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Creating jobs, cutting red-tape, managing the budget---the nine Democrats running for governor told us their economic priorities. Political columnist Barry Rascovar of Political Maryland analyzes their answers.

Best Meals-Live!

Jun 10, 2018
@chefwolf/Instagram

Foreman and Wolf goes live to take your calls and emails. This week, listeners tell about the best meal they ever had. From dumplings in Hong Kong to chile rellenos in New Mexico, your stories remind us that the experience we have and who we share it with is often as important as the food we eat.

Copyright Andrew Duncan

Tom’s guest today is Jennifer Palmieri. She was the Communications Director for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign and the White House Communications Director for President Barack Obama. She is also a former national press secretary for the Democratic Party, the press secretary during John Edwards’ 2004 presidential campaign, and she served in the Clinton White House, as well.  Jennifer Palmieri is now the president of the Center for American Progress Action Fund.

Her new book is a reflection on Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, and a shout-out to the women who will do what Secretary Clinton was unable to do: break the glass ceiling at the White House. It’s called "Dear Madam President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World." 

Photo by Mary Gardella

Norma Pera is a dancer and dance teacher who has trained generations of young dancers in Baltimore at the Baltimore School for the Arts, where she has led the dance department since 1992.

She joined BSA’s dance faculty in 1979, 39 years ago, when the innovative pre-professional public school for the arts first opened. Many of her students have gone on to illustrious careers in dance or the arts, and many other fields. She joins Tom in Studio A.

Ms. Pera is retiring this week from the School for the Arts. The school will celebrate her career and her legacy tomorrow afternoon, June 9, at 4 pm. For more information and to reserve tickets for that event, click here.

Here’s a Stoop Story told by Lauren Francis Sharma at the Baltimore Book Festival in 2016. She was unhappily working as a corporate lawyer in 1998 when she decided to take a chance on becoming an author. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Stefan Malmesjö / Flickr via Creative Commons

The Maryland State Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped offers books for readers of all ages in a variety of forms - from large print to Braille and audio materials. We hear from Robyn Hughes, a patron of the library for four decades. And from library director Leslie Bowman, who says new technology has vastly expanded access for readers with limited sight.

Mt. Royal Station

Jun 8, 2018

Gil remembers the end of the line at Mt. Royal Station.  

disney.com

On this edition of Midday at the Movies -- our monthly look at new flicks and new trends in the film industry --movie mavens Ann Hornaday, film critic for the Washington Post, and Jed Dietz, founding director of the Maryland Film Festival,  join Tom to consider the surprisingly weak box office performance of the latest iteration of the Star Wars franchise,  director Ron Howard's Solo: A Star Wars Story, and the equally surprising popularity of RBG, the new documentary about the life and career of 84 year-old Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, co-directed by Betsy West and Julie Cohen.

Plus, Ann and Jed list their picks for new summer films you'll want to check out at local theaters.

photo by Matthew Murphy

Each Thursday, Midday's peripatetic theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, joins us with a review of one of the region's many theatrical offerings.  This week, she's spotlighting On Your Feet!, the new touring musical production based on the life and career of Cuban pop sensations (and husband-and-wife team) Gloria and Emilio Estefan, that's now on stage at Baltimore's Hippodrome Theatre.

MD Dept Public Safety and Correctional Services

Maryland’s prisons have clamped how on where inmates can acquire books--they can now can order from just two limited vendors. The department of corrections says books from other sources can be used to smuggle drugs, and that can fuel violence behind bars. We ask Sonia Kumar, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, why ACLU-MD contends the new restrictions violate the First Amendment.

Then we talk to Glennor Shirley about her two decades running libraries in Maryland’s prisons and how she viewed her responsibility to her patrons.

Here is the letter sent by ACLU-MD to DPSCS

Check out the Ear Hustle podcast here

Photo Courtesy Flickr

 

Today, on Midday, a conversation about the Foster Care System.  Nearly 430,000 children and young people are currently in the care of foster families.  About 112,000 of them are hoping to be adopted permanently.  And for the young people who “age out” of the system on their 18th or 21st birthdays, the challenges are daunting, and the statistics are devastating.

Only three to four percent of young people who are foster care alumni earn a college degree by the age of 26.  One in five will experience homelessness.  Only half will be employed.  7 of 10 female foster youth will become pregnant by the time they are 21, and one in four foster youth will experience PTSD.

Tom’s guests include Shalita O’Neale, Founder and Executive Director of the Fostering Change Network.  Fostering Change is producing a conference this weekend at Johns Hopkins Medicine to connect people in the system with resources and networking opportunities.

And joining us on the line from the studios of NPR in Washington is Jelani Freeman.  Like Shalita O’Neale, he is a product of the foster care system.  He is an attorney who serves as a court appointed special advocate for foster children in Washington, and he sits on the board of the Center for Adoption Support and Education.

We will also hear testimony from Luigi Kramer, a 22 year old college student and foster care alum who has recently transitioned out of the system; and Lisa Phillips an entrepreneur and alum who was  taken into care in the 1980’s. 

Rachel Baye / WYPR

Democrats running for governor agree Maryland public schools are slipping, and most argue the state should spend more. Baltimore Sun opinion editor Andy Green helps us decipher the field on education.

Photo Courtesy Flickr

 

On today’s, edition of Midday Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parkswe examine some of the stories making headlines across the country.

We begin to with a look at the cognitive effects of violent video games and the Military’s stake in the multi-billion dollar industry of gaming.  Following the deadly May 18th shooting at Santa Fe High School, Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick cited violent video games as a contributing factor to the national epidemic of deadly violence and apathy in our culture, reigniting the debate on the psychological effects of violent video games on our children, specifically young boys. 

Serena Williams returned to the French Open last week after 14 months of maternity leave. In keeping with WTA policy, the former world number one entered into the grand slam tournament unseeded.  Serena’s experience has many questioning not only the WTA’s policies towards new mothers; but also, the broader politics of women and pregnancy in the workplace.

Finally, the Trumpian era has been marked by political tension, social tumult and temerarious tweets.   It is an era of fraught with class and racial division, violent identity politics and targeted attacks on the media.  These deep societal fissures came to a head this week, as comediennes Samantha Bee and Roseanne Barr became the mascots for America’s new ‘culture wars’ . 

Dr. Sheri Parks is the Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and a regular contributor to our show on Midday Culture Connections.  She’s the author of Fierce Angels: Living with a Legacy from the Sacred Dark Feminine to the Strong Black Woman.

Hedwig Storch/Wikimedia Commons

It’s estimated that more than fifty million voice-assisted devices -- like smartphones and smartspeakers -- are currently in use in the U.S.

From a usability perspective, voice-assisted technology, or artificial intelligence, has made it easier for millions of people to perform daily activities and access information. But are there dangers that lie in that scenario? We ask that question to Amy Webb, founder of the the ‘Future Today Institute,’ which researches emerging technologies as they move from the fringe to the mainstream.

all photos by Wendel Patrick

On the east side of Detroit, the streets of MorningSide are lined with stately, brick Tudor-style houses.  But today, one in four of those houses is abandoned, boarded up, gutted, or burned out.  The foreclosure crisis of 2008 hit MorningSide like a tidal wave, and the neighborhood is struggling to sprout again from the rubble. There’s a lot of buzz about a new Renaissance in downtown Detroit, but the locals in this corner of town are wondering when – and if – the revival is going to make its way to them.  In the meantime, they’re holding their own and looking out for each other.  In this special episode, Out of the Blocks teams up with Michigan Radio’s MorningSide 48224 podcast to share voices from MorningSide.

photo by Earl Wilson, New York Times

Many have suggested that this election year is, once again, the year of the woman.  As primaries continue in this mid-term cycle, there are nearly 80 women who have already secured a spot on November 2018 ballots for U.S. congressional seats and governorships across the country.

Today, Tom's guest is Amy Chozick, a reporter for the New York Times who covered Hillary Clinton, the most famous woman in American politics, in her two attempts to win the White House.  Chozick's new book is called Chasing Hillary: Ten Years, Two Presidential Campaigns and One Intact Glass Ceiling

There is no shortage of theories to explain why Secretary Clinton was not able to break the glass ceiling of the Presidency, even when pitted against a candidate who was as divisive and abhorrent to as many people as Donald Trump was, and continues to be.  But how does Clinton's loss in 2016 -- and her loss to her Democratic rival, Barack Obama, in 2012 -- inform the current crop of women who are storming the barricades in this cycle?  Given Clinton’s unique place in American politics, in what ways might she present a model for that woman who eventually does break the proverbial glass ceiling of the Oval Office?

Amy Chozick joins Tom for the hour.

Maryland Big Tree Program

From tree pollen to soaring saplings, we’re wild for the woods. Matthew Fitzpatrick of UMCES explains the connection between ancient pollen and climate change. Read more about pollen DNA and tree migration here.

And Joli McCathran of the Maryland Big Tree Program describes measuring trees of record size. To find a champion tree or to nominate one, check out the Maryland Big Tree website.

Summer Foods

Jun 3, 2018
Godfrey's Farm/Facebook

As summer approaches, we take a look at some of our favorite goodies that come along with the season through interviews with three summer sustenance experts. Erik Oosterwijk of Fells Point Wholesale Meats shares his favorite cuts for the grill, David Alima from The Charmery takes us on a deep dive into his wild world of ice cream and Lisa Godfrey of Godfrey’s Farm tells us about the delicious peaches and corn to come down on the eastern shore.

photo courtesy Thiru for Baltimore.

Continuing our series of Conversations with the Candidates, our focus today is on the Democratic primary election later this month for Baltimore City State’s Attorney Three candidates, including the incumbent, Marilyn Mosby, are competing in that race to be the city’s top prosecutor.

It’s a big job, overseeing more than 200 lawyers and tens of thousands of prosecutions every year, and it's a job our guest today would very much like to have. 

Thiru Vignarajah is a former prosecutor who’s spent most of his legal career in public service.  He was born in Baltimore to Sri Lankan immigrant parents, both of them Baltimore City public school teachers. Vignarajah himself is a product of the public school system, having gone from Edmondson Heights and Woodlawn High to Yale University and Harvard Law School, where he served as president of the Harvard Law Review . He went on to clerk for Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer, and he served as a federal prosecutor at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Baltimore, working under then-U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein. Vignarajah subsequently moved to the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office, where he headed the Major Investigations Unit.

Joseph Trucano

What makes some music hot--or not--and how does business enable the artistry? That’s the topic of the next Great Talk” discussion, a series that describes itself as ‘Conversations with a Purpose.’ It’s also our cue to question one of the next Great Talk presenters, classical pianist Susan Zhang. She’s co-owner of The Concert Truck, a mobile recital hall that delivers free classical music concerts to audiences in unexpected locations--from parks, to public squares to community center parking lots.

Here's improv performer Will Hines, telling his Stoop Story about the time he and his co-host Connor recorded their podcast from Abbey Road studios in London. You can hear his story and many others at Stoopstorytelling dot com.

WKC Signoff

Jun 1, 2018

The story of the very first radio station to broadcast in Baltimore is lost in the dustbin of Baltimore history - never to realize the full recognition it deserved.  That's because the father of the young builder of the station threw the station out - his son's most promising and historic creation!  

Today on Midday, a conversation about race, and corporate culture. 

Last Wednesday, the NFL announced that they would ban players from kneeling on the field during the national anthem, and that they teams would face fines if any players chose to do so. 

On Tuesday, ABC cancelled the reboot of the popular 90’s sitcom “Roseanne” following racist tweets by the program’s star Roseanne Barr. 

While Barr was getting boot, 175,000 Starbucks employees were engaged in racial bias training, as the company closed 8,000 locations following an incident in Philadelphia in which two African American men were arrested for...well, being in Starbucks.   How is institutional racism and racial bias confronted in the corporate world?

Tom is joined by Dr. Kimberly Moffitt is an associate professor of American Studies and affiliate assistant professor of Africana Studies and Language, Literacy and Culture at the University of MD Baltimore County.  

Michael Fletcher is a senior writer at the Undefeated, ESPN’s online platform that explores the intersection of race, culture and sports.  He is a former national economics reporter for the Washington Post..  

And on the phone, Milton Kent, the host of Sports at Large here on WYPR, and a lecturer in the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University. 

photo courtesy Annapolis Shakespeare Co.

It's Thursday, and time again for a visit with Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck, who joins us in the studio each week with her reviews of the region's theatrical endeavors.  This week, she spotlights the new production of Kiss Me, Kate, the Bard-inspired musical now on stage at Annapolis Shakespeare Company

Kiss Me, Kate is the "backstage" story of the production of a fictional musical version of William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, fueled by the conflicts, on-stage and off, between the show's director, producer and star, and his temperamental leading lady (and ex-wife).

Written by Samuel and Bella Spewack, with music and lyrics by the inimitable Cole PorterKiss Me, Kate opened on Broadway in 1948 and enjoyed a long and successful initial run. In 1949, it won five Tony Awards, including the first Tony ever presented for Best Musical.  Ever since, it has been a frequent and internationally popular choice for revivals.

Directed and choreographed for Annapolis Shakespeare Company by Sally Boyett, with musical direction by Marc IrwinKiss Me Kate features a 17-member cast led by Benjamin Russell as producer Fred Graham and Robin Weiner as his ex-wife and star, Lilli Vanessi.

Kiss Me Kate continues at Annapolis Shakespeare Company through Sunday June 3.

Creative Commons photo

Early on Saturday morning, June 2, several thousand runners are expected to turn out for the 10th annual Baltimore Ten-Miler.   It starts and finishes in Druid Hill Park, and includes scenic strolls across 33rd Street and around Lake Montebello.  When that many runners lace-up and hit the pavement, there are bound to be a few twisted ankles, sore knees and strained backs.  

Dr. Miho Tanaka joins Tom in the studio to talk about how you can avoid serious injuries on race day and how you can minimize some of the inevitable aches and pains that follow a long run.  Dr. Tanaka also discusses the importance of an active lifestyle, and different kinds of exercise that help us stay healthy.  

Dr. Tanaka is an orthopedic surgeon and the Director of the Women’s Sports Medicine Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Before moving to Baltimore, she was the team physician for the St. Louis Cardinals and the St Louis Surge in the WNBA.  She’s also served as assistant team physician for the Baltimore Orioles and another professional women’s basketball team, the NY Liberty.   

Dr. Tanaka also answers listeners' questions about fitness and training routines, and possible treatments for the aches and pains of their active lives.

AP Images

On the Record has spoken with all nine Democratic gubernatiorial candidates about why they’re running, what issues they think are most important and how they would address them and what they think sets each of them apart--why voters should pick them to be the Democrats’ standard bearer against incumbent Republican Gov. Larry Hogan. Today our expert analyst and commentator is Mileah Kromer, associate professor of political science at Goucher College. She directors the Sarah T. Hughes Field politics center  and is the force behind the respected Goucher Poll.

Johns Hopkins University

Before we begin today’s show, here’s a link that lists organizations that are helping people in Ellicott City with shelter, food and other humanitarian relief, following the severe flooding in that city’s historic downtown on Sunday – the second deadly flood in two years.

Today, it’s another edition of Midday on Ethics. We’re exploring some ethical questions pulled straight from the headlines. We begin with the ethics of organ transplantation, amid news of a medical breakthrough -- a transplant performed just weeks ago at Johns Hopkins Hospital here in Baltimore. For the first time, anywhere, doctors successfully performed a total penis and scrotum transplant on a service member who was injured in Afghanistan. Now that it’s possible to transplant a penis, or a uterus, what are the ethical issues that donors, recipients and transplant surgeons need to consider? Should we think about life-saving transplants like hearts and kidneys in the same way as non-lifesaving surgeries, the so-called quality-of-life transplants?

Plus, another news story caught our eye: California investigators used publicly available genetic information that was posted on an ancestry website to identify someone that they say is the Golden State Killer. He has been charged with murders police say he committed more than 30 years ago. Is your genetic information publicly available? Should it be, and if so, should it be more private than it is?

Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, the director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, is Tom’s guest today in Studio A.  Dr. Kahn stops by from time to time to help us explore how ethicists frame these kinds of very complex questions.

Creative Commons photo

It's Midday: The Afro-Check In, a regular feature where we sit down with our colleagues at the Baltimore-Afro American Newspapers to talk about some important local news developments.  

This week: grief and racial tension on both sides of the City/County line as the death of Baltimore County Police Officer Amy Caprio, and the subsequent charges handed down to four Baltimore City teens, have unleashed a torrent of political mudslinging and racially charged bitterness. 

Also, with early voting in the Maryland primaries a little more than two weeks away, tensions continue to simmer between the campaign of gubernatorial candidate Valerie Ervin and the Maryland State Board of Elections, over the Board's decision not to provide updated ballots printed with the names and new candidacies of Ms. Ervin and her running mate, Marisol Johnson. 

Joining Tom here in Studio A:  Sean Yoes, the Baltimore Editor of The Afro-American Newspapers, and host of the podcast, Afro First Edition.  Sean is also the co-host of a new podcast that has its home here at WYPR:  Truth and Reconciliation.

Hamza Butt / Flickr via Creative Commons

Starbucks cafes across the country will be closed this afternoon for racial bias training, in the wake of an incident in a Philadelphia Starbucks last month. Two black men were arrested, seemingly for the crime of not buying anything. Millions have watched a video of the event.

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