WYPR | Your NPR News Station

WYPR News

Mary Rose Madden

Since two women sued the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore County and others earlier this month for allegedly failing to properly investigate their reports of sexual assault, others have come forward with similar complaints.

Thursday, students crowded into an auditorium on campus to tell UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski and other college administrators about the problems they’ve had trying to report sexual assaults.

They lined up in the aisles for their chance at the microphone to open up about what they said were horrifying events in their life.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Federal prosecutors in Maryland indicted three men today on charges of bilking more than 400 investors of $364 million in an elaborate Ponzi scheme. The victims were small business owners, professional athletes, doctors and lawyers in Maryland and throughout the nation.

John Lee

A new study finds it will take up to about $630 million for Baltimore County to fix overcrowding in its high schools. 

 

There are three proposals that address both crowded schools and building conditions.

 

 

A new Goucher Poll released Tuesday has Gov. Larry Hogan leading Democratic challenger Ben Jealous by 22 points, despite high levels of support in Maryland for progressive policies.

Two women are suing the University of Maryland Baltimore County, the Baltimore County Police, and the Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Office – among others – for allegedly failing to investigate their reports of rape.

In the complaint, filed Sept. 10 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the women, former students, allege they were raped in separate incidents in 2015 and 2017, but that officials at the university failed to take them seriously and that the police classified their reports as "unfounded."

More News

Sign up to receive WYPR emails.

Get the weeks lineup, catch up on your favorite programs or news stories that you missed plus, win fabulous prizes.

Out of the Blocks

Strong Women

Stories from a mixed-martial-arts fighter, the manager of a diner, a trainer of Doberman Pinschers, a child-abuse survivor, a fashion entrepreneur, a recovering drug addict, a performance artist, a mom who avoided suicide, and the woman who convinced Baltimore to build a skate park.

Read More

WYPR AND NPR NEWS

Here’s a Stoop Story from Elliot Wagenheim about finding the motivation to get up off the recliner. You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Young people around the country are among those joining the debate over Christine Blasey Ford's accusation of sexual assault against Judge Brett Kavanaugh in 1982, when both were teenagers.

What are teens learning from all this? And how should adults be handling this conversation?

One night during the summer of 2017, a teenager named Francesca in Virginia was assaulted by a classmate: "I was pinned down and he fondled my breasts and sexually assaulted me." We're only using her first name because she's 15 years old.

The Cleveland Browns made a rare visit to the win column Thursday night, ending a streak of frustration and futility by beating another NFL team for the first time since Christmas Eve 2016. The win set off celebrations – including a promotion campaign that had offered free beer if the team won a game in 2018.

Kul Chandra Gautam was born in a rural village with no electricity or running water, no doctors and schools. The nearest town with a market was a five-day walk away.

He left home at age 7 to study — and study he did. He was one of the first people in the world to learn English from a Peace Corps volunteer, and his outstanding grades eventually won him a full scholarship to Dartmouth.

But getting there wasn't easy.

The shuttering of saloons, the death of distilleries. For 13 years, Prohibition was the law of the land--banning the manufacture, sale, and distribution of “intoxicating liquors.” But Maryland’s approach to enforcement was “hands off.”

Historian Michael T. Walsh details local resistance in his book, “Baltimore Prohibition: Wet and Dry in the Free State.”

He will be speaking tomorrow at B.C. Brewery from 1-3 PM, at 10950 Gilroy Road in Hunt Valley.

If, on a recent Wednesday morning, you had happened to find yourself in the cavernous lobby of Pyongyang's Yanggakdo Hotel, you might have witnessed the following exchange, between a pleasant-looking North Korean man and an exasperated-looking American news team.

"You must be tired," says Mr. Kim. "You will want to rest at the hotel this morning."

Nope, we're good. Ready when you are.

"Well, I am tired."

Russia's influence campaign on Twitter pushed pro-gun and pro-National Rifle Association messages during the 2016 election and beyond — a rare example of consistency in a scheme that mostly sought to play up extremes on the left and right.

On every issue, from race to health care, women's rights to police brutality, gay marriage to global warming, accounts associated with the Internet Research Agency sought to amplify controversy by playing up conflict.

Russian social media agitators who pushed pro-gun messages in the United States sometimes copied the language of the National Rifle Association. And sometimes, the NRA copied them.

What isn't clear is whether there was any relationship between the social media users or whether the duplication was done without the other's awareness, part of the broader tide of advocacy about gun rights.

What is clear is that, at times, the Russians followed so closely behind the American gun rights group that it duplicated its content word for word.

It's been a tough couple of years for the business of voting.

There's the state that discovered a Russian oligarch now finances the company that hosts its voting data.

Then there's the company that manufactures and services voter registration software in eight states that found itself hacked by Russian operatives leading up to the 2016 presidential election.

And then there's the largest voting machine company in the country, which initially denied and then admitted it had installed software on its systems considered by experts to be extremely vulnerable to hacking.

Officials in Tanzania say the death toll from a ferry sinking on Lake Victoria has risen to at least 100 people, but with hundreds of passengers thought to have been on board, the toll is expected to rise.

John Mongella, commissioner for the Mwanza region, initially put the number of dead at 86, but Tanzania's state radio TBC said more than 100 bodies had been found so far.

Pages