On the Record | WYPR

On the Record

The Baltimore Museum of Industry

Paid or unpaid, a new career or the family profession--Americans spend most of their days working. A new exhibit at the Baltimore Museum of Industry asks visitors to share thoughts and feelings about what work means in their lives.

We hear from Gillian Waldo, a graduating senior from Hopkins, who helped curate the exhibit. And from Beth Maloney, director of interpretation at the museum, who led students through this process.

The Baltimore Museum on Industry will be celebrating the 10th year of its farmers' market on Saturday with live music, kids activities, and free admission to the museum. More information here.

Maryland Business Roundtable for Education

Youngsters from families where money is tight and education and job opportunities may have been limited often don’t see themselves as headed for college or a career. Enter: Next Generation Scholars, a state effort to tell pupils about college and get them on track.

We meet Nona Carroll, chief strategist for the nonprofit Maryland Business Roundtable for Education, which is working in five counties, and Aundra Anderson, coordinating Next Generation Scholars in Kent County.

Mayor's Office of Neighborhoods

Baltimore City has lost 10,000 people or more since 2015. Meanwhile, the state’s population is growing. Why are people leaving the city, and what can be done to stop the drain? We talk to sociologist Karl Alexander about how adapting schools to parents’ goals might keep middle-class families in the city. And University of Baltimore professor Seema Iyer, head of the Baltimore Neighborhood Indicators Alliance, talks about what neighbors can do to hold on to their communities.

Goodreads

Laura Lippman’s latest mystery is called Sunburn -- but it’s not sunny; it’s noir. In the tradition of James M. Cain --The Postman Always Rings Twice -- Lippman brings us lovers who don’t trust each other, each hiding secrets that spin into more violent mystery. Original airdate 2/20/18

Melissa Gerr

Warming weather is a great excuse to get outside. The Natural History Society of Maryland offers hands-on opportunities for lay people and experts to observe nature’s wonders --shoulder-to-shoulder -- out in the field. We meet educator and master gardener Judy Fulton, who hosts bi-monthly workshops that focus on identification of native and non-native plants and invasives. And naturalist and entomologist Nick Spero tells us about ‘fossil-hunting meet ups,’ opportunities to raise moths and butterflies at home and the many resources available to the public. NHSM is hosting their fundraising gala Cabinet of Curiosities on May 19. For information about all of the programs, visit the NHSM site here.

Baltimore Rock Opera Society

The Baltimore Rock Opera Society, or BROS, is fueled by the passion and dedication of a small army of volunteers who swear by ‘big and loud’ when it comes to theater. The newest show, ‘Incredibly Dead,’ is a gore-infused B-horror romp filled with surprising twists and turns. We get a preview from co-director Sarah Doccolo and executive director Aran Keating. More info at the BROS site.

John Marra, a member of the Baltimore Rock Opera Society artistic council, tells a Stoop Story about the magic of community theater and the importance of believing in yourself, always. You can hear his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Melissa Gerr

Women are the fastest-growing group of veterans, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. And about half the country’s two million female veterans are of childbearing age. We meet Dr. Catherine Staropoli, medical director of women’s health at the VA and Zelda McCormick, a nurse and the program manager for the Women’s Clinic. They tailor the care veterans receive at the women’s clinic inside the Baltimore VA medical center.

We also visit a baby shower honoring new and expecting veteran moms.

The White House Youtube Channel

What’s next, now that President Trump has pulled the U.S. out of the nuclear deal his predecessor negotiated with Iran? Maryland’s U.S. Senator Ben Cardin says Iran has complied with the deal, and quitting it does not make the world safer. He says Congress must ready to act if Iran supports terrorists or gets close to nuclear weapons. And Skip Auld, who served in the Peace Corps in Iran 45 years ago, worries it could be a step toward war. 

One of out four Baltimore residents lives in a neighborhood without a grocery store. Why is it so hard hard for some city residents to access to affordable and nutritious food?

Eric Jackson, of the Black Yield Institute, and Madeline Hardy, a senior at Goucher College, explore the issues of food justice in their documentary “Baltimore’s Strange Fruit”. Jackson points to the generational disenfranchisement of African Americans, who were shut out of benefiting from the agricultural economy. 

On Thursday there’s screening of “Baltimore’s Strange Fruit” at the Baltimore Free Farm. Next week, there is a screening on Wednesday at Charm City Farms in Greenmount East and on Thursday, at Cherry Hill Urban Garden.

Augustine Herrman / Library of Congress Geography and Map Division

A show today about the Chesapeake. First, a book, called--“A Biography of a Map in Motion.” It’s the backstory of a map by 17th-century trader, diplomat, and immigrant Augustine Herrman. Towson history professor Christian Koot says Herrman’s map was a godsend for merchants who traveled from Delaware to Virginia, and for Lord Baltimore, who wanted to show off the growth of his colony.

Then, fast-forward four centuries: Karl Blankenship, editor of the Bay Journal, on why the record growth of underwater grasses is a good sign for the Bay’s health. Read more from Karl here.

Here is a Stoop story from Mary Beth Lennon, describing what it means to be the child of an Irish immigrant mother. Her story has been edited for length. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com.

Laura Elizabeth Pohl

There’s new hope, since the heads of North and South Korea met a week ago. But for thousands of Koreans, reuniting and even communicating with family has been complicated--most often, impossible--since Korean War hostilities stopped in 1953.

Photographer and filmmaker Laura Elizabeth Pohl tells us about her traveling photo exhibit ‘A Long Separation,’ which delves, from a very personal perspective, into how that war not only divided a nation, it divided families. 

Joe Tropea/Hit and Stay

Fifty years ago nine Catholic activists catapulted the small suburb of Catonsville, Maryland into the national spotlight. They burst into a Selective Service office, seized draft records and torched them with napalm, to protest the U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. We meet Willa Bickham and Brendan Walsh, founders of Viva House and also were ‘support activists’ who assisted the Nine to discuss the tie between their faith and their activism. Then curator and filmmaker Joe Tropea tells us about the Maryland Historical Society’s exhibit ‘Activism and Art: The Catonsville Nine, Fifty Years Later.'

For more Catonsville Nine 50th anniversary events, visit this link.

A spunky African-American teenager adopted into a Jewish family in Baltimore trying to sort out her identify. That’s the nub of the new young-adult novel "The Length of a String". We ask author Elissa Brent Weissman what inspired the story … and whether she’s the right person to tell it. She’ll be speaking and signing books Sunday at 2 pm at Afters Cafe, 1001 South Charles Street in Baltimore.  

Then, a very different novel by a local author: Michael Downs’ "The Strange and True Tale of Horace Wells" -- fiction filling in the story of the 19th-century dentist who first used laughing gas to numb the pain of surgery. He’ll be speaking about it next Thursday, May 10, at the Ivy Bookstore on Falls Road.

What does it take to start over in a new country? Filmmaker Alexandra Shiva explores the obstacles and triumphs of four Syrian families as they rebuild their lives in Baltimore. Her new documentary is titled, ‘This is Home’. You can see the film at the Maryland Film Festival on Saturday and Sunday at the MICA Brown Center. More info here.

And Ruben Chandrasekar, head of the local offices of the International Rescue Committee, describes how the IRC supports refugees during this transition.

Yes, we know it’s Monday. Not our regular day for Stoop. But here’s a Stoop Story about family -- from Martha Weiman about how her family escaped the Holocaust and reunited with her aunt and uncle. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Mural by Joel Bergner. Photo taken by Chuck Patch / Flickr via Creative Commons

The nonprofit Comité Latino connects people in the Hispanic community to resources they can use regardless of their immigration status or their ability to speak English. We hear from three members who came to the United States to work and raise families here.

That was Stoop Story from Josh Fruhlinger, about the highs and lows of competing on Jeopardy. You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Wikimedia Commons

The 100th anniversary of composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein’s birth, coming up this summer, has sparked a global celebration of the revolutionary maestro’s life and career----thousands of performances, symposia and events extolling his contributions to opera, theater, dance, film, and orchestra.

NPR’s Scott Simon will be part of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra’s special “Salute to Bernstein” a week from tomorrow, led by Marin Alsop. She was a student of Bernstein’s, and reflects on what she learned from him.

More information about the May 5th concert at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra here. WYPR is a media partner for this event. 

Ivy Bookshop

We think of species taking a long time to adapt to changes in their surroundings. Not necessarily, says evolutionary biologist and ecologist Menno Schilthuizen. In his new book, "Darwin Comes to Town: How the Urban Jungle Drives Evolution" he asserts we can find evidence right in our own back yard. Schilthuizen says plants and animals can adapt quickly to survive. Things like mating preferences and diet are in flux when it comes to city living.

Don LaVange

Where can pregnant women struggling with addiction to opioids turn for help? How are infants affected by exposure to opioids?

Julia Lurie, a reporter for Mother Jones, set out answer these questions. She tells us about two women in Baltimore who sought treatment at the Johns Hopkins ‘Center for Addiction and Pregnancy’ - known as CAP. Check out her reporting, "Homeless. Addicted to Heroin. About to Give Birth." Julia Lurie has also written about how the opioid epidemic is impacting the foster care system

CAP brings together medical providers of several specialties to care for mothers and infants together. It’s a unique model that Dr. Lauren Jansson, director of pediatrics at CAP, says makes a big difference.

Maryland Legal Aid

Lawyer in the Library, a partnership between Maryland Legal Aid and the Enoch Pratt Free Library, grew out of the civil unrest in Baltimore City after Freddie Gray died from injuries received in police custody. Lawyer in the Library gives convenient access to free legal advice right in the neighborhood. Amy Petkovsek from Maryland Legal Aid and her client Shannon Powell, along with Melanie Townsend Diggs, former manager of the Pennsylvania Avenue Branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, talk about the genesis of the free legal assistance program and the difference its made in thousands of people's lives. 

Derek Bruff / Flickr via Creative Commons

The debts attached to nearly five thousand homes in Baltimore are up for tax sale next month as the city moves to recoup unpaid fees, taxes and water charges. While overdue water bills can no longer be only item that sets a property up for a tax sale, they do count toward the overall debt.

Margaret Henn of the Pro Bono Resource Center of Maryland says that’s a problem because of leaks and billing disputes with the Department of Public Works.

The Pro Bono Resource Center's last free legal clinic runs from 2 to 6 pm tomorrow, at the Zeta Center for Healthy and Active Aging on Reisterstown Road. You can register by phone at 443-703-3052. More info here.

Take a listen to this Stoop story from teacher and poet Azya Maxton about the power of poetry. You can hear her story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

How can writing and reading poetry be a lifeline in times of trouble?

Ahead of a visit this weekend to Baltimore, poet and professor Gregory Orr tells us how he came to poetry after the tragic death of his younger brother in a hunting accident. He shares how poetry rescued him from overwhelming guilt and grief, and helped him regain an awareness of life’s beauty.

Gregory Orr will be at the Joshua Ringel Memorial Reading on Sunday, April 22 at Hodson Hall on the Johns Hopkins University Homewood Campus. The event is starts at 5 pm. More information here.

Amazon

She’s known as the ‘First Lady of Song’ and the ‘Queen of Jazz.’ Ella Jane Fitzgerald overcame poverty, abuse and racism to build an international career that spanned seven decades and a charitable foundation in her name. We talk with Geoffrey Mark, performer and author of ‘Ella: A Biography of the Legendary Ella Fitzgerald,’ who walks us through the story behind the music. To purchase tickets for Mr. Mark's performance at Germano's Piattini Cabaret at 6pm on April 25, Ella's 101st birthday, visit this link.

Flyer for the Course/Jessica Marie Johnson

‘Knowledge is Power’ is a familiar adage. In our digital age, perhaps a more relevant aphorism and one exemplified by our guests today is ‘Knowledge is Access.’ Case in point: access to the syllabus for ‘Black Womanhood,’ a graduate course at Johns Hopkins University, has been made available online ... and has spread like wildfire. The course is co-taught by Professor Martha S. Jones, the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor, and Professor of History, at Johns Hopkins University Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Professor Jessica Marie Johnson, Assistant Professor in the Center for Africana Studies and Department of History at Hopkins. They discuss why access to knowledge can be so powerful and how online engagement affects curriculum.

You can access the Black Womanhood course syllabus here.

At the Strong City Baltimore Stoop Storytelling show two months ago, Sophia Garber shared her experience about coming to Baltimore, making friends, and sticking with it against all odds.

Check out the Stoop podcast and info about Stoop events here.

Pages