Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast (Archive) | WYPR

Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast (Archive)

NO LONGER AIRS

You can find the archive of Maryland Morning with Tom Hall as host here.

This program aired with Sheilah Kast as host until 10/2/15.  Find out more about us, check out shows that aired prior to February 2014, listen to our series, and listen to each day's show.

Etiquette in the 21st Century Workplace

Feb 19, 2014
Twist Photography

There can be many pitfalls in the 21st century workplace, such as replying to emails you didn't mean to, having a relationship with a colleague. Baltimore County author Richie Frieman addresses many of them in his book Reply All and Other Ways to Tank Your Career

redwolfoz / Creative Commons

About a third of emergency room visits in Maryland could have been handled in a primary care setting. Will the Affordable Care Act change that... and, if so, when?

Britt Olsen-Ecker

For 30 years Mrs. K taught piano to children in her living room, but now she may have to confront the reality that the days spent teaching in her home, were not as innocent as she remembers.

Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck reviews "The Piano Teacher" at Rep Stage in Columbia.

Jamyla Kay

Chef Sascha Wolhandler gives us her picks for the best recipes to warm you and your partners' bellies and hearts-whether you are celebrating Valentine's Day a few days late--or it's just a normal night of the week!

Vicki Schassler shoveled the sidewalk in front of Spirits of Mount Vernon in Baltimore.
Stephanie Hughes

The heavy snow closed most schools and many offices yesterday. But some people had to work… someone had to clear the roads and sidewalks.  It raises a very unromantic question on this Valentine’s Day: what’s the economic impact of a winter storm?

Helping Elders During a Snowstorm

Feb 14, 2014
Compfight / Creative Commons

Maryland has been hit by heavy snow over the past two days.  How do our older neighbors plan for and deal with this kind of weather?  Sheilah Kast asks Judah Ronch, Dean of the Erickson School at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Ericka Blount Danois is a Baltimore-based journalist and author who's written for Spin, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, ESPN The Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and many other publications.

Data set of toll transactions in Maryland via data.maryland.gov
data.maryland.gov

What can Maryland do to make the data it collects more accessible to you? How could you use it? We talk with State Senator Bill Ferguson about creating a new Open Data Policy for Maryland.

MICA

The Maryland Institute College of Art announced yesterday that Samuel Hoi will become the new president of the acclaimed art school in July.  Mr. Hoi has been the President of the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles since 2000. 

Hoi will succeed Fred Lazarus, IV, who has held the reins at MICA for the past 36 years.  Samuel Hoi joins Tom Hall on the phone from Los Angeles. 

Are ACOs Changing the Way Doctors Work Together?

Feb 11, 2014
a.drian / Creative Commons
a.drian / Creative Commons

Today, on the Checkup, we look at Accountable Care Organizations, or ACOs. Those are groups of independent providers in a particular community who join together to coordinate care—and to save money.  ACOs can include hospitals, physicians, and specialists. 

Editor B/flickr

Maryland is one of 45 states that has adopted what’s called the Common Core standards for curriculum in public schools.  The Maryland State Board of Education adopted them in June 2010, but this is the school year the standards are being implemented – and the movement against them by some parents and teachers is building steam.

Tech Check!

Feb 10, 2014
Credit: martwork / Stock.xchng / Creative Commons
martwork / Stock.xchng / Creative Commons

It's our regular "Tech Check" with Andrew Zaleski, lead reporter for the tech news website, Technically Baltimore. He joins Nathan Sterner in the studio.

Meg Hughes

Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck says "The Golden Spike" playwright R.M. O'Brien condenses "a bit of the Wild West, a bit of silent movies, a bit of Native American legend, a bit of Mormon theology, a bit of American Capitalism, and the epic of Gilgamesh" into a 95-minute format.

What The Iditarod Can Teach You About Math

Feb 10, 2014
Bob Wick, BLM California / Creative Commons
Bob Wick, BLM California / Creative Commons

Jen Reiter, a third grade teacher at the Gilman School in North Baltimore, will be heading to Anchorage, Alaska, on Friday to participate in the 2014 Iditarod, the nearly 1,000-mile race through the Alaskan wilderness from Anchorage to Nome. She won’t be one of the mushers, but rather, she has been chosen to be this year’s “Teacher on the Trail.”  Jen Reiter joins Tom Hall in the studio to tell us what that will entail.

It's a classic boy meets horse, boy loses horse, boy goes into a war to find horse story.

Maryland Morning theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck has been to see War Horse now up at The Hippodrome. She brings us her review of the National Theatre of Great Britain's production. 

Dwight Watkins
Dwight Watkins

Baltimore writer Dwight Watkins published a piece in the online magazine Salon this week about the isolating effects of poverty in the East Baltimore neighborhoods where he grew up. Sheilah Kast talks with him about how some in East Baltimore are "too poor for pop culture."

Why HIV-Positive Teens Aren't Getting Tested

Feb 5, 2014
Stephanie Hughes

Many teenagers with HIV are not getting treatment for the disease until the virus is in advanced stages.  That’s the finding of a study published this week in the journal Pediatrics.  It was a retrospective study of 13 clinic sites around the country, including one in Baltimore.  They looked at new patients ages 12 to 24.  They looked at teenagers who were infected through behavior, not those who became positive at birth. 

Church of the Messiah burning at Fayette and Gay Streets
Public Domain

  One-hundred ten years ago this Friday, Baltimore could be seen as a glow in the night sky for miles around the city. It wasn’t the city lights that generated the glow but a wind-stoked fire that ravaged much of the city’s downtown. The Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 is considered the third worst fire to hit an American city and it shaped downtown in ways still visible today.

Stan Barouh

The Everyman Theater’s production of Crimes of the Heart marks the company’s one year anniversary in its new home on Fayette Street in the Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District on Baltimore’s West Side. Written by Beth Henley, Crimes of the Heart is a play about three sisters in Hazlehurst, Mississippi. This morning, we talk with the three sisters who star in the play: Beth Hylton, Dorea Schmidt and Megan Anderson.

Jamyla Kay

Every year more than 50,000 refugees and asylees enter the United States, and hundreds resettle in Maryland. 

On today’s edition of The Checkup, we hear from refugees and service providers about the changes to refugees' healthcare and the unique health challenges that many face.

How DJ Spooky Turns Ice Into Music

Feb 4, 2014
Flickr / Creative Commons
J.D. Lasica / Creative Commons

Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky, is a multimedia artist who works as a composer, editor, and author. He has developed music, film and experimental projects with a number of artists from across the United States and the world. This spring, he is an artist-in-residence at the Maryland Institute College of Art here in Baltimore. He’s teaching a course at MICA, and working on a new multimedia opera that will receive its premiere in the fall of this year. DJ Spooky joins Tom Hall to talk about what drives his music and creativity.

Credit: Kevin Elliott / The National Guard / Creative Commons
Kevin Elliott

This morning, we examine the priorities of the Maryland Veterans Caucus. Maryland is home to just under 500,000 veterans, and for insight into the issues they’re facing, Tom Hall talks with State Senator Douglas Peters.

“Magic is what people call it when the universe corrects itself,” says one of the characters in Laurel Snyder’s new book.  We met Laurel Snyder, who was born in Baltimore, about two years ago, when we talked about her book for kids, Bigger than a Bread Box.  It’s a book about families with a dose of magic. 

Imagine if a movie was being filmed in a Maryland city or town, and 350 extras were picked to share the screen with the actors and actresses. Then imagine that one of the extras comes up with his own idea for a movie, starring the extras.

Full of Chips, But Not of Football-Fueled Excitement

Feb 3, 2014
Anderson Mancini
Anderson Mancini

We are filled with tortilla chips and dip, though not reveling in the exciting football game from this weekend.  The Seattle Seahawks beat the Denver Broncos 43-8 in a game that was never in question.  

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