Amita Kelly | WYPR

Amita Kelly

Donald Trump now has the support of 1,238 delegates — just a hair above the 1,237 threshold needed to clinch the Republican presidential nomination, according to The Associated Press.

The National Rifle Association endorsed Donald Trump on Friday, just before the apparent Republican nominee addressed its annual conference in Louisville, Ky.

"To get the endorsement, believe me, is a fantastic honor," Trump said, adding that he and his sons are members of the NRA. "They're much better shooters than I am," he said.

"They have so many rifles and so many guns, I tell you, sometimes even I get a little concerned," Trump said.

Despite badly lagging in the delegate count, Bernie Sanders' campaign manager told NPR the campaign believes Sanders can and will be the Democratic nominee by winning over superdelegates at the 11th hour.

This post was updated on June 6.

Hillary Clinton, now the presumptive presidential nominee for the Democratic Party, has become the first woman to top a major U.S. political party ticket. An updated count from The Associated Press shows that she now has support from the 2,383 delegates needed to clinch the nomination.

In his victory speech Tuesday night, having swept all five primary states that voted, Donald Trump made a comment about Hillary Clinton that went viral on social media.

"Well, I think the only card she has is a woman's card," he said. "She's got nothing else going on. And frankly if Hillary Clinton were a man, I don't think she'd get 5 percent of the vote. The only thing she's got going is the women's vote. And the beautiful thing is women don't like her, OK?"

President Obama, in London to meet with the British prime minister, joked that he "warmed up" for those meetings this morning playing Prince's "Purple Rain" and "Delirious."

Obama has long been a fan of the musician, who died yesterday at the age of 57.

The president said he is staying at the U.S. ambassador's residence and "it so happens our ambassador has a turntable, and so this morning we played 'Purple Rain' and 'Delirious' just to get warmed up before we left the house for important bilateral meetings like this."

Following widespread irregularities at polls in Brooklyn Tuesday, New York City officials are calling for major reforms at the Board of Elections.

The problem was first identified in a an analysis of state voter enrollment statistics by WNYC's Brigid Bergin. The Board of Elections then confirmed that more than 120,000 voters have been dropped from the rolls in Brooklyn alone since November.

The Trump campaign will open a Washington, D.C., office next week, part of a larger move the campaign is making toward becoming a more traditional political operation.

The plans were first announced last week, but the office opening will come following Donald Trump's bruising, 13-point loss to Ted Cruz in Wisconsin on Tuesday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell vowed again Wednesday to block President Obama's Supreme Court nomination, saying the American people should have a "voice" in the process.

Hillary Clinton had a big night Tuesday, cheered by an exultant crowd in Palm Beach, Fla., as she won four states and led in a fifth. But some people on social media criticized Clinton's tone during her speech.

It started with several tweets from male television personalities.

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough told her: "Smile. You just had a big night."

Just before that, he had tweeted: "What a massive night for @HillaryClinton."

Donald Trump's campaign has spent an unusual amount of time this week answering questions about violent incidents.

The latest involves an allegation by reporter Michelle Fields of conservative site Breitbart that she was assaulted by someone who was ID'd by another reporter as Trump's campaign manager.

Here's what we know:

What Fields reported

President Obama said Thursday that the Republican Party is responsible for Donald Trump's rise, for "over a course of time, creating an environment where somebody like Donald Trump can thrive." Obama refuted the argument that Trump's surge is a reaction to his presidency.

"He's just doing more of what has been done for the last 7 1/2 years. And, in fact, in terms of his positions on a whole range of issues, they're not very different from any of the other candidates," Obama said in response to a question during a news conference with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Bernie Sanders was the story of Tuesday night as he beat Hillary Clinton in Michigan's Democratic presidential primary. It wasn't a walloping — he won by less than 2 points — but still a big coup considering Clinton led in most polls by double digits before the race.

Michigan is Sanders' ninth state win, though Clinton still leads in delegates overall.

That means Sanders is only partway up a steep hill to the nomination.

Businesswoman Carly Fiorina, who ended her own presidential bid last month, has endorsed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.

Appearing at a Cruz rally in Miami on Wednesday morning, Fiorina said she voted for Cruz in Virginia's recent primary, and praised his record in challenging Washington's status quo.

Calling Cruz a "real constitutional conservative," she said "he is a fearless fighter and reformer, and he didn't care much whether he got invited to the cocktail parties in Washington, D.C." Fiorina said.

Former three-term mayor of New York City Michael Bloomberg said Monday he will not run for president, after months of speculation that he would jump in as in independent during a campaign in which it seems anything could happen.

Abraham Lincoln trended on Twitter this week. Wait, what? Honest Abe proved what's become a hipster creed: Everything old becomes new again.

Friday would have been the 16th president's 207th birthday — as good a time as any to bring him back with a party hat on him (like the House Republicans did):

There were also memes of Lincoln holding pizzas, stereos and cellphones. But the memes also quickly became about the presidential candidates, with the hashtag #ThingsLincolnDidntSay. Talk about putting words in someone's mouth.

We all know live election coverage is hard — you have to cram a lot of quickly changing information into not a lot of time, and sometimes you forget to eat dinner. MSNBC's Chris Hayes must have been hungry, because here's what he said after Bernie Sanders was announced a winner:

This week, NPR asked voters around the country how they are feeling about this election, and why so many tell us they are anxious or angry.

President Obama and Vice President Biden "have tried to be fair and even-handed" in the primary process, Sen. Bernie Sanders said Wednesday following a meeting with the president at the White House.

Calling the meeting "constructive and productive," Sanders cautiously praised the Obama administration's economic work, saying there is still work to be done. The two also talked talked about foreign and domestic policy and "a little bit of politics," according to Sanders, who spoke to reporters after the meeting.

Several GOP presidential candidates are starting to lay out their closing messages in a new round of campaign ads airing in Iowa and New Hampshire this week. The ads come ahead of the early February primaries in those states.

They strike a dark and fearful tone, with footage and news headlines highlighting the recent terror attacks in San Bernardino, Calif., and Paris.

It all started with a question about food labeling at the Iowa Agriculture Summit earlier this year and Jeb Bush's not-so-humble brag:

"When I go to Publix in Coral Gables after church to go prepare for Sunday Funday in my house ... I'll probably make a really good guacamole and I want to know where that avocado is from and I want to know where the onions are from and the cilantro and all the secret stuff I put in it."

Stressing that his administration has "been at this for a long time," President Obama launched a forceful defense of his strategy against ISIS in a year-end interview with NPR. He makes "no apologies," he said, for wanting to target terror groups "appropriately and in a way that is consistent with American values."

Weighing in at 17 1/2 pounds, 4-month-old giant panda cub Bei Bei made his media debut Wednesday at the Smithsonian National Zoo. Keepers say the cub, born in August, is developmentally on track and ahead of his older sister Bao Bao in some milestones. The cub will make his public debut on Jan. 16.

"He's actually walking a lot sooner than his older sister did," said panda keeper Juan Rodriguez. "He's about 4 or so pounds heavier than his sister was at this same age, so he's definitely a much larger bear and developing a lot faster than his sister did."

This post was updated at 10:00 a.m. ET Friday.

Fourteen Republican candidates are speaking Thursday at a forum hosted by the Republican Jewish Coalition in Washington, D.C. Comments made by front-runner Donald Trump are already garnering criticism on social media.

Trump spoke about Wednesday's shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., saying it "probably was related" to "radical Islamic terrorism." He criticized Obama for not using the term.

It starts with seemingly benign questions: Who are you voting for? Did you see that exposé about candidate X on Facebook? Before long, somebody is storming off to the basement or slamming the mashed potatoes on the table. And playing Adele's new song "Hello" won't make every family instantly get along (a la SNL's Thanksgiving Miracle).

Bernie Sanders laid out his brand of Democratic socialism Thursday, explaining how it informs his views on higher education, poverty, health care, the minimum wage and more.

In response to last week's terrorist attacks in Paris, House Republicans have formed a task force charged with finding a legislative response to calm fears about Syrian refugees coming into the U.S.

Speaking on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, House Speaker Paul Ryan called the attacks "pure evil."

"It's clear that this was an act of war and that the world needs American leadership," he said.

'It's All Politics' is packing up. We have decided to suspend the blog to consolidate NPR's political news and make it easier to find.

But don't worry, we're bringing you with us. You can find the same great news coverage, analysis, fact checking and more from NPR's political team streamlined here: NPR Politics.

We're also adding some new beats and angles to our coverage — more on that to come.

The Republican National Committee says it will suspend a debate partnership with NBC News, citing "inaccurate or downright offensive" questions during Wednesday night's debate on CNBC.

"We simply cannot continue with NBC without full consultation with our campaigns," RNC Chairman Reince Priebus wrote in a letter to NBC Chairman Andrew Lack.

This post was updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Paul Ryan has been elected speaker of the House of Representatives, receiving 236 votes.

Ryan faced the full House vote Thursday after getting approval Wednesday from the House Republican conference. He faced token opposition from fellow conservative Daniel Webster and Democrat Nancy Pelosi.

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