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WYPR Features

Glenn Carstens-Peters/Unsplash

A new Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies report offers insights on the promises and pitfalls faced by Baby Boomers, Millenials and Gen X. Catherine tells us more. 

@Ravens/Twitter

So, the Ravens completed their exhibition season with no blemishes on their record, a 5-0 mark, making them the only NFL team to win all their preseason games.

Now, before you run out and book plane and hotel reservations for Atlanta, the scene of February’s Super Bowl, consider this fact: The Ravens went unbeaten last exhibition season and the exhibition season before that.

And both of the succeeding regular seasons ended with the Ravens out of the playoffs.

FRIENDS OF THE PRAIRIE LEARNING CENTER AND NEAL SMITH NWR/FLICKR

The end of summer is often announced by the arrival of Goldenrod, the yellow clusters of tall stemmed flowers popping up everywhere. If you’re like me, you dread this change of season not because of the colder weather settling in but because of the dreadful allergies it brings with it. My son and I both suffer from seasonal allergies and this time of year can be the worst. Our sneezing, wheezing, coughing, and itching was thought to be a result of those yellow flowers we’ve seen sprouting up everywhere. However, while Goldenrod does produce pollen, it is falsely accused of your seasonal suffering.

Lanternflies

Sep 4, 2018
The National Aquarium

Invasive species—even tiny ones—can wreak havoc on our regional ecosystem. Listen in to learn how a little fly from Asia could cause big problems here in the Mid-Atlantic.  

Henry Barnes

Aug 31, 2018

August 12, 1955: There's traffic and chaos outside of Gordons, a popular crab carryout at Orleans Street and Patterson Park Ave. It's a typical summer scene. Gil tells us about the time Traffic Commissioner Henry Barnes put himself and his reputation smack dab in the middle of the craziness. 

William Charles, Library of Congress

During the War of 1812, Captain Peter Parker of the British Royal Navy created havoc as he and his crew sailed around the Chesapeake Bay, raiding and burning houses as troops prepared to sack Washington.

Anirban gives us the latest news on consumer sentiment, wedding economics, consumer spending, unemployment among younger Americans and climate change in economic forecasting. 

Let’s say you are in your forties and you haven’t been saving for retirement. Experts suggest that you had better get busy–now. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the average American 44 to 49 years old has a bit more than $81,000 in retirement savings. But that figure is heavily impacted by certain forty-somethings who have managed to save a lot of money for retirement already. Anirban tells us more.

Urban Planning History and Park Access in Druid Hill Park

Aug 30, 2018

How can planning with a focus on automobile transportation impact residents of a city? Graham Coreil-Allen, a public artist in Baltimore, dives into the history of Druid Hill Park’s infrastructure and the effect on African-American and Jewish residents. He talks about the lasting effects of the planning in the neighborhood, the need for physical access to the park for people who do not drive, and his efforts to increase that access.

Need a new cabernet sauvignon recommendation? Don't want to spend a fortune? Al and Hugh have you covered. Click the links to purchase their recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

Personal Creations/flickr www.personalcreations.com

There's an enormous variety of veggies out there in our Maryland markets and grocery stores.  And as students at La Schola cooking school can tell you, one of life's treats is to go shopping with Chef Jerry Pellegrino and fill your basket with whatever captures your fancy at the farmers market.

One thing you can do is whip up a vegetable-heavy summer casserole. 

Click on the image for recipes. 

 

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, a new collection of essays from public radio fan favorite David Sedaris, plus a funny new novel about life in London during the blitz from AJ Pearce.

Tom Pelton

 

A white ash tree stands beside my front porch in Baltimore -- its trunk nearly as thick as I am tall, and its branches stretching at least three times the height of my three-story house, shading one side of my roof to the other.

It’s about 200 years old, and it started growing back when this section of the city was still farmland beside a stream, decades before the Civil War.

From one of its massive branches, I hung a rope swing that my daughters flew on through the air in their white first communion dresses many springs ago, and that all my neighborhood’s children adopted as their swing.

But recently my old friend hasn’t been looking himself.   The tips of several of its high branches never grew leaves this summer.  So I called in a tree doctor: Matt Mitchelltree of North Hill Tree Experts.

“Well the tree definitely has emerald ash borer, which is an invasive insect we’ve been dealing with over the last five six years," Mitchelltree said. "It does a lot of internal damage to the plant, which causes die backs in the tips and eventual death of the tree.”

 

Baby Voices

Aug 29, 2018

“What do you think James Earl Jones sounded like as a baby? How about David Attenborough? A group of French researchers suggests that the pitch of their voices — and yours too — may have sounded when they were babies much as it does now that they’re adults. The researchers believe that the pitch of babies’ cries from as young as four-months-old can predict what their speech will sound like at five-years-old. Experts have also found that the pitch of a seven-year-old boy’s voice can likewise predict what he will sound like as an adult.”

Baker: Dolphins and the Health of the Bay

Aug 28, 2018
Michael Busada

Good news: Bottlenose dolphins are back in the Chesapeake! Will Baker, president of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, tells us how the dolphins' presence signals positive changes in the Bay. 

Chris Luczkow/flickr

My kids used to gather a bucket full of plants and twigs they foraged from our backyard and offer it to me and my wife as “soup.” While most of those ingredients were inedible, you’d be surprised how many were edible and rich in vitamins and minerals! Their favorite food to serve, and most easily harvested, was Dandelions. I can remember the shock on their faces when I put the whole thing, stem and flower, in my mouth, chewed and then swallowed.

Sharks in the Bay

Aug 28, 2018
The National Aquarium

The Chesapeake Bay, our nation’s largest estuary, is teeming with life of all sorts and sizes, which begs the question: are there sharks in the Bay? Listen to find out more.

Sean Yoes

Aug 28, 2018

Tom talks with Sean Yoes of the Afro American Newspaper. 

Sean is recommending:

Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black Cargo by Zora Neale Hurston

Sean is the author of Baltimore After Freddie Gray: Real Stories from One of America’s Great Imperiled Cities.

Hector explains the various options for dealing with high medical bills when you do not have health insurance. 

Dr. Liebe Sokol Diamond

Aug 23, 2018
Baltimore Sun Archives

What does it take to be nationally renowned surgeon? A really big brain seems essential, and Dr. Liebe Sokol Diamond certainly had that. An unwavering devotion to caring for others is also critical, and she had that, too, seemingly in limitless supply.

Anirban comments on the budget deficit, the pluses and minuses of rapid economic growth, housing affordability and rising consumer prices.

As reported by Bloomberg, each year, Vanguard Group releases its review regarding the state of retirement savings.  The review focuses on 401ks, 403bs, and other defined contribution plans that allow people to set aside money for retirement and often defer taxes in the process.  The report, entitled "How America Saves 2018," is replete with data, charts and interesting analytics.  It is also packed with some good news.

The Humanities and Young Baltimoreans

Aug 23, 2018

Published in LA Weekly and Ms. Magazine, Baltimore native Jordannah Elizabeth returned home to teach after the Baltimore uprising. She talks about the impact of her mother instilling a love for reading at a young age, her love for the humanities, and their value for a young person in Baltimore City. 

"Joshua Barney"

Aug 22, 2018
Maryland Historical Society

On August 24, 1813, during the Battle of Bladensburg, Commodore Joshua Barney and 360 sailors and 120 Marines defended Washington—fighting against the British hand-to-hand with cutlasses and pikes.

Civic Engagement

Aug 22, 2018

The political divide in America seems to be wider than ever yet civic engagement is on the rise. But how do busy parents find time to get involved? We’ve got a few ideas!   

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we preview "The Secrets Between Us," Thrity Umrigar's highly anticipated sequel to her best-seller "The Space Between Us."

@cedmull30/twitter

Let’s face it: From a sports standpoint, the calendar year 2018 has been nothing but lousy around these parts.

We certainly could use a glimmer of hope, some piece of positivity to hitch our collective Charm City wagons to.

It’s only been a couple of weeks, mind you, but newly christened center fielder Cedric Mullins shows signs of being a linchpin of a brighter Orioles future.

Al and Hugh offer suggestions for sparkling wines that are perfect for end-of-summer toasts. Click the links to purchase their recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

Tom Pelton

Maryland has experienced the rainiest year on record in more than a century, with the 43 inches falling through August 15th -- the most since 1889.

So much stormwater has been flooding down the Susquehanna River into the northern end of the Chesapeake Bay that the Exelon Power company opened several of the flood gates on the Conowingo Dam, unleashing a torrent of sediment and pollution that had been trapped behind the dam.

In the past, large rainstorms have proved devastating for the bay’s underwater grasses – which are home to blue crabs and fish and perhaps the single best indicator of the Chesapeake’s health. After Hurricane Irene and then Tropical Storm Lee hit in 2011, for example, grasses in the bay were smothered by sediment, plummeting by 44 percent over two years. That was before they then rebounded and more than doubled to more than 100,000 acres last year, the largest extent since monitoring began in the 1980s.

To get a sense of how the bay’s grasses are holding up to the historic rainfall this year, I set out in a boat from Havre De Grace on the northern Bay with Brooke Landry, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources biologist and aquatic vegetation expert with Chesapeake Bay Program.

Luca Nebuloni/flickr

During the cold of mid-winter it makes sense to warm our insides with big bowls of piping hot soup.  So, conversely, wouldn't it make sense to cool down our tummies during the summer with bowls of fresh cold soups? Chef Jerry Pellegrino of Schola Cooking School points out, so much of the summer produce can be used this way.

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