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WYPR Features

Celadon (l); Counterpoint (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new memoirs that showcase the special bond between dogs and their human companions: Good Boy: A Life in Seven Dogs by Jennifer Finney Boylan, and The Wrong Dog Dream by Jane Vandenburgh.


Dejan Krsmanovic via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

In my bachelor days, I would occasionally come upon a carton of milk in the refrigerator that was just about to reach its expiration date. I’d give it the old smell test, and if it passed, even if barely, then I could have a bowl of cereal.


To a degree, what the Maryland men’s basketball team is about to do with a young man named James Graham III is roughly the same. It passes the smell test, but just by the proverbial whiff.

Second Wave of COVID-19 & Mental Health

Dec 7, 2020

This is Al Waller, your host for ClearPath Radio – Your Roadmap to Health and Wealth. Experts indicate we are experiencing a second wave of COVID-19, and it could lead to a new wave of mental health issues. Joining me is Mihaela Vincze, public health expert for nonprofit Transamerica Institute, here to discuss how to prepare for this difficult time.

The Reports: Week of December 7th 2020

Dyer's Deceit

Dec 4, 2020

Gil on the (Minor League) Orioles' play-by-play announcer Bill Dyer and his so-called "lucky chair."

Last Friday, on Black Friday, instead of hitting the malls or shopping online, I escaped to go paddling in my kayak. I explored the streams, rivers, and wetlands at Point Lookout State Park, in far southern Maryland.

The thousand-acre park is at the tip of a narrow peninsula sticking far out into the Chesapeake Bay, at its confluence with the Potomac River.

About a quarter mile out into the river, a forest of wooden poles rose up with fishing nets suspended between them. Brown pelicans, double-crested cormorants and seagulls perched on the ends of the poles, looking down on the pound nets – fishers, keeping a hungry eye on the work of fishermen.

After a few hours of fishing with my feathered colleagues, I put down my rod and dragged my boat up onto the shore. I was on a crescent of sand, with no footprints – only oyster shells, driftwood, and gently lapping waves. It was a stunningly beautiful landscape. And because of its beauty, it was hard to imagine the dark and bloody history that unfolded here

Vermentino

Dec 2, 2020

We agree, Vermentino is one of Italy's best whites, and very easy to like.

Too Many Tantrums

Dec 2, 2020

Tantrums are a normal part of a toddler's development. But you can help your child learn skills now that will help them cope well with all the disappointment and frustration that will come thier way. 

A Passion For Giving Leads To A Joyful Reunion

Dec 2, 2020
Provided by Kennedy Krieger Institute

A mutual passion for Kennedy Krieger reunited two families after 40 years. Orlee Engler Kahn, director of planned giving at Kennedy Krieger, had a front row seat to their joyful reunion. Listen to their story.

Putnam (l); Riverhead (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, may we suggest an audio book or two? Our book critic Marion Winik makes the case for listening to Sarah Blake's The Postmistress and James McBride's Deacon King Kong.

Mish Mish via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The next few weeks are going to be filled with celebratory dinners, scaled back, of course, because of COVID. Even if it's just the two of you, or maybe one more trusted couple, there's no reason you can't pull out all the stops and serve up one of the most majestic meals of the season. And Chef Jerry Pellegrino, it's hard to top a standing rib roast for dining majesty.

The Reports: Week of November 30th 2020

Austin Kirk via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

What a mess!

No, not the Afghan puppy that’s the subject of a series of children’s books, but rather the situation the Ravens and the NFL find themselves in thanks to COVID-19.

Actually, terms like quagmire, morass or just plain catastrophe might be more appropriate than merely a mess.

Increasing Productivity During COVID-19

Nov 30, 2020

This is Al Waller, your host for ClearPath Radio – Your Roadmap to Health and Wealth. Many people have been feeling less productive than usual during the pandemic. Joining me is Mihaela Vincze, public health expert for nonprofit Transamerica Institute, here to discuss ways to decrease stress and increase productivity.

Mileah Kromer

Nov 27, 2020

  

  Tom talks with Mileah Kromer, the Director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center at Goucher College.  Mileah is reading:

 

Steadfast Democrats:  How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior by Ismail K. White and Chryl N. Laird

https://www.theivybookshop.com/book/9780691199511

 

And

 

My Life as a Villainess by Laura Lippman

December 6, 1943--The audience at The Hippodrome waited to see the Benny Goodman band with drummer Gene Krupa take the stage. But it wasn't Krupa behind the kit. Gil tells us how a Baltimore boy stood in for the famous drummer, without anyone knowing. 

Viognier

Nov 25, 2020

We hadn't thought of it before but viognier definitely belongs on the Thanksgiving table, with its rich flavors, good acidity, and versatility.

Jason Jacobs via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Every couple years or so I have been making it a habit to pick up a few different varieties of apples and do a scientific test to see which make the best pie. The method is to make four identical small pies, each with just one variety, and then taste test them to see which is the winner. And since Chef Jerry Pellegrino owns an apple farm, I am certain he has some strong opinions on this subject.

Music Soothes the Infant Soul

Nov 25, 2020

Where does our love of music begin? Experts believe it is in the first five years. (Photo by iStock/RyanJLane) 

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving, but because of the coronavirus, many people – for the first time in their lives -- won’t be able to gather with their families and friends.

As an alternative to a big indoor get-together, consider a socially-distanced hike in the woods with your family in one of Maryland’s 53 state parks.

One great way to find the nearest one to you is by downloading the free Maryland Department of Natural Resource “ACCESS DNR” app from the Apple iPhone app store. It provides great maps, directions, public boat launch locations, fishing and hunting licenses – everything.

I used the app for directions to Cunningham Falls State Park, about an hour and a quarter northwest of Baltimore, where I went hiking recently.   

Ecco (l); Algonquin (r)

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels that bring New York City to life: Debra Jo Immergut's You Again, and Caroline Leavitt's With or Without You.

We’re back with another edition of ClearPath – Your Roadmap to Health & Wealth.  I’m your host, Al Waller. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote in the United States. Since then, women have made great strides in educational achievement and career opportunities. Despite this progress, they continue to be at greater risk than men of not achieving a financially secure retirement due to obstacles such as lower pay and time out of the workforce for parenting or caregiving. Catherine Collinson, president of nonprofit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies is joining us to share her insights.

  

The Reports: Week of November 23rd 2020

Hillel Steinberg via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

If your household was like mine around this time of the year, the life of the turkey we dined on on Thanksgiving Day extended long past the meal of the fourth Thursday in November.

The leftover white and dark meat became turkey sandwiches with gravy or turkey salad, while the bones, added to some broth and vegetables, yielded turkey soup. And, for my money, leftover sweet potato custard was better the day after on its own or, better yet, in a pie crust.

All of this comes to mind as you ponder how those who run college football are doing their damndest to extend the life of the current season beyond what should be a proper resolution.

Gil tells us how the seasoning staple began.

"Free To Vote": Lessons From Election 2020

Nov 18, 2020
Phil Roeder via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

It’s been two weeks since Election Day, when a record breaking number of people voted in the midst of a pandemic. On today’s Future City we assess the national and local races and ask what lessons they can teach us about elections and ballot access moving forward.

We discuss how election officials pivoted to create safer voting opportunities, the fight to make voting more accessible for currently and formerly incarcerated people, and the impact of both polling and grassroots organizing on electoral politics. 

Just before the presidential election, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation sent me a letter asking me for money.

Many of you probably received the same fund-raising letter from the nonprofit group, urging financial support for their oyster planting campaign.

The letter said,  “You can help bring back the oysters and save the Bay!  Your gift to CBF of just $18 will help us plant 1,800 oysters… Larger gifts will help us do even more!”

  
Along with the letter came a bright yellow slip of paper with what it called an important update. The note assured voters: “Our work has always been bipartisan, because we know that the health of the Bay – and the people and wildlife that live in the watershed -- is not political.”

This final bit – about saving the Bay being non-political – is not really true, although it is probably effective as fundraising language among CBF’s wealthy donors who enjoy oysters. The fact is, environmental laws and policies are inherently political. This is because they usually require votes by elected officials who are members of political parties and must make decisions that are almost always controversial because they involve some kind of economic compromise for the common good.  

Pipers Brook Vineyard via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

With Thanksgiving just a week away, we recommend putting Pinot Noir on the table. Here are three choices that are quite affordable.

We’re back with another edition of ClearPath – Your Roadmap to Health & Wealth.  I’m your host, Al Waller. 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of women’s right to vote in the United States. Since then, women have made great strides in educational achievement and career opportunities. Despite this progress, they continue to be at greater risk than men of not achieving a financially secure retirement due to obstacles such as lower pay and time out of the workforce for parenting or caregiving. Catherine Collinson, president of nonprofit Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies is joining us to share her insights.

  

Sometime it Hurts to Be a Baby

Nov 18, 2020

For an infant, going to the doctor can be a pain but it doesn't have to hurt. (Photo by iStock/lisegagne)

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