UBLaw Prof. Kim Wehle: The US Supreme Court's New Term, New Challenges | WYPR

UBLaw Prof. Kim Wehle: The US Supreme Court's New Term, New Challenges

Oct 5, 2020

The Supreme Court building in Washington, DC. Because of COVID-19, the justices will continue to hear oral arguments in the new term by phone conference.
Credit US Supreme Court

It’s been 17 days since Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg succumbed to cancer at the age of 87. Ginsburg was a heroic figure for millions of Americans: as the Notorious RBG, she was an icon of liberal grace, resilience and reason.   A week after Ginsburg’s death, President Trump announced his pick for her replacement – conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett, whom Trump named to the 7th Circuit court three years ago.

Judge Barrett will be questioned by the Senate Judiciary Committee during four days of hearings set to begin next Monday, with a full Senate vote on her confirmation possible before the end of October, although that timetable could be upset by the Coronavirus.  Two Republican senators on the Judiciary Committee, Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina, have tested positive for the virus.  Both attended the event at the White House in which Judge Barrett was introduced as Mr. Trump’s nominee.  At least four other people who attended that event have also tested positive...

Kim Wehle is an author, constitutional scholar and professor at University of Baltimore School of Law.
Credit Tim Coburn Photography

Today on Midday --  on this First Monday in October and the first day of the Supreme Court’s new term -- we’ll consider the political turmoil surrounding the Barrett nomination, some of the big cases that the court will decide this term, and the possible role the court might play in a contested presidential election.

Joining us for the hour on Zoom is Kim Wehle, a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, and a former Assistant U.S. Attorney.  She is a legal expert for CBS News and the author of two excellent books, How to Read the Constitution—and Why, and What You Need to Know About Voting — and Why