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Fighting For The Falls: Talking Trash

“You can’t have a clean Inner Harbor without a clean Jones Falls."

WYPR News

Rachel Baye

  

Maryland may join the growing list of states that get most of their electricity from renewable sources. Legislation state lawmakers plan to take up when they return to Annapolis next month would require Maryland to hit that goal by the year 2030.

Tradepoint Atlantic

The Baltimore County Council is weighing whether to use tax money to help the developer of the old Bethlehem Steel site in Sparrows Point.  At a hearing Tuesday, council members appeared receptive to Tradepoint Atlantic’s request for up to $78 million.

 

 

John Lee

Once a month, Barbara Johnson makes her way to the banks of the Jones Falls.

 

Johnson, a water quality scientist with Blue Water Baltimore, tests the water at more than a dozen sites along the falls and its tributaries, from Stevenson Village near its headwaters in rural Baltimore County, to just where the falls goes into underground tunnels near the Howard Street Bridge in the city.

 

 

John Lee

Thousands of people make their way on the Jones Falls Expressway each day. But running beneath the JFX, there’s the other Jones Falls, the waterway people talk about usually only when it floods, or is flooded with raw sewage, or both. Officials are grappling with how to control and improve the Jones Falls as it makes its way from Baltimore County to the Inner Harbor.

 

 

Lauren Watley, Baltimore County Government

Johnny Olszewski Jr. was sworn into office Monday as Baltimore County Executive. Now he’s faced with the possibility he may need to raise taxes, cut the county budget or both.

 

This comes as Olszewski is promising a closer working relationship with the council.

 

 

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Out of the Blocks

all photos by Wendel Patrick

Pennsylvania Avenue, part 1: Resurrection Intersection

In 2015, circling helicopter footage showed West Baltimore in chaos. In the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, buildings burned, protesters and looters alike filled the streets, and entire neighborhoods were cordoned off by armored police and the National Guard. Today, the riot police are gone, and so is the media frenzy, but the neighborhood remains, scarred by the story of what happened. Local activist Ray Kelly says, “To be frank, the unrest started long before the riots, and the unrest is still happening today.” In this episode, we meet Mr. Kelly, along with his neighbors on a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue where the community is determined to redefine itself in the aftermath of a narrative shaped by outsiders.

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