Preakness | WYPR

Preakness

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Bernard C. “Jack” Young kicked off his first week as acting Baltimore mayor by lobbying the Maryland General Assembly to kill a bill that could direct state funding to Laurel Park.  

 

Young, the city council president who became ex officio mayor when Mayor Catherine Pugh took a leave of absence for health reasons, visited with the Baltimore City delegation Thursday morning and fired off letters to Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, seeking their help.

It’s a safe bet that the conflict of interest controversy over the University of Maryland Medical System doing business with members of its board of directors will suck up much of the energy in Annapolis as the General Assembly begins its two week sprint to  adjournment at midnight April 8.

A House of Delegates committee heard testimony Friday on an emergency bill introduced by Speaker Mike Busch aimed at keeping board members from doing business with the medical system. And a Senate committee heard testimony on a similar bill from Baltimore Democrat Jill Carter two weeks ago. Both bills appear to have solid bi-partisan support.

AP Photo/Nick Wass

It was probably difficult to see on television Saturday, what with all that fog and mist that enveloped Pimlico, but a few seconds after Justify won the Preakness, another horse crossed the finish line.

This horse, however, is far older than the field of three year-olds in the race, but know this: If Justify has this horse’s stamina, he’ll win the Belmont and thus the Triple Crown going away in less than three weeks.

In a nod to the group, America, this horse has no name, per se, but rather a theme, namely that Pimlico Race Course is in trouble.

Pugh Touts Park Heights Plan

May 17, 2018
Dominique Maria Bonessi

Mayor Catherine Pugh offered an update Thursday on her estimated $110 million plan to redevelop the blighted Park Heights neighborhood, which abuts Pimlico Race Course. She made the announcement just days before the Preakness is to be run at the aging track.

Pugh’s plan calls for acquiring and demolishing vacant buildings, putting up new, affordable housing and building a new school. She says its part of the effort to keep the Preakness, the second jewel in racing’s triple crown, in the city.

Karen Hosler

There was no shortage of enthusiasm from the hardy band of mostly local folk of a certain age in the Pimlico clubhouse last Saturday. They spent Kentucky Derby day watching horse races from around the country on video display terminals and eagerly placing their bets.

But they also had to be wondering what will become of this decrepit old track that has been reduced to a 12-day live racing season that includes the Preakness, the second jewel in the Triple Crown.

Joel McCord and Karen Hosler, of the WYPR News team, talk about the $300 million price tag for restoring Pimlico Race Course and preserving The Preakness.

Oh sure, the second day of Pimlico’s 2016 season was rain-soaked and gloomy. It was so bad the small scrum of spectators for the opening race didn’t even bother to leave the comfort of the freshly scrubbed clubhouse, watching the action on relatively new flat screen TVs instead.