© 2021 WYPR
50yrsHeader.png
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

coronavirus

  • We’ve all felt the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic these last 15 or so months. A new survey quantifies those impacts, especially for people who were struggling financially before the pandemic began. And NAACP leaders call for suspending the police officers involved in recent violent arrests of Black teens in Ocean City — and maybe a boycott of Ocean City businesses.
  • Just over a year ago, the need to ‘disinfect’ and ‘sanitize’ became a priority for every American. Mountains of Clorox wipes and gallons of hand sanitizer later, what long-term effects could increased use of antibacterials have on our health? Or for our water?Amy Sapkota, professor of Applied Environmental Health at the University of Maryland, studies links between real-world microbial exposures and infectious disease in humans. Antibacterial agents are necessary, she says, but some are better and safer than others. Original air date: March 31, 2021.
  • More than five million Marylanders have received a Covid vaccine dose. Now the state is moving its focus from mass vaccination sites to mobile outreach.Health Secretary Dennis Schrader describes the efforts. And as younger teens become eligible for the Pfizer vaccine, we ask how the state will expand access.Then, Amy Liebman of the Migrant Clinicians Network talks about the increased Covid risks facing immigrant workers in poultry and crab processing.
  • The pandemic is distributing financial and other stresses, like its health damages--chaotically. They’re colliding on people who never before reached out for mental-health support but are now seeking help.
  • Child care is an essential service, but the pandemic rocked the industry: capacity was restricted and cleaning costs soared.We speak with Laura Weeldreyer of the nonprofit Maryland Family Network, and ask what President Biden’s "American Families Plan" would mean for the industry. Then, Christina Peusch, who leads the Maryland State Child Care Association, and Imani-Angela Rose, co-owner of a center in Northwest Baltimore, detail hurdles facing providers.
  • Only a small number of Marylanders who have received their first COVID-19 vaccine shot have skipped their second dose, less than 4 percent.But Dr. William Moss, who leads the International Vaccine Access Center at the Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, says it’s a risky move. He talks about the factors behind vaccine drop-off.Then, the math that signals the end of the pandemic. UMBC health economist Zoë McLaren gives us a lesson in exponential decay. Read her New York Times piece, "The Math That Explains the End of the Pandemic."
  • March is Women’s History Month, which offers an opportunity to reflect on the headwinds and structural inequalities that limit women’s ability to prepare, save, and reach long-term financial goals.
  • Serving Homeless Individuals During The Pandemic
  • Nearly two-thirds of Maryland residents say they plan to get the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible, according to the latest Goucher College Poll…