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Tuggle Withdraws Application for Top Police Job

He says change will take five to seven years "and I don't have five to seven years to give."

WYPR News

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

The federal judge overseeing major reforms of the Baltimore Police Department told officials Tuesday that changes in discipline policies, training and emergency responses are “only half” the issue. The other half is the police department’s culture, he said.

U.S. District Judge James Bredar called attention to Harlem Park, as he did in an earlier hearing. Harlem Park is the neighborhood where Detective Sean Suiter was shot dead almost a year ago.

Rachel Baye

Democratic candidate for governor Ben Jealous is accusing Gov. Larry Hogan of mocking his speech impairment.

The dispute stems from a video Hogan’s campaign posted online on Monday. The roughly 30-second video shows Jealous mixing up his words — saying “Virginia” when he means Maryland and “president” when he means governor.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

In February, Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh said she would not release an audit of the police department’s overtime claims because it was part of the evidence in a police union suit against the city. But now, the mayor has changed her mind.

Mayor Catherine Pugh announced Wednesday that she will name a new Baltimore Police Commissioner by the end of the month. The announcement comes among talk of new changes to the department and training efforts.

BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport

Contract employees at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, along with the nation’s largest service workers’ union, called Tuesday afternoon for higher wages and improved health insurance benefits for those workers. This was all part of demonstrations at 11 airports around the country.

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Out of the Blocks

This Isn't What I Used to Do

Stories about surprising second acts, from the owner of a pinball museum, a Kashmiri journalist exiled to a snack counter, a washer repairman with a checkered past, a funeral director who stumbled into the job after he married into the business, a former gang member who now runs a religious radio station, a guy who turned his rock n roll music studio into a corporate voiceover business, a woman who left an abusive man and found herself in the process, and a handyman who moonlights as a standup comic.

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WYPR, NPR, AND REGIONAL NEWS

Doctors have gradually come to realize that people who survive a serious brush with death in the intensive care unit are likely to develop potentially serious problems with their memory and thinking processes.

This dementia, a side effect of intensive medical care, can be permanent. And it affects as many as half of all people who are rushed to the ICU after a medical emergency. Considering that 5.7 million Americans end up in intensive care every year, this is a major problem that until recently, has been poorly appreciated by medical caregivers.

A Missouri judge ruled on Tuesday that state election officials can no longer tell voters they must show a photo ID in order to cast a ballot. The ruling blocks part of Missouri's voter identification law.

Cole County's Judge Richard Callahan said the state cannot advertise that a photo identification is required to cast a ballot. "No compelling state interest is served by misleading local election authorities and voters into believing a photo ID card is a requirement for voting," he wrote in his ruling.

Updated at 11:08 p.m. ET

The eye of Hurricane Michael is weakening as it churns across south-central Georgia. Now a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, it made landfall around midday Wednesday in the Florida Panhandle near Panama City at Category 4 strength, with winds of 155 mph.

When people living with HIV walk out of prison, they leave with up to a month's worth of HIV medication in their pockets. What they don't necessarily leave with is access to health care or the services that will keep them healthy in the long term.

Lara Alqasem, a 22-year-old Florida native, landed at Israel's Ben-Gurion Airport last Tuesday, expecting to start her studies in human rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Instead, she has spent the past week detained.

Alqasem, whose father is of Palestinian heritage, was barred from entering the country and accused of supporting a boycott of Israel that was started by Palestinian leaders.

Passwords that took seconds to guess, or were never changed from their factory settings. Cyber vulnerabilities that were known, but never fixed. Those are two common problems plaguing some of the Department of Defense's newest weapons systems, according to the Government Accountability Office.

The flaws are highlighted in a new GAO report, which found the Pentagon is "just beginning to grapple" with the scale of vulnerabilities in its weapons systems.

Sagamore Pendry Is A Hot Spot (BBJ Story)

Oct 9, 2018

The Sagamore Pendry Baltimore in Baltimore's Fells Point neighborhood grabbed the No. 1 spot on Condé Nast Traveler's Best Hotels in the U.S. Condé Nast Traveler said it received a record-breaking number of responses from nearly a half a million readers who rated their travel experiences at hotels, resorts, cities, islands, cruise lines, airports and airlines.

Updated 10:33 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has temporarily blocked lower court orders for depositions by two senior Trump administration officials in the multiple lawsuits over the new question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census.

It's been a year since the The New York Times ran an exposé alleging sexual harassment by Hollywood executive Harvey Weinstein. That led to an outpouring of allegations as others spoke out, leading to the downfall of many leaders and executives, including top news editors at NPR.

Imagine a small, developing nation whose education system is severely lacking: schools are poorly funded, students can't afford tuition or books, fewer than half of indigenous girls even attend school — and often drop out to take care of siblings or get married.

These are the schools of rural Guatemala.

Now meet a firebrand educator who thinks he has a way to reinvent schools in Guatemala.

His school is called Los Patojos, a Spanish word used in Guatemala that means "little ones."

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