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Olszewski Chides School System For Not Saying More About Cyberattack

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John Lee
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Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olzewski said Monday he has as many questions as the public when it comes to the cyberattack last week on the Baltimore County Schools.

Olszewski said the school system needs to do a better job of communicating with him and with the residents of Baltimore County.

“I know that it is something that is deeply frustrating to both our parents and our students and our educators,” Olszewski said. “I get it. Everyone’s right to have questions and they deserve answers from the school system as soon as possible.”

School officials have provided few details about the attack, which has shut down virtual learning for its 115,000 students through at least Tuesday. Officials say they can’t disclose too much because there is an ongoing criminal investigation.

When it comes to getting instruction up and running, Olszewski said he has available people in IT and other areas who can lend a hand to help repair the damage done, if asked.

“We certainly have more resources that can be brought to bear to help lead a response that has not yet been activated,” Olszewski said. “We’ll continue making ourselves available and we’ll keep pushing the school system to give us more information as well as the public.”

School system spokesman Charles Herndon tells a different story. He said they are working closely with the county executive’s office.

“They actually have been a great help, in helping us get out information and both of our IT teams working together to resolve this,” Herndon said.

Herndon said the school system hopes to have instruction available again in a matter of days, but cautioned this remains a fluid event.

“We are making progress,” Herndon said.

The school system is providing updates around 5 pm each day at bcps.org.

Herndon said restoring instruction is the priority, and they are exploring various options, including other virtual platforms that could be used.

“It may have a different look, a different feel, a different platform,” Hendon said. “It depends on what we are able to do between now and the time we’re able to get students back learning again.”

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