On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Elvert Barnes / Flickr

A city task force is proposing an overhaul in how Baltimore handles citizen complaints of misconduct by police officers. The consent decree between Baltimore and the US Department of Justice tasked the Community Oversight Task Force with studying ways to hold police accountable. In its 74-page report, the task force urges disbanding the current Civilian Review Board and creating two new oversight panels. We hear from task force member Catalina Bryd and chair Ray Kelly.

A few months after the September 11th attacks, Anthony Moll did what a lot of teenagers did: raised his hand and took an oath to the U.S. army. For a working-class kid in a stagnant city, the army meant escape. For a bisexual man with pink hair, the army at that time also meant “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.” His new memoir is titled, "Out of Step".

Anthony Moll will speak about "Out of Step," as part of the Writers LIVE series, tomorrow night, 6:30 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. More detail here.

Melissa Gerr

It was 289 years ago that the Maryland General Assembly issued Baltimore a town charter -- actually, voted out on July 30, 1729 … but Charm City is celebrating tonight with a party put on by Live Baltimore.

The little settlement on the Patapsco was named for Cecil Calvert, second Baron Baltimore, first proprietor of the Maryland colony. Calvert never visited his colony. But even if he had, it’s safe to say neither he nor any of the succeeding Barons Baltimore would recognize what the city has become. What hopes do those who live here now hold for Baltimore? We asked nearly two dozen denizens -- From Mayor Catherine Pugh ... to film director and author John Waters -- to make a wish and tell us what they most desire for Charm City, on the threshold of its 289th year.

Jesus Perez tells his Stoop story about adjusting to life in Baltimore after his family left Mexico and fighting for immigrant’s rights in the United States. You can hear his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Ivy Bookshop

African-Americans living free in Baltimore before the Civil War were constantly testing whether the law and courts saw them as citizens, with rights to be respected. In her new book, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America, Johns Hopkins Professor Martha Jones argues the free blacks of Baltimore shaped the idea of birthright citizenship that made it into the U.S. constitution and that their struggle still carries meaning for today’s immigrants.

Phillip Capper / Flickr via Creative Commons

More than seven thousand languages are spoken around the globe, and researchers have picked up on a curious fact: as you move from the Earth’s poles toward the equator, you hear more languages. Why do humans speak so many languages? And why so many more in the tropics? Do languages diversify the way animal species do?

Dr. Michael Gavin, an ecologist in Colorado State University’s Department of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources, is looking for answers on islands in the South Pacific.

This program originally aired August 15, 2017.

Kara Mae Harris

There’s much more to Maryland cuisine than crabcakes and Old Bay. Have you tasted Peanut Pickle Sandwiches and Baltimore Caramels? Or sipped tomato Wine? Kara Mae Harris has. The Food enthusiast and recipe sleuth is painstakingly preserving Maryland’s culinary heritage across dozens of decades ... one recipe at a time. Harris tests favorites and reports back on her blog, ‘Old Line Plate.’ She’s also created a searchable database of more than 30-thousand recipes and has made some surprising discoveries.

2MADEIRA / Flickr via Creative Commons

Former U.S.A. gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar abused hundreds of athletes, and competitors in other sports are raising alarms about more abuse at the hands of coaches, as well as cover-ups of inappropriate or illegal behavior.

We speak with filmmaker Jill Yesko about her forthcoming web-series on abuse in Olympic athletics, "Broken Trust".

And we hear from Eva Rodansky, a speedskater who represented the US on the national circuit. She describes the difficulty of pressing officials to investigate claims. Then, Olympic swimmer Nancy Hogshead Makar, now a lawyer and CEO of Champion Women, details new reforms aimed at protecting athletes.

More information on exposing abuse in Olympic athletics below:
Nancy Hogshead-Makar: #MeToo shows need for tighter rules in club and Olympic sports 
E
x-U.S. athlete tells Speed Skating Canada of head coach's alleged sexual relationships with skaters
Explosive Report Says USA Swimming Covered Up Hundreds Of Sexual Abuse Cases
4 Accusers Sue Taekwondo Champion Brothers For Alleged Sexual Abuse
U.S. Center for SafeSport

Baltimore Department of Planning

Average citizens--the very people affected by city zoning and development decisions --are often in the dark about how to take part in the discussions that shape their neighborhoods. To help residents have a voice at the table, The Department of Planning is launching the Baltimore Planning Academy. We talk with Stephanie Smith, Assistant Director for ‘Equity, Engagement and Communications … and City Planner Martin French to learn why informed engagement is important.

That was Towanda Carter’s Stoop Story about how it’s possible to rise to life’s challenges when people expect the best of you. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Once you leave the supportive embrace of school, pursuing music can pose hurdles. Whether it’s playing an instrument or singing, how do you make time for rehearsals? Should you take lessons? And if you do, how to find the right teacher? How do you avoid physical strains and cope with performance nerves? Yet thousands of adults pursue it because they love it.

Baltimore native Amy Nathan surveyed hundreds for her new book, Making Time for Making Music. We hear from musicians Max Weiss, Baltimore Magazine editor, and Liz Sogge, a data specialist for Johns Hopkins.

Forgetting someone’s name, getting caught with spinach in your teeth. We all experience cringe worthy moments, but some people seem never to grow out of their awkward teenage years. Psychologist Ty Tashiro tells us why these mishaps happen and why some people are more awkward than others. His book is called Awkward: The Science of Why We’re Socially Awkward and Why That’s Awesome. Tashiro says that awkward behavior can have its advantages. Original airdate 7.25.17

Photograph by Mary Garrity, restored by Adam Cuerden / Wikimedia Commons

The pioneering investigative reporter and anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells was born into slavery in Mississippi 156 years ago. Her tenacity and loyalty to the truth remain a standard for all journalists. We ask her great granddaughter Michelle Duster about Wells’ legacy.

Click here for ticket information for the Q&A and cocktail reception tonight at Ida B's Table. Read more information about the Ida B. Wells Memorial Foundation.

Plus, Lucy Dalglish, journalism dean at the University of Maryland, tells of a scholarship honoring the victims of the Capital Gazette shooting. More information about the Capital Gazette Memorial Scholarship Fund here. You can submit stories here to remember alumni Gerald Fischman and John McNamara and faculty member Rob Hiaasen.

Garrett Berberich

When summer vacation comes to an end, and kids return to the classroom, many find they’ve fallen behind. What can be done to prevent summer learning loss?

The Summer Arts and Learning Academy is a free camp for elementary school students run by Baltimore City Schools and Young Audiences of Maryland. We hear from Stacie Sanders Evans, head of Young Audiences of Maryland, who says pairing teachers and artists can halt summer slide and make math and reading fun. And from Lara Ohanian, Director of Differentiated Learning at Baltimore City Public Schools.

Click here for information on SummerREADS. Click here for a list of other drop-in programs for Baltimore students.

Plus, slime and other do-it-yourself experiments at the Maryland Science Center. Samantha Blau, External Programs Manager at the Maryland Science Center, describes ways to encourage scientific exploration.

Check out the calendar of events at the MD Science Center here. Click here for more "Science at Home" activities.

National Great Blacks in Wax Museum

The National Great Blacks in Wax Museum is filled with dozens of life-size, lifelike wax figures that illustrate the accomplishments of African American notables--historical and contemporary. Saturday, July 14, history will extend beyond the museum walls for the Voices of History street fair. Museum co-founder and director, Dr. Joanne Martin gives us highlights of the fair, and discusses why she and her late husband started the museum 35 years ago.

Shindana Cooper tells her Stoop Story about an ill-fated cruise with the Middle Passage Monument Project. You can hear her story and others at stoop storytelling dot com.

So many inspiring activities this weekend! If drumlines get your blood pumping, don’t miss the Baltimore Christian Warriors 30th Anniversary. They’re hosting the Tri-state Drumline Competition and Showcase tomorrow at Baltimore City Community College, 2901 Liberty Heights Avenue. It starts at noon, tickets at the door.

And at the Community College of Baltimore County in Catonsville, you can attend the Maryland Humanities 2018 Chautauqua, titled: ‘Seeking Justice.’ Actors dressed as historic figures describe their character’s contribution to the pursuit of justice: Frederick Douglass at 7 pm tonight, Eleanor Roosevelt at 7 pm tomorrow and Thurgood Marshall at 7 pm Sunday -- all at the Center for the Arts Theatre, 800 S. Rolling Road.

In the first half of the 19th century, wealthy Baltimore was in love with art, especially art from Europe. Art historian Stanley Mazaroff tells of George A. Lucas, the son of one upscale family who was so enamored that just before the Civil War he moved to Paris and built a new kind of career -- as a transatlantic agent advising prosperous American collectors.

Mazaroff's account of George Lucas' life as an art agent and collector is "A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure". He’s speaking about it next Thursday evening, July 19 at 7 pm at the Ivy Bookstore on Falls road.

Larry Canner/JHU

About two million people in the U.S. have lost an arm, a hand, a leg or other limb. Many opt to use a prosthesis -- a fabricated upper or lower limb. Luke Osborn, a graduate student in biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University, tells us about an electronic skin that can create the sensation of touch for the user of an upper-limb prosthesis. And George Levay, a research participant who lost his arms to meningitis, describes what it was like using the electronic skin on his prosthetic hand.

Amy Webb / Future Today Institute

Summer means a bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables. But when you choose those juicy plums or ripe tomatoes from your favorite grocery produce section … do you stop to question where and how they were grown? Amy Webb, founder of the ‘Future Today Institute’, has some answers. She talks about the future of farming, from genetic editing to collaborative robots to urban indoor warehouse farms. She also offers some perspective about the sci-fi feel of agricultural technology developments.

Webb suggests the online magazine, Modern Farmer, as a good, accessible source to stay informed on future farming developments.

Brenda Sanders / Thrive Baltimore

After a holiday week when grills have been ablaze for hot dogs, burgers and ribs, we’re going to shift focus -- and diet -- to learn about some delicious vegan options for summer meals. We talk with Brenda Sanders, co-founder and CEO of Thrive Baltimore. Thrive Baltimore provides education and resources to those seeking to adopt a vegan diet and lifestyle. Tomorrow, July 7, from noon to 6pm they’re hosting the second annual Vegan Marketplace, at 6 E. Lafayette Ave. Free Admission!

Here's a Stoop Story from 'Cafeteria Man' Tony Geraci about how working in school kitchens steered him to his passion. Geraci led efforts in Baltimore and in Memphis to make public school lunches more nutritious. Now, he works as a consultant to create healthier meals for children across the U.S. You can hear his story and others at stoopstorytelling dot com.

(AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Thousands of children and adults have crossed the southern U.S. border. For some, violence in their home countries pushed them to this risky journey. While the practice of separating families at the border has ended. About two thousand children have yet to be reunited with their parents. Emily Kephart from the legal advocacy group Kids in Need of Defense, tells us about the case of a six-year-old girl who for weeks has been held far from her father.

Then UMBC political science professor Jeffrey Davis describes treaties and international laws that govern how refugees are treated, and promise them due process. You can read his piece on the US' 'zero tolerance' immigration policies at The Conversation.

Melissa Gerr

Sunscreen, bug spray, shampoo, deodorant. When we wash personal care products like these off of our bodies, they go down the drain, pass through wastewater treatment plants, and end up in our rivers and oceans. Scientists have found numerous ill effects from these chemicals, including the feminization of fish. Environmental engineer Lee Blaney, associate professor at UMBC, joins us to talk about his research in local waterways.

Read about Blaney's research here.

Historic London Town and Gardens

In 1683 London Town was established on the South River, in Anne Arundel County. It was a vibrant trade point, but faded away by the 1800s. Kyle Dalton, Public Programs Administrator of Historic London Town and Gardens, says the town’s residents were commoners--tailors, indentured servants, slaves.

How might London Town’s residents have reacted to news of the Declaration of Independence? Check out information about the living history events this Saturday and Sunday here.

We learn how the historic site is working with the U.S. Marine Corps Historical Company, to bring the past to life. Sgt. Thomas Williams, director of the USMCHC, and Beth Hall, deputy director of the Material Division, give us an inside look.

Maureen Harvie / WYPR

What does it take to become a citizen? An interview, a civics exam, and a lot of paperwork.

But these challenges are worth it to those seeking a permanent home in the United States. Yana Cascioffe is the Citizenship Program Coordinator at Baltimore City Community College, which runs classes across the state to prepare people for the naturalization process.

We hear from current students, as well as a Russian immigrant who became a citizen in May.

That was a Stoop Story from Catharine Deitch about serving overseas during World War II in the Women’s Army Corps. You can hear more Stoop stories and the Stoop podcast here.

Fort George G. Meade Museum website

Soon after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941, a presidential order permitted wide-scale imprisonment of people of Japanese ancestry. Not as well known: This order also allowed Germans and Italians to be held, and several hundred were, at Fort Meade Army Base. Kevin Leonard, who writes The Laurel Leader’s “History Matters” column, describes his research into this internment camp.

Melissa Gerr

We’re about a decade in to single-stream recycling in Maryland --how is the system working? And how are we doing? Is the process cost effective? Is recycling worthwhile? We ask Robert Murrow, recycling coordinator at Baltimore City Department of Public Works, about the business of recycling. Plus, DPW recycling collection employee Roland Weeks Jr. describes realities of the work and his colleague Welford Lee Johnson Jr. offers advice to aspirational recyclers.

WYPR

Insurgents are triumphant in many Democratic primary races. Progressive Ben Jealous, former head of the NAACP, decisively defeated moderate Rushern Baker of Prince George’s County for the Democratic nomination to face off against incumbent GOP Governor Larry Hogan in the fall. Jealous promised his supporters victory.

The drubbing of the Democratic establishment was not only at the top of the ticket: In the legislature, powerful committee chairmen were ousted, and at least one more seems headed to defeat. Republican voters seemed to send a more moderate message, We’ll analyze what the voters are saying with political commentator Barry Rascovar and WYPR Baltimore County reporter John Lee.

Ivy Bookshop

We think of ice cream as a summertime indulgence ... but year round, Americans average about a pint per person each week! To get the scoop on our love affair with the frozen treat, we talk with Amy Ettinger, author of the book, Sweet Spot: An Ice Cream Binge Across America. Plus, Tim Andon of T-I-C Gums tells us about the Ice Cream University and graduate Whitney LaRoche describes what it was like to create a winning ice cream flavor.

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