The Weekly Reader | WYPR

The Weekly Reader

Wednesdays at 2:33 p.m.

"What should I read next?"

The Weekly Reader answers this question by featuring the crème de la crème of recent releases in four action-packed, opinionated, book-loving minutes. It’s like having a new best friend with very good taste to guide you in your literary adventures. 

The Weekly Reader theme song is produced by Vince Winik.

Farrar Strauss Giroux (l); Simon and Schuster

Algonquin (l); Doubleday (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, fact and fiction about life in Northern Ireland during The Troubles.

Knopf

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two short books by a favorite author, Jenny Offill. Marion Winik shares her thoughts on The Department of Speculation and Weather. 

Ecco (l); Algonquin (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, two very different takes on growing up in America: Natasha Trethewey's memoir Memorial Drive and Gabriel Bump's novel Everywhere You Don't Belong.

Turtle Point (l); Yale University Press (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new books that search for meaning by reflecting on the past: Cold Moon: On Love, Life and Responsibility, by Roger Rosenblatt, and A World Out of Reach: Dispatches from Life Under Lockdown, edited by Meghan O'Rourke.

Celadon (l); Counterpoint (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new memoirs that showcase the special bond between dogs and their human companions: Good Boy: A Life in Seven Dogs by Jennifer Finney Boylan, and The Wrong Dog Dream by Jane Vandenburgh.


Putnam (l); Riverhead (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, may we suggest an audio book or two? Our book critic Marion Winik makes the case for listening to Sarah Blake's The Postmistress and James McBride's Deacon King Kong.

Ecco (l); Algonquin (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels that bring New York City to life: Debra Jo Immergut's You Again, and Caroline Leavitt's With or Without You.

Riverhead (l); Ecco (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels that manage to capture the current cultural zeitgeist: Memorial by Bryan Washington, and Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam.

One World (l); Ohio State University Press (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new books that provide windows into the real lives of two very different women: Golem Girl by Riva Lehrer and Like Love by Michele Morano.

Simon and Schuster (l); Little Brown (r)

American identity is often complex, and sometimes, hyphenated. On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review Chinese-American author Susie Yang's White Ivy and Pakistani-American playwright Ayad Akhtar's Homeland Elegies.

Random House

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews three books by one of her favorite authors, Curtis Sittenfeld: Rodham, Eligible, and American Wife

Harper (l); Harper (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two novels about the characters and secrets of small towns with big stories: The Cold Millions by Jess Walter, and The Lost Shtetl by Max Gross.

Random House (l); Grove (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we travel from Southern California to the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and small town Texas with two new collections featuring inter-related stories: Emma Cline's Daddy, and Kelli Jo Ford's Crooked Hallelujah.

Little Brown (l); Grove (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new books that seek to illuminate the uncommon lives of American women who are often overshadowed by their male counterparts: Seyward Darby's Sisters in Hate, and Laila Lalami's Conditional Citizens.

Riverhead (l); Knopf (r)

As much as we’d like to believe otherwise, death is an inescapable part of life. On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new novels that explore the topic with grace, wit and intelligence: Sigrid Nunez's What Are You Going Through and Yaa Gyasi's Transcendent Kingdom.

Harper (l); Algonquin (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new novels about navigating the sometimes complicated waters of modern marriage, both at home and abroad: Sue Miller's Monogamy, and Peace Adzo Medie's His Only Wife

Farrar Strauss Giroux (l); W. Virginia University (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, debuts from two authors you will want to get to know: Marion Winik reviews Raven Leilani 's Luster, and Deesha Philyaw's The Secret Lives of Church Ladies.

Custom House (l); Random House (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new novels from different corners of the world that illustrate our common humanity: The Exiles, by Christine Baker Kline, and Apeirogon, by Colum McCann.

Algonquin (l) Simon & Schuster (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we go behind the scenes with ghost writers and gatecrashers to see how the other half lives. Marion Winik reviews Heidi Pitlor's Impersonation and Ben Widdicombe's Gatecrasher.

Riverhead (l); Knopf (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we encourage you to take a break from your everyday worries and get lost in a great book! Marion Winik reviews Edmund White's A Saint from Texas, and Maggie O'Farrell's Hamnet.

Riverhead (l); Workman (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels about the complex, full, and fascinating world of mature women's lives: Charlotte Wood's The Weekend and Larry Watson's The Lives of Edie Pritchard.

Graywolf (l); One World (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new memoirs that examine the effects and aftermath of civil war and civil unrest: Wayetu Moore's The Giant, The Dragons, The Women, and Wes Moore's Five Days.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (l); Penguin (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new memoirs that are very "of the moment": Paul Takes the Form of a Mortal Girl and Becoming Duchess Goldblatt

Random House (l); Avid Reader (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels that feature unexpected pregnancies and their unintended consequences: Connie Schultz's The Daughters of Erietown and Emily Gould's Perfect Tunes.

Doubleday (l); Little Brown (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, our book critic Marion Winik reviews two new novels perfect for summertime reading: Kevin Kwan's Sex and Vanity and Elin Hilderbrand's 28 Summers.

Pages