AND REGIONAL NEWS

When news broke of an epidemic in Wuhan, China, German scientist Christian Drosten was soon in great demand.

Drosten is one of the world's leading experts on coronaviruses, and, back in 2003, he and a colleague were the first Western scientists to discover SARS after China hid information about that outbreak.

The stock market has never seen a month like March. The Dow notched losses and gains of 1,000 points to as many as 3,000 points in a day in reaction to the coronavirus pandemic and its economic toll.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average has recovered from recent lows, but it's still down nearly 12% this month.

And the blue chip index is 24% below its recent peak in February. At its low on March 23, it was down a staggering 38% from the record high.

What will happen when COVID-19 hits refugee camps?

White House memoirs generally fall into two categories: Me, I was there! and Hey, it wasn't my fault!

ABC News Chief Washington Correspondent Jonathan Karl's new book, Front Row at the Trump Show, is in the former.

Karl's book tells of how he first met Trump when he was working as a New York Post reporter: "I was a cub reporter for a New York tabloid. He was a flamboyant real estate developer with a scandalous personal life." (To quote Avril Lavigne, "Can I make it any more obvious?")

Eleven veterans have died at a soldiers' home in Holyoke, Mass., where a COVID-19 outbreak is now threatening even more residents and staff. At least five of the people who died have tested positive for COVID-19; other tests are still pending in the case, which Gov. Charlie Baker calls "a shuddering loss for us all."

An additional 11 veterans and five staff members have also tested positive, raising the facility's overall total to more than 20 confirmed cases. More tests are under way to determine the scope of exposure to the coronavirus.

Child care providers around the country have been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, with many facing closure even as others struggle to stay open.

At least 12 states have shuttered all child care except for essential workers, according to The Hunt Institute, an education nonprofit. In California, the decision is up to each provider, who must balance the needs of families with the health and safety of workers and children.

Andrew Harnick / Associated Press

As Governor Larry Hogan’s press conference was getting underway Monday, Miriam Doyle, a clinical social worker at Clitfton T. Perkins Psychiatric Hospital in Howard County for three years, was trying to listen for the updates she says her patients are desperate for.

She, her co-workers, and her patients had just learned about the outbreak in their hospital, where eight patients and a staff member had tested positive for Covid-19, and Doyle wanted to hear what the governor had to tell them. But her attention was diverted.

Editor's note: NPR will be publishing stories from this investigative series in the weeks ahead, even as we focus our current coverage on the coronavirus pandemic. But here's a look at some of our key findings. You can watch the full documentary film from this investigation on the PBS series Frontline.

With The 'I Am' Books, You Are A Hero Too

5 hours ago

Firstly, let me say this column started out quite differently. You see, I began writing it more than a week ago, and since then life has certainly changed in my house, as I am sure it has in yours. Frankly, things have changed so much, I wasn't sure I would even get this column written, what with spring break and now school closures (I'm writing it in 10-minute increments, as it is).

Michelle Kuppersmith feels great, works full time and exercises three to four times a week. So she was surprised when a routine blood test found that her body was making too many platelets, which help control bleeding.

Kuppersmith's doctor suspected the 32-year-old Manhattanite had a rare blood disorder called essential thrombocythemia, which can lead to blood clots, strokes and, in rare cases, leukemia.

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