Midday | WYPR

Midday

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We begin today with an update on the results of  Tuesday’s special election in the 18th Congressional District in Pennsylvania.

Tom is joined on the line by An-Li Herring, politics and law reporter for WESA, Pittsburgh's NPR News Station. 

Now it's time for another edition of Smart Nutrition, our regular focus on healthy eating.    Here’s a question that has puzzled philosophers and poets for ages: Should a veggie burger go out of its way to taste like a beef burger, or should it embrace its veggie-ness? A new meat-free burger has taken imitation to a whole new level of flattery.

It’s called the Impossible Burger. It’s new. It’s only available in restaurants -- and not many restaurants, so far -- and it is so much like a beef hamburger that it actually bleeds when you bite into it. But it’s made from plants, not from cows. Midday’s Nutrition Diva Monica Reinagel is here to help us size up the Impossible Burger, and to talk about other items of interest in the ever-changing landscape of healthy eating. Monica is a licensed nutritionist and the author of six books who blogs at nutritionovereasy.com. She is also the creator of the weekly Nutrition Diva podcast, which has become one of iTunes' most highly ranked health and fitness podcasts since it debuted in 2008.

Bloomberg News

Tom's guests today are three innovators who are working at the frontiers of high technology -- a technology that could be moving us closer to the historic milestone futurists call the “Singularity,” when human cognition merges with machines. 

Whether it’s intelligent robotic systems for the battlefield, or biomechanical limbs that really touch and feel, or those Internet-based oracles -- think Siri, Echo and Alexa -- that are starting to run our smart homes, it’s easy to believe that the "future" is very nearly upon us.  But are we ready for it? Do we understand how these smart machines will change our lives? Do we know how to navigate safely through the complex -- and sometimes dangerous -- cyber landscape that suddenly surrounds us?

Tom's three guests will help us answer those questions.

Joining us in the studio is Tina Williams-Koroma. She’s a lawyer, entrepreneur, educator and the founder and president of TCecure, a Silver Spring, Maryland, company that provides cyber-security and network intelligence to public sector and commercial clients.

Also with us in the studio is Bob Armiger.  He is a robotics expert who leads the Biological Sciences and Engineering Group at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, where his current projects include developing neuro-prosthetic limbs that can restore full sensory function to warfighter amputees.

And joining the conversation by phone is Harris Edge.  He’s the Acting Chief of the Autonomous Systems Division of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland, and has been leading research on a variety of unmanned vehicles, drones and intelligent “limbed” machines designed to support military units, in and out of combat.

We continue our series of Conversations with Candidates, which include those who currently hold public office.  Congressman John Sarbanes joins us for the hour today.  He has represented the third congressional district since 2007. 

The Congressman was successful in his efforts to reinstate EPA funding for the Bay Journal, but Congressional Democrats have been frustrated by inaction on DACA.  Representative Sarbanes has also been working on addressing the crisis of opioid addiction, and he serves as the Chair of the Democracy Reform Task Force.   The Baltimore native currently lives in Towson. 

We are streaming all of our Conversations with the Candidates on WYPR Facebook page.

Photo courtesy: Flickr

On this edition of the Midday News Wrap:  President Trump imposed stiff tariffs yesterday, raising levies on imported steel by 25 percent and 10 percent on Aluminum. The EU responded in kind, rolling out a plan to impose their own tariffs on American made goods.

Internationally acclaimed classical guitarist, Lily Afshar performs some of her works live in Studio A.  Lily will be performing a program of music at UMBC's Linehan Hall on Saturday at 8pm in association with the Baltimore Classical Guitar Society.  

Jack Garofolo/Paris Match via Getty Images

The 1960s and 70s were a time of protest and change in America, and while marches and rallies were bringing the messages of dissent and disaffection to a world stage, movement activists were also using the marketplace to share and promote their ideas. Their unique storefronts offered politically-conscious alternatives to conventional, profit-driven business models. Today we’re going to take a closer look at those radical shops -- why many failed, some succeeded, and what impact they had on their movements.

Joining guest host Rob Sivak in the studio is Joshua Clark Davis, an assistant professor of history at the University of Baltimore and the author of a fascinating new book, From Head Shops to Whole Foods: the Rise and Fall of Activist Entrepreneurs, which chronicles the struggles, successes and legacies of those pioneering storefronts.

Later in the hour, Darius Wilmore joins the conversation to share his unique perspective on activist enterprise. Wilmore is a Baltimore-based design artist who’s produced the award-inning barber-shop style social commentary show, Fades and Fellowship, as well as the monthly storytelling series, The Short Cutz Show, rooted in the African-American and civil rights experience.  As a self-described “social impact designer” who got his start with the legendary Def Jam rap music studio 20 years ago, he has been closely involved for the past decade in the creation and evolution of a successful Baltimore business called Taharka Brothers Ice Cream, a company that has used its products, and its profits, to support programs for young African American men in Baltimore.

Photo by Tessa Sollway

It's Thursday, and Midday theater critic J, Wynn Rousuck joins guest host Rob Sivak with her weekly review of local thespian offerings.  Today, she spotlights the new production of a two-woman play by Win Wells called Gertrude Stein and a Companion, at the Fells Point Corner Theater.

Directed by Anne Hammontree and starring Marianne Gazzola Angelella as Alice B. Toklas and Andrea Bush as Gertrude Stein, the play explores the complex relationship between Stein, the celebrated American avante-garde writer, and Toklas, her lifelong companion.

Gertrude Stein and a Companion continues at the Fells Point Corner Theater through Sunday, m,arch 25th.

Like the Grand Canyon/Flickr Creative Commons

WYPR producer Jamyla Krempel hosts today’s show.

There’s been lots of talk lately about changing the narrative in Baltimore. Last month, Mayor Catherine Pugh told an audience at the Parkway Theatre that Baltimore had a “perception problem.” She also said she wanted to “work on the media not depicting Baltimore always as this negative place to be.” The Mayor’s statements got many people, including Jamyla, thinking about how Baltimore is perceived.

For the first half of the show, Jamyla welcomes two journalists who’ve spent a lot of time thinking and writing about the city. Lawrence Lanahan is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Al Jazeera, Columbia Journalism Review and other outlets. He was the creator of WYPR’s The Lines Between Us series. And he was senior producer of the WYPR show “Maryland Morning.” Lisa Snowden McCray is a longtime Baltimore journalist. She was a writer and associate editor for the Baltimore City Paper and then editor-in-chief of The Baltimore Beat, a weekly alternative paper which, sadly, ceased publication yesterday. 

Later in the show, Jamyla welcomes Al Hutchinson, the president and CEO of Visit Baltimore, and Annie Milli, the executive director of Live Baltimore to talk about Baltimore’s narrative going forward.

Photo Courtesy Marvel Studios

Black artists are enjoying more mainstream success behind the camera as well as on the screen, in roles crafted to speak to the entirety of the black experience throughout the African Diaspora.  

Perhaps no film embodies that truth more so than Black Panther.  The latest offering from the Marvel Cinematic Universe has been smashing box office records around the world, and thus far, has grossed nearly $900 million world-wide.

On today’s edition of Midday Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parks, we reflect on the history of race, representation and inclusivity in the world of comics, and how Black Panther has flipped the script on feminism in film.

From problematic caricatures steeped in racist stereotypes for the consumption of white audiences, to King T’Challa, the billion dollar box office powerhouse; it appears we are seeing an important evolution of Black comic book characters. 

Sheri Parks is an Associate Professor in the Department of American Studies at the Univ of Maryland College Park. She’s the author of Fierce Angels: Living with a Legacy from the Sacred Dark Feminine to the Strong Black Woman.

And from the studios of WBEZ in Chicago, Dr. Stanford Carpenter joins us.  He’s a cultural anthropologist, comic book creator, and scholar of comic books. He serves on the board of the annual Black Comic Arts Festival, and Pocket-con a convention that focuses on comics for young boys and girls of color.

Photo courtesy Jim Brochin for Baltimore County Executive

Today on Midday, another in our series of Conversations with the Candidates, ahead of the June 26th primary elections. 

Tom's guest today is State Senator Jim Brochin, who is one of three Democratic candidates in the primary race for Baltimore County Executive.  The current County Executive, Kevin Kamenetz, has served the maximum two terms.  He is now running for Governor.  

Senator Brochin has represented the 42nd District in central and northern Baltimore County for four terms.  He was first elected to the Senate in 2003.  He heads the Baltimore County Delegation, and serves on the Judicial Proceedings Committee, the Special Committee on Substance Abuse, and the Executive Nominations Committee.  He’s an insurance broker.  He is 54 years old, a single father with a daughter named Catherine who is attending the University of Colorado.   Senator Brochin lives in Cockeysville.

Photo Courtesy The Afro-American Newspapers

On this edition of Midday's Afro Check-In:

Frustration continues for commuters who rely on the Baltimore Metro System, following the abrupt closure of the subway system for repairs two weeks ago.  Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh adds 20 positions within her office, including the recently created Office of African American Male Engagement.

And in Annapolis, House Bill 2, which encourages minority and women participation in the state's medical marijuana industry, is advancing slowly, in the General Assembly.  Will the MD Legislative Black Caucus achieve its goal of racial diversity in Maryland's Medical Marijuana industry?  

Kamau High, Managing Editor of The Afro and Sean Yoes, Baltimore Editor and the Host of the podcast, The Afro First Edition, join Tom in Studio A. 

Stephen Voss

Today on Midday, with high winds blowing outside our Baltimore studio, we explore whether the winds of change will blow through Annapolis come November, as we begin a series of Conversations with the Candidates who will be on the June 26th primary ballots here in Maryland. 

Between now and the election, Tom Hall will be talking with Democrats who are running in the gubernatorial primary, as well as the Democrats and Republicans who are running for Baltimore County Executive, and candidates in a few other races as well. 

Today, Tom's guest for the hour is Alec Ross.  Last April, Ross became the first person to announce his candidacy in the Democratic primary for Maryland governor. Since then, eight rivals have joined him on that ballot. Alec Ross is an innovation expert, and the author of the New York Times best-selling book, “The Industries of the Future,” about innovation and the changes that economies and societies can expect over the next decade. Ross served in the State Department as Senior Advisor on Innovation to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  He also worked in the Obama campaign and transition team in 2008. He’s a former Distinguished Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins University.  He is 46 years old. He and his wife, who is a teacher in a Baltimore City School, live in Baltimore, where they are raising three children.

Today's conversation was streamed live on WYPR's Facebook page, where you can view the video of this and all future Conversations with the Candidates.

Photo courtesy oscars.org

Welcome to another edition of Midday at the Movies
The 90th Annual Academy Awards will be presented on Sunday night, hosted once again by talk show host (and social activist) Jimmy Kimmel.  Excitement about this year's awards is running high because of a notably diverse and independent crop of films, filmmakers and performers. 

On today's Midday at the Movies, we preview a bit of that excitement by offering up some predictions of Oscar glory. Two of our favorite movie mavens join Tom in the studio:  

Jed Dietz is the founder and director of the Maryland Film Festival,which runs the newly restored  SNF Parkway Theater in Baltimore.

And Max Weiss is editor-in-chief and film critic for Baltimore magazine.

Before the conversation turns to the Oscars, however, Tom and his guests discuss the cinematic phenomenon that's swept not only U.S. theaters the past three weekends, but the international film market as well: Black Panther

An Africa-centered sci-fi action-hero film produced by Marvel Studios and Walt Disney Pictures and directed by Ryan Coogler, Black Panther has been attracting massive global audiences. As of Tuesday this week, the movie's worldwide box office had reached $748.1 million, and it continues to chase records for domestic weekend ticket sales. 

Photo by Shealyn Jae

It's Thursday, and our peripatetic theater critic, J. Wynn Rousuck, joins us once again, today with her review of Count DownThe play by Dominique Cieri is being produced by The Strand Theater Company, the only Baltimore theater that presents works written exclusively by women artists.

Cieri describes the play as a composite of her experiences working for a New Jersey youth arts program, helping a group of at-risk teenage girls express themselves by creating an original musical stage production.  Cieri says her work with the girls quickly became "a labor of love, and an odyssey into the psyche of the adolescent girl."

Count Down -- directed at the Strand by Bari Hochwald -- portrays that revelation, and, in the words of the Strand's program, "exposes the inherent dissonance between the child welfare system and the reality of the girls who have no choice but to spend their childhood and adolescence in its care."

Count Down was the recipient of the 2009 Mid Atlantic Individual Playwriting Fellowship, and Finalist for Playwrights First Award, the National Arts Club, NYC.

The Strand's production of Count Down is presented as part of the DC region's 2018 Women's Voices Theatre Festival.

Count Down continues through Sunday, March 4 at The Strand Theater,  which is located at 5426 Harford Rd. Baltimore MD 21201.  Ticket info at www.strand-theater.org.

Photo by Tom Kelley/Getty Images

On this edition of the Midday Healthwatch:  a busy week for public health advocates.  Members of the Baltimore City Council voted unanimously Monday to approve a measure requiring restaurants to replace the sugary soft drinks offered in most kids’ meals with more healthful milk, juice or water -- a response to the city's rampant childhood-obesity rates. In Annapolis, advocates pressed state lawmakers for new controls on soaring prescription drug prices. They also lobbied to bolster mandatory insurance provisions of the beleaguered Affordable Care Act, and they sparred over a bill that would impose tough new conditions on the use of the life-saving anti-overdose drug Narcan, or Naloxone, by repeat opioid abusers.

Joining Tom in the studio -- and taking a break from the front lines of public health advocacy -- is  our regular guest on the Midday HealthwatchBaltimore City Health Commissioner, Dr. Leana Wen.  She talks about some of the key legislative battles being waged over public health policy, and addresses listeners' comments and questions. 

Photo courtesy: Montogomery County Board of Elections

 Republican Governor Larry Hogan has assiduously tried to distance himself from President Trump.  He has a very high approval rating and by the time the general election campaign begins after the June primary, it’s expected that he may have as much as $10 million dollars in his campaign coffers.

The challenge for MD Democrats: Choose a contender amongst the seven primary candidates who can unseat the popular Republican Governor.   The filing deadline to be on the ballot in June is tonight at 9pm.  Today on Midday, we size-up up the candidates. 

We speak with pollster Dr. Mileah Kromer, William F. Zorzi, reporter for Maryland Matters and  Ovetta Wiggins, who covers Maryland politics and government for the Washington Post.

Photo courtesy: Flickr

In the aftermath of the Parkland shooting, there was predictable and familiar outrage, but also, an eerily comfortable ease with which, as a nation, we processed this tragedy.  There have been more than 50 mass shootings and attempted mass shootings in US schools since the Columbine massacre in 1999. 

Students from across the country have organized protests and walkouts.  They have taken to social media and TV, crowded into State Houses, and confronted lawmakers in nationally televised town hall.  Has this movement, led by young survivors of gun violence, flipped the script on our national discourse about gun law reform?  

In 2013, however, after the shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman, when student protesters who called themselves Dream Defenders met with Governor Rick Scott, he did not change his position on Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” laws one bit.  One of the things that is clearly different about the debate this week, animated by young people, and the young people who protested five years ago:  the race of the protesters. 

Photo courtesy Gun News Daily

On today's edition of the Midday News Wrap, we begin with Baltimore Brew founding editor and publisher, Fern ShenThis week, the Brew published a series documenting the ballooning problem of overtime abuse in the Baltimore police department.

Then, Luke Broadwater of the Baltimore Sun and investigative reporter Alec MacGillis of ProPublica  join Tom to review some of the week’s top local and national stories, from Police Commissioner-designate Darryl De Sousa’s confirmation hearing in the City Council, and the Governor and the Mayor of Baltimore taking a victory lap following hundreds of warrant arrests, to the national debate over gun regulation that’s been re-ignited by last week’s deadly mass shooting at a Florida high school.

Photo by Britt Olsen-Ecker

There are few names or brands more deeply entrenched in the American psyche than Walt Disney. The 20th century animation pioneer built an iconic business and entertainment empire on the shoulders of a talking mouse named Mickey.  By the time of his death from lung cancer in 1966 at the age of 65, Disney and his many multi-media enterprises -- from movies to theme parks -- had become an unparalleled force in American culture. 

Now, a new show at the Single Carrot Theater in Baltimore explores a side of Mr. Disney that's in stark contrast to his benign public persona.   The production is called "A Public Reading of an Unpublished Screenplay About The Death of Walt Disney," and joining Tom to talk about it is the  company’s artistic director, renowned actress Genevieve de Mahy.  

Photo by Alyssa Eisenstein-Oxfam

Three-point-four million American citizens live on the island of Puerto Rico.  While efforts to rebuild communities in Texas and Florida after a series of deadly hurricanes last September are progressing steadily, 400,000 Puerto Ricans on the island are still without electricity, some five months after the wind and rain stopped. 

Noah Steinberg-Di Stefano has just returned from his second trip to Puerto Rico.  He’s with the Baltimore-based international aid group,  Lutheran World Relief.  He joins Tom in the studio.

Diane Jharriah-Robinson of Caritas-Antilles is working to restore stability and normalcy to the lives of the 73,000 people displaced by hurricanes on the tiny island of Dominica.  She joins us by phone from her field office in the Dominican capital, Roseau.

They give us an update on relief efforts, now that the TV cameras are long gone. 

Photo by Bill Geenan

It's Thursday, and that means theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom in the studio with her weekly review, today spotlighting a new production at Baltimore's Center Stage.

From the playwright of Detroit ’67, Skeleton Crew (the third play in Dominique Morisseau’s acclaimed Detroit Trilogy) tells the story of four workers at the last exporting auto plant in Detroit struggling to survive as their way of life disappears.  Directed by Nicole A Watson, the play's cast includes Stephanie Berry as Faye, Sekou Laidlow as Reggie, Brittany Bellizeare as Shanita, and Gabriel Lawrence as Dez, portraying a team of loyal and proud workers trying to navigate their uncertain futures.

Part of the Women’s Voices Theater Festival

Skeleton Crew continues at Baltimore's Center Stage through March 4th.

Wikimedia Commons

The Congressional Research Service estimates that about 4.3 million people hold permanent government security clearances, but many close advisers to President Trump do not -- including presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner.

Last week, Director of National Intelligence, Dan Coates, said the system of approving security clearances for top officials is “broken” and must be overhauled. 

A couple of days after Coates’ Senate testimony, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly wrote a memo outlining an overhaul of how the White House manages security-clearance investigations. In that memo, obtained by the Washington Post, some White House staffers with Top Secret interim clearances, a group that may include Kushner, will lose their clearances on Friday.

Tom’s guests today are two reporters who have been covering national security matters for years. Deb Reichmann has written about national security for the Associated Press for the past six years.  Before that, she was an AP reporter in Afghanistan. She also covered the George W. Bush White House and the final year of the Clinton White House for AP. She joins us on the line from the AP studios in Washington. 

Scott Shane is a reporter with the investigative unit of the New York Times. He’s written about national security as a reporter in the Washington bureau of the Times since 2004. He’s also the author of several books, including Dismantling Utopia, on the Soviet collapse, and Objective Troy, about the American terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki.

Karl Merton Ferron /Baltimore Sun

When Baltimore Police Commissioner Designate Darryl DeSousa appeared on Midday last Wednesday, he was quick to credit the efforts of Erricka Bridgeford, one of the founders of Baltimore Ceasefire 365, for the city’s 12 day streak with zero murders. 

It was in the days during and after the third Ceasefire weekend that began on February 2nd, that Baltimore experienced no homicides for nearly two weeks, the first time that has happened in our city since 2015.  Since then, three men have been killed: Sadik Griffin, John Townes, Jr., and Sean Sewell.    

Erricka Bridgeford cares about the disheartening data, but she also cares about the individuals who’ve lost their lives, and the devastating effects their deaths have on their families, their neighborhoods, and their communities.  She joins us today in Studio A. 

The efforts of Baltimore Cease Fire 365 to stem the tide of violence in Baltimore are on-going and next Ceasefire weekend is scheduled for Mother’s Day weekend, in May.

www.morgan.edu

Governor Hogan’s recent offer of $100 million dollars to settle the 12 year-old lawsuit filed by the state’s HBCU’s against the Maryland Higher Education Commission, was met with hope by some, and incredulity by others as the state admitted that the cost of reversing the legacy of discriminatory funding practices would actually cost billions. 

Debora Bailey, reporter for the AFRO Newspaper, and Dr. Earl Richardson, President Emeritus of Morgan State University, are in Studio A to discuss the road ahead for the Maryland’s Historically Black Institution.

 

Office of the Governor

Today, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan joins Tom live in Studio A.  He is one of only two Republicans elected to our state’s highest office in the last 50 years, and in a poll released last month by Gonzales Media and Research, 71% of MD voters said they approve of the job the Governor is doing.  While there is no shortage of Democrats vying for the chance to face the Governor in the general election in November, Mr. Hogan leads all of them in head-to-head match-ups at this early stage in the campaign. 

Calling for bipartisanship and cooperation in his State of the State Address last month, the Governor points to education funding and accountability, re-districting, and the environment as some of his top priorities.  Tom discusses some of those issues during his 30-minute interview with Mr. Hogan. 

Later, Maryland and government reporter for The Daily Record, Bryan Sears, joins us on the line with the latest from Annapolis and reaction to the Governor's remarks. 

AP Photo by Wilfredo Lee

Joining Tom for the NewsWrap today are White House correspondents Ayesha Rascoe of Reuters and Tamara Keith of NPR.   

In the wake of another massacre at an American high school, politicians who oppose any move toward gun regulation are keeping the families in Parkland, Florida in their thoughts and prayers, and keeping the NRA satisfied that no significant changes to federal gun policy are likely.

The Senate fails to find a fix for DACA, and resignation of White House aide Robert Porter’s raises questions about how casually President Trump and his staff handle top secret intelligence. 

Nearly 40% of the President’s original picks for his cabinet have been involved in ethical controversies in the last year.  The latest is the head of the Veterans Administration.

Ayesha Rascoe and Tamara Keith join us on the line from NPR studios in Washington, D.C.

Photo by Katie Simmons-Barth

Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins us today with reviews of two plays now running in the region:  Red Velvet, by the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, and All She Must Possess, a world premiere at Rep Stage, on the Howard Community College campus.

Chesapeake Shakespeare's Red Velvet (profiled on Midday's January 31st showtells the story of Ira Aldridge, a celebrated and controversial African American actor who won international renown for his groundbreaking portrayal of Shakespeare's Othello at a London theater in 1833.  The play by Lolita Chakrabati is directed by Shirley Basfield Dunlap, and features Christian R. Gibbs as Ira Aldridge and Yuri Lomakin as a London theater manager.

All She Must Possess, directed at the Rep Stage by Joseph Ritsch, is the world premiere of a play by Susan McCully, who portrays the lives of Baltimore's Victorian-era Cone sisters -- Dr. Claribel and Etta Cone.  The iconic pair's passion for collecting art and curios from around the world brings them into the rarified company of many of the artistic and literary geniuses of their day, including avant-garde writer Gertrude Stein.

Red Velvet at Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, and All She Must Possess at Rep Stage in Columbia, both continue through February 25.

It’s  Midday on Music and today we explore  music as a window into Muslim Culture, and the creative work of Muslim women, who are being celebrated in a series at the Creative Alliance in Baltimore this season called Nisa’a Women.  My guests this afternoon are Sudanese singer Alsarah and her band The Nubatones.  The group is in town as the second installment in the Nisa’a Women series.  They are conducting workshops at local schools, they’ll be at a community potluck for refugee and immigrant communities and they will give a concert at the Creative Alliance tomorrow night.

Later on, a discussion about the growing popularity of Contemporary African music. Despite Hip Hop  and Afrobeats artists dominating music charts around the world, they were not well represented at this year’s Grammy awards.  Stephanie Shonekan, University of Missouri Associate Professor of Black Studies and Ethnomusicologist, joins us on the telephone to discuss who wins awards, who doesn’t and  why.  

Baltimore Police Department

Tom's guest today is the newly appointed chief of the Baltimore Police DepartmentDarryl De Sousa is the Commissioner-Designate.  His confirmation hearing at the Baltimore City Council is slated for a week from today.  Mr. De Sousa has been on the job for less than a month, but he’s been a member of the Baltimore Police Department for more than 30 years.  Prior to his elevation to Commissioner, he served as the top commander in the patrol bureau. 

Mr. De Sousa takes the reins of the department as it is reeling from revelations that surfaced at the trial of two officers who were convicted Monday night on racketeering and fraud charges.  Ironically, and much to everyone’s delight, for 12 consecutive days, as the trial was underway, Baltimore experienced no new homicides.  Ericka Bridgeford, the founder of Baltimore Ceasefire, tells us that the city hasn’t gone that long without a homicide since 2014.  The Baltimore Sun reported that an unidentified man was shot and killed in Belair Edison yesterday afternoon, in a district that the Commissioner Designate served as Commander years ago.

Against the backdrop of a city still beset by crime, hopeful of a turnaround, and in urgent need of a police force it can trust, Darryl DeSousa joins Tom in Studio A.

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