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News and Commentary from WYPR's award winning newsroom.

Mary Rose Madden

Since two women sued the University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore County and others earlier this month for allegedly failing to properly investigate their reports of sexual assault, others have come forward with similar complaints.

Thursday, students crowded into an auditorium on campus to tell UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski and other college administrators about the problems they’ve had trying to report sexual assaults.

They lined up in the aisles for their chance at the microphone to open up about what they said were horrifying events in their life.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Federal prosecutors in Maryland indicted three men today on charges of bilking more than 400 investors of $364 million in an elaborate Ponzi scheme. The victims were small business owners, professional athletes, doctors and lawyers in Maryland and throughout the nation.

John Lee

A new study finds it will take up to about $630 million for Baltimore County to fix overcrowding in its high schools. 

 

There are three proposals that address both crowded schools and building conditions.

 

 

A new Goucher Poll released Tuesday has Gov. Larry Hogan leading Democratic challenger Ben Jealous by 22 points, despite high levels of support in Maryland for progressive policies.

Two women are suing the University of Maryland Baltimore County, the Baltimore County Police, and the Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Office – among others – for allegedly failing to investigate their reports of rape.

In the complaint, filed Sept. 10 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, the women, former students, allege they were raped in separate incidents in 2015 and 2017, but that officials at the university failed to take them seriously and that the police classified their reports as "unfounded."

Dominique Maria Bonessi

The Baltimore City Council was back in session Monday evening with a long list of new legislation. Morning Edition's Host Nathan Sterner speaks with Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi about what happened.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

The Filbert Street Garden sits just inside the city line in south Baltimore’s Brooklyn neighborhood. Among the ducks and chickens that call the garden home, there are flower beds, a greenhouse, bee hives, and—tucked away in the far back corner—the composting bins.

BelindaMarie pix via Flickr

After one of the wettest summers on record—Baltimore received more than two-and-a-half times the normal rainfall from June 1 to August 4 this year—we’re into hurricane season. And although Hurricane Florence may not be as bad for Maryland as originally predicted, it’s still expected to add to the state’s rainfall total.

That’s another surge of fresh water in a Chesapeake Bay that already is feeling the effects of all that rain.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Baltimore City’s Liquor Board Waverly Tavern’s liquor license for a week and fined the establishment $2,500 Thursday afternoon.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Second of two parts

Shekhar Karki has owned Waverly Tavern, a bar and liquor store in north Baltimore, for four years.

“It’s a good business,” he says. “That is what I thought before starting.”

Jessica Bakeman

Some student survivors of the February high school shooting in Parkland, Fla., spent the summer getting therapy in the form of music, theater and art activities.

Camp Shine, a free arts therapy program, was held at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School — and later, at a middle school next door — in Parkland. But the glue connecting the people behind the scenes was Baltimore.

John Lee

The candidates running for Baltimore County Executive debated for the first time Tuesday, and they differed over whether to provide universal prekindergarten and free community college tuition. 

 

How they answered those questions crystallizes how they are running their campaigns.

 

 

A. Currell / Flickr / Creative Commons

First of two parts

Residents of at least 10 Baltimore communities say a proliferation of bars and liquor stores has led to an increase in crime in their neighborhoods and they want the city’s board of liquor license commissioners to do something about it.

But liquor board members say there isn’t much they can do because of state law, which frustrates folks like Marvin “Doc” Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Community Association.

Mary Rose Madden / wypr

They came in the rain, soaked from head to foot: some with face paint dripping down, some dressed in matching jumpsuits or some,  just in simple t-shirts and shorts. And they came with their toilet bowl race cars - yes, toilet bowl race cars...exquisitely engineered to roll down Chestnut Ave. in Hampden one after another, like a parade displaying Baltimore’s sense of humor.

Twenty-three pilots boarded their homemade toilet bowl vessels and zoomed down the street while crowds dressed in rain gear and carrying umbrellas cheered them on.

Rachel Baye

Let’s say you buy a new TV for $500 dollars. Maryland’s current 6-percent sales tax would add $30 on top of that.

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Ben Jealous announced Thursday that if elected, he would cut the state sales tax to 5.75 percent, saving you $1.25 on that TV purchase.

John Lee

The two candidates running for Baltimore County Executive agree on this: it’s going to cost a lot to modernize the schools. 

 

There’s another thing they have in common:  Republican Al Redmer and Democrat Johnny Olszewski aren’t providing many details on how to pay for promises they’re making.

 

 

Dominique Maria Bonessi

 

Tuesday’s 105-degree heat index kept 10 Baltimore County schools without air conditioning closed on the first day of the school year. In Baltimore City, more than 60 schools dismissed students early — some before noon — as a result of the heat.

The lack of air conditioning is part of a larger political fight over school funding.

@Ravens/Twitter

So, the Ravens completed their exhibition season with no blemishes on their record, a 5-0 mark, making them the only NFL team to win all their preseason games.

Now, before you run out and book plane and hotel reservations for Atlanta, the scene of February’s Super Bowl, consider this fact: The Ravens went unbeaten last exhibition season and the exhibition season before that.

And both of the succeeding regular seasons ended with the Ravens out of the playoffs.

Flickr

Public schools are opening across the state Tuesday.

 

The academic year begins with Baltimore County officials grappling with how to keep the district’s roughly 114,000 students safe.

 

 

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Six-year-old Emily shows off the colors in her sidewalk drawing.

“Pink! Yellow!” Emily exclaims. “Blue, purple, pink!”

Her rainbow tie-dye dress matches the piles of chalk at her feet. Her bangs stick to her forehead on this muggy August evening.

Mary Rose Madden / wypr


An independent panel of experts released the findings from its investigation into the death of Det. Sean Suiter. After hundreds of hours of analysis, they’ve come to the conclusion that the officer died by suicide.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

When police found Detective Sean Suiter shot dead in Harlem Park last November, they cordoned off the neighborhood as they searched for the shooter. Residents had to show ID to get in or out.

Tom Moore

Researchers at the Maryland State Archives rolled out their latest findings on the Maryland 400, the Revolutionary War unit that fought at the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776, at the State House Sunday.

Their project, called “Finding the Maryland 400,” includes detailed biographies that tell some of the soldiers’ stories for the first time. And they announced it with fanfare, featuring a color guard in revolutionary war uniforms marching into the historic state house.

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

 

Never having met John McCain, my guess is the former Arizona senator, who died Saturday night, would find much of what has been said about him since his death, amusing, as if to say, geez, I wish you had loved me this much when I was still here on Earth.

But one of the under-reported parts of McCain’s legacy was his impact on sports.

The so-called maverick and engineer of the straight talk express didn’t hesitate to exert his influence on athletics. But unlike a lot of politicians who look like preening schmoes when they try to mix it up in sports, McCain was authentic in an athletic milieu.

EA Sports Gaming

Authorities have identified David Katz as the gunman that killed two people and injured 11 others before taking his own life at a video game tournament in Jacksonville, Florida, Sunday afternoon. The 24-year-old was a Maryland resident.

Baltimore County

 

Fomer Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance was released from jail Monday after serving four months for perjury.

 

In a series of tweets Monday morning, Dance apologized. Dance said he is ready to begin a new chapter in the book of life. 

 

 

 

 

Tom Moore

Historians at the Maryland State Archives are piecing together new information on the soldiers of the Maryland 400, the Revolutionary War outfit that fought in the Battle of Brooklyn in August 1776.

They’re learning more about the lives of some of those soldiers whose vastly outnumbered unit took heavy losses in the first and biggest battle of the war holding off the British while the rest of George Washington’s army regrouped at Brooklyn Heights.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Most of the restaurants in Baltimore City are operating without annual health department inspections; there just aren’t enough inspectors to go around. That’ s according to an audit released Wednesday morning at the Board of Estimates meeting.

@cedmull30/twitter

Let’s face it: From a sports standpoint, the calendar year 2018 has been nothing but lousy around these parts.

We certainly could use a glimmer of hope, some piece of positivity to hitch our collective Charm City wagons to.

It’s only been a couple of weeks, mind you, but newly christened center fielder Cedric Mullins shows signs of being a linchpin of a brighter Orioles future.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Jarrod Ramos, the man accused in the Capital Gazette shootings, appeared in court Monday for the first time since his arrest in June.

He sat slumped over in his chair at the defense table during the morning hearing wearing dark green hospital scrubs, socks and prison shower sandals and had shackles around his ankles. He only spoke in a whisper to his lawyer, William Davis.

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