Emily Sullivan | WYPR

Emily Sullivan

Reporter, City Hall

Emily Sullivan is a city hall reporter at WYPR, where she covers all things Baltimore politics.  She joined WYPR after reporting for NPR’s national airwaves.  There, she was a reporter for NPR’s news desk, business desk and presidential conflicts of interest team.  Sullivan won a national Edward R. Murrow Award for an investigation into a Trump golf course's finances alongside members of the Embedded team. 

Sullivan has also reported on health and education for WAMU in Washington, D.C..  She got her start in public radio as an intern at WNYC.  Sullivan also interned at The Village Voice, where she produced a music festival.  She holds bachelor’s degrees in psychology and women's, gender, and sexuality studies from Fordham University.

In her spare time, she enjoys biking, watching Jeopardy and defending the honor of New Jersey, her home state.

A knife-wielding woman stabbed 14 children at a kindergarten in the Chinese city of Chongqing on Friday, according to police statements.

The attack took place as children were returning to classes, according to The Associated Press.

Sphen and Magic, a pair of male gentoo penguins at Sea Life Sydney Aquarium in Australia, are the proud new dads of a 91-gram chick, the aquarium has announced.

Updated at 9:19 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged a Florida man on Friday in connection with a wave of improvised explosive devices sent to political critics of President Trump.

Cesar Altieri Sayoc, 56, is facing five federal charges after he was arrested in Plantation, Fla., following a national investigation. He faces a potential total of 48 years in prison.

Stock markets in Japan, Hong Kong and South Korea experienced sharp losses Thursday on the heels of Wednesday's 608-point plunge in the Dow Jones that wiped out gains for the year.

Japan's benchmark Nikkei index plunged nearly 4 percent. Hong Kong's Hang Seng, affected by declines in semiconductor-makers and other tech shares, fell nearly 2.5 percent before ultimately recovering and closing down 1 percent.

Elsewhere in Asia, South Korea's stock exchange fell 2 percent. India's Sensex fell nearly a percentage point.

Former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak has been charged with multiple counts of criminal breach of trust involving his alleged misuse of funds totaling the equivalent of $1.58 billion.

Najib was charged alongside Irwan Serigar Abdullah, Malaysia's former treasury secretary-general, according to Reuters. The two pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to all charges.

Four Southern California men, allegedly part of a white supremacist group, have been charged by federal prosecutors for violent attacks on counterprotesters, journalists and a police officer at political rallies across the state.

Three of the four are in custody.

The New York Times reports that Robert Rundo, 28 was taken into custody on Sunday at the Los Angeles International Airport after fleeing to Central America earlier this month.

Washington, D.C.'s attorney general has opened a civil investigation into the Catholic archdiocese of Washington, days after the church released a list of 31 priests "credibly accused" of sexual abuse.

Updated at 4:37 p.m. ET

The American opioid crisis is far from over, but early data indicate the number of deaths are beginning to level off, according to Alex Azar, secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, citing "encouraging" results in overdose trends.

In a speech on Tuesday at a Milken Institute health summit, Azar walked through statistics suggesting deaths were plateauing and he highlighted efforts he says may be turning the tide in the drug epidemic.

Updated 5 a.m. ET

A weakened Willa has been downgraded to a tropical depression after landfall as a Category 3 hurricane in Western Mexico, even as "life-threatening storm surge, wind and rainfall" persist in the region, the National Hurricane Center says.

Updated 8:53 a.m. ET

A winning Mega Millions ticket for a $1.537 billion lottery — one of the largest ever — was sold in South Carolina, according to the South Carolina Education State Lottery.

The stunning lump-sum cash payout, should the lucky winner choose to take it: nearly $878 million.

The drawing was at 11 p.m. ET Tuesday, and the odds of holding the winning ticket were about 1 in 302 million.

The Museum of the Bible said Monday that five of its 16 famous Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are fake.

A team of German experts analyzed the privately funded Washington, D.C., museum's fragments and found they had "characteristics inconsistent with ancient origin." The fragments will no longer be displayed at the museum.

An explosive device was found at the Westchester County, New York, home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros on Monday afternoon.

In a statement to NPR, the Bedford Police Department said an employee of the house found a suspicious package in the mailbox. They opened it, revealing what "appeared to be an explosive device." The employee placed the package in a nearby wooded area and alerted authorities.

Updated 11:01 p.m. ET

Hurricane Willa, which is a Category 3 storm, made landfall near Isla del Bosque, Sinaloa, in Western Mexico.

Willa is "extremely dangerous" and bringing "life-threatening storm surge, wind and rainfall" to Mexico's Pacific Coast, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison issued a national apology Monday on behalf of the government to survivors of institutional child sexual abuse — the first such official statement since a major report last year showed the problem was rampant in Australia.

"Today, as a nation, we confront our failure to listen, to believe, and to provide justice," he said to an audience of hundreds of survivors in Canberra. "We say sorry. To the children we failed, sorry. To the parents whose trust was betrayed and who have struggled to pick up the pieces, sorry."

Updated 8:47 p.m. ET

Hurricane Willa, an "extremely dangerous" storm heading to Mexico's Pacific coast, was downgraded from a Category 5 to a Category 4 by the National Hurricane Center on Monday.

The storm, with maximum sustained winds of nearly 150 mph, is about 100 miles west from Cabo Corrientes, a municipality in southwest Mexico. It is moving north at 8 mph, according to the NHC's latest advisory.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

Saudi Arabian officials confirmed the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who had been missing for 18 days, in a statement issued Saturday morning local time.

The statement, translated into English by the Saudi Press Agency, said a preliminary investigation into the events of Oct. 2 revealed that Khashoggi was killed in a fight that broke out while he was visiting the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

Dr. Reginald Archibald was a pediatric specialist of growth and maturation. For decades, he treated children too small for their age at The Rockefeller University Hospital in New York. Now, that hospital is saying he abused at least one of them — and possibly others.

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

StarKist Co. has reportedly agreed to plead guilty to charges of price fixing as part of a conspiracy with two of its competitors to keep the price of canned tuna high.

Federal prosecutors announced the plea agreement on Thursday, which includes a fine of up to $100 million, according to The Associated Press. In the same deal, a former StarKist executive and two former Bumble Bee Foods executives pleaded guilty to price fixing.

A hologram depicting Amy Winehouse, the British singer whose music, addictions and premature death dominated headlines, is expected to embark on a tour, according to Reuters.

Norway issued an apology on Wednesday to women who faced retaliation and public disgrace for having relationships with occupying German forces during World War II.

Up to 50,000 Norwegian women are thought to have had intimate relationships with German soldiers, the BBC reports. Many of them faced government retaliation after the war's end, including illegal arrests, job firings and being stripped of their nationality.

Steve Penny, the former president of USA Gymnastics who has been accused of covering up sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nassar, was arrested Wednesday over allegations that he tampered with evidence related to a Nassar investigation.

If convicted, Penny could receive two to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

He was arrested in Gatlinburg, Tenn., after a Texas indictment dated Sept. 28 called for his arrest.

Mohammad Imran, the man convicted of raping and murdering 7-year-old Zainab Ansari and killing at least seven other children in Pakistan, was executed on Wednesday at a prison in the eastern city of Lahore.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with Turkish leaders Wednesday amid the diplomatic crisis over the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and says President Recep Tayyip Erdogan "made clear that the Saudis had cooperated" with Turkey's investigation.

People who were born in New York City and do not identify as male or female can now select the gender-neutral designation of X on their birth certificates.

Mayor Bill de Blasio signed the provision into law last week. In 2014, the city passed a law that removed the requirements of surgery and legal name-change for transgender people who wished to change the gender designated on their birth certificate from female to male or male to female.

Starting Wednesday, the sale of recreational marijuana begins in Canada following a law passed over the summer.

The law says anyone in Canada over the age of 18 is allowed to possess marijuana, provided it's less than 30 grams — just over an ounce. Canadians can also grow up to four marijuana plants in their home and buy from a provincially regulated retailer.

Updated at 8:37 p.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has arrived in Saudi Arabia after being dispatched by President Trump to meet with members of the royal court amid growing international tension over the disappearance of prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Khashoggi, an outspoken critic of Saudi policy, has not been seen since he entered the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul two weeks ago.

The U.S. Embassy in Australia issued a lighthearted apology on Monday for an invitation to a "cat pajama-jam" featuring a photo of a cat dressed as the Sesame Street character Cookie Monster that was accidentally sent out by email.

The email, reportedly sent from the State Department, featured some Latin text and an RSVP button to the event, according to The Australian Associated Press.

The Catholic archdiocese of Washington, D.C., has released a list of 31 clergymen who have been "credibly accused" of abusing children over a decades-long period — a move that comes just days after Pope Francis accepted the resignation of Archbishop Cardinal Donald Wuerl for allegedly covering up sexual abuse in the Church.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis "could" be considering a departure, Saudis can expect "severe punishment" for any involvement in the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi, and climate change is probably real, but not caused by man, President Trump said in an interview aired Sunday on CBS' 60 Minutes.

Sears — the iconic American retailer that has sold everything from clothing and toys to refrigerators and socket wrenches over its more than 125-year history — may have reached the end. The Sears Holdings company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on Monday after failing to make a $134 million debt payment.

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