Podcast Central | WYPR

Podcast Central

The $10 Billion Savior, Episode 1

Jan 15, 2019

After receiving a titillating tip, Producer Richard Yeagley embeds himself into the professional life of Kahan Dhillon, an unknown real estate developer who is proposing a $10 billion citywide redevelopment plan for Baltimore.

Season 1, Episode 1

Pine Ridge Reservation, part 1: Meeting a Prayer Halfway

Jan 14, 2019
all photos by Wendel Patrick

We team up with Arlo Iron Cloud of KILI Radio, Voice of the Lakota Nation, for this listening tour of The Pine Ridge Reservation, a 50 by 100 mile stretch of land in South Dakota that's home to the Oglala Lakota people. In this episode, we meet a radio producer, a hip hop artist, a medicine man, a home builder, a tribal government leader, a powwow organizer, a painter, and a philosopher who’s chosen to live alone in a house with no electricity and no running water.

Heidi Sheppard

Sixty years ago - on the night of October 26 1958, around midnight, two men were driving by Loch Raven Reservoir in Towson. Suddenly, they saw a huge egg-shaped object appear above a bridge. As they got closer, their car stopped dead.

They watched the object hover for a while and then there was a flash of light – some strange noise – and a burst of heat – it then rose into the sky and disappeared. The event remains unexplained.

Today, this history has been rediscovered and embraced by residents of the Knollwood neighborhood of Towson, Maryland, who are hoping to launch an Alien Invasion festival in the future. What's behind the continued allure of space?

Joy in Medicine - Palliative Care

Jan 4, 2019

Elizabeth and Charlie talk with physicians about serving patients through palliative care. 

Essential Tremors - Wume

Jan 3, 2019

Baltimore duo Wume draws on the motorik pulse and cosmic synths of vintage Krautrock, but update them with mesmerizing patterns of complex rhythm and a wide-eyed sense of exploration. In this episode, Al Schatz and April Camlin discuss three tunes that pointed the way to their sound.

In its prime, Pennsylvania Avenue was the black entertainment hub of Baltimore, but there’s a whole generation that doesn’t know about that heyday. The Jubilee Arts program aims to bridge the gap. We meet Jade Davis of Jubilee Arts, who teaches a children’s ballet class on the corner of Pennsylvania Ave and Presstman Street, and we get a historical perspective from community organizers Todd Marcus and Amelia Harris of Intersection of Change. We also get two takes on opiate addiction, one from a pharmacy that has to watch out for counterfeit prescriptions, and one from a former drug counselor who’s currently battling his own addiction.

Pennsylvania Avenue, part 2: Born in a Tornado

Dec 18, 2018
all photos by Wendel Patrick

In this episode, businesses survive against the economic odds on the 1800 block of Pennsylvania Avenue, where local entrepreneurs have established their niches with fashion boutiques, discount variety stores, jewelry shops, hair salons, and carry-out restaurants. These are the places where money changes hands and meaningful relationships are nurtured every day. In the words of Sache Jones of No Boundaries Coalition: We do not give up on each other in this neighborhood, even if it feels like outsiders have given up on us

Bringing the world together for a cure

Dec 6, 2018
Kennedy Krieger

At this holiday season, we are inspired by two families who have joined together, from different corners of the globe, to combat the rare disease afflicting their children. Leslie Marsiglia from Kennedy Krieger’s philanthropy group shares how the McGinns from the D.C. area, and the Fergusons from New Zealand, have partnered to raise money to help Kennedy Krieger Institute find a cure for LBSL, the potentially fatal genetic disorder that both Ellie and Marco are battling.

Dubscience Photography

Baltimore's nonprofit arts and culture sector is a $606 million industry supporting more than 15,000 full-time jobs and generating $54.5 million in local and state revenue.

But just how accessible are these artistic jobs? Who is benefiting from our thriving cultural sector – are the arts equitable? These are some of the questions we’ll be discussing today.

We’ll also be discussing how the arts – especially poetry – can be a tool for activism. We’ll be speaking with a number of local poets and performers who are using their art specifically for the purposes of social engagement and activism.

The Serial Killer Who Wasn't ... and Then Was Pt.1 of 2

Dec 5, 2018

The first in a two part series, we examine the controversy surrounding the fear that a serial killer was preying upon women in Northwest Baltimore.

Pennsylvania Avenue, part 1: Resurrection Intersection

Dec 4, 2018
all photos by Wendel Patrick

In 2015, circling helicopter footage showed West Baltimore in chaos. In the wake of the death of Freddie Gray, buildings burned, protesters and looters alike filled the streets, and entire neighborhoods were cordoned off by armored police and the National Guard. Today, the riot police are gone, and so is the media frenzy, but the neighborhood remains, scarred by the story of what happened.  Local activist Ray Kelly says, “To be frank, the unrest started long before the riots, and the unrest is still happening today.” In this episode, we meet Mr. Kelly, along with his neighbors on a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue where the community is determined to redefine itself in the aftermath of a narrative shaped by outsiders.

A Valuable Perspective - Betsy Hughes

Nov 30, 2018

Roland Park Place resident Betsy Hughes talks about her past experiences and current role with The Vane Brothers Company.

Essential Tremors - Steve Reich

Nov 29, 2018

Steve Reich long ago transcended the "minimalist" tag to stand as one of America's greatest and most influential living composers. In this episode, he details the effects that the music of Stravinsky, Perotin, and John Coltrane had on some of his seminal pieces.

Essential Tremors - Mimi Parker (Low)

Nov 16, 2018
Shelly Mosman

For 25 years, Mimi Parker’s minimalist drumming and angelic voice have helped provide the spine, and the soul, of Low, the brooding trio from Duluth, Minn. Just before the release of their mold-breaking new album, Double Negative, Parker discussed her tough upbringing, discovering music beyond classic rock, and the indie band that launched a thousand other indie bands.

Faith

Nov 5, 2018

A street preacher pleads with passersby to heed the word of God, a Pentecostal pastor struggles with her calling, a Muslim father and son confront anti-Islamic sentiment, a man behind bars reinvents himself through Islam, an Orthodox Jew flees religious oppression in Iran, a Mennonite couple opens an urban school, and a Native American man decolonizes his spiritual self.  

Joy in Medicine - Joy in the Operating Room?

Nov 1, 2018
Flickr/Creative Commons

Elizabeth and Charlie talk with doctors and nurses about teaching and finding "joy" in the OR.

Flickr / Avia Venefica

From Ancient Celtic harvest rites warding off ghosts and spirits... to Roman rites honoring the dead... To All Saint's Day masses... On this episode, Katie is exploring the origins and evolution of modern Halloween celebrations. We also feature a reading of T.S. Eliot's haunting poem, "The Hollow Men." Happy Halloween! 

Through the Lens: "Holy Crap, They Arrested My Editor"

Oct 30, 2018

As we continue to explore how the media narrative informed policing in Baltimore in the past, we tell the story of the arrest of Baltimore Examiner editor Frank Keegan in 2007.

Elizabeth Harper

Elizabeth Harper is an author, photographer, and academic, as well as the creator of the popular online blog: All the Saints You Should Know: Bones, Relics, Lore, and Oddities from the Catholic Church. On this episode, Katie and Elizabeth talk about the confusion over incorruptibility of saints' bodies, the strange allure of ossuaries (bone churches), folk Catholicism and veneration, and how churches can act as memory theaters for forgotten history.

Stories about hope, sacrifice, home, and what happens when you come to America, as told by immigrants from Egypt, Nepal, Korea, Eritrea, Vietnam, El Salvador, Afghanistan, China, and Jordan.

On this episode, Katie takes listeners on an audio tour of the First Annual International Edgar Allan Poe Festival and then meets up with Stephen Demczuk, founder and CEO, of Raven Brewing Company, to learn about the origins of this iconic Poe-inspired beer.

Through The Lens: An Early Video of Police Brings Harsh Consequences

Oct 10, 2018

The 2006 video of police striking Glenn Curry while he was handcuffed was one of the first examples of how capturing arrests on camera would eventually change the conversation about law enforcement in Baltimore.  However for the man that made the tape there were steep consequences, fallout that continues to have repercussions today.

Fast Friends

Oct 8, 2018

Two childhood friends go in on a shared dream and open up a beauty salon. At a tire shop, a tall guy and a short guy know how to make each other laugh. A crew of octogenarian pigeon racers trade tall tales. Two cousins move in and learn how to be roommates. An isolated shopkeeper finds trust and compassion in one of his regular customers. Two immigrants manage the multicultural staff at American Wings & Pizza. An unlikely friendship blossoms between a pair of residents at a halfway house. And two exes-turned-business-partners manage to stay friends through it all. 

Stories about surprising second acts, from the owner of a pinball museum, a Kashmiri journalist exiled to a snack counter, a washer repairman with a checkered past, a funeral director who stumbled into the job after he married into the business, a former gang member who now runs a religious radio station, a guy who turned his rock n roll music studio into a corporate voiceover business, a woman who left an abusive man and found herself in the process, and a handyman who moonlights as a standup comic.

Essential Tremors - Colin Newman (Wire)

Sep 24, 2018

Colin Newman rewrote the rules of punk with London-based band Wire, and went on to push back the boundaries on creativity and relevance for decades-long rock careers. But Newman has also thrived as a solo artist and producer — and the latter role is what he wanted to talk about in this episode, with three tracks that have shaped his work in the studio.

Hidden Victims: A Women's Death Ignored

Sep 13, 2018

In this installment of our Hidden Victims series, we examine an aspect of the criminal justice system that is often overlooked: how police treat suspicious deaths involving women of color.

To understand how some cases remain stuck in a nebulous category called "undetemined," we speak to the family of Tyra McClarly  McClary was found buried under a pile of mulch with her ankles wrapped in a plastic bag in 2006, but her case remains in investigative limbo.

Two-time National Book Award Finalist Howard Norman writes strange and melancholy novels, most of which are set in remote Canadian provinces. His books deal with murder, love, detectives, and the impossibility of closure. Howard Norman is a creative writing professor at University of Maryland and spends his summers at a farmhouse in Vermont. On this episode, Katie and Howard discuss deep melancholy, existential noir, and 'that other world' which calls to us.  

Strong Women

Sep 10, 2018

Stories from a mixed-martial-arts fighter, the manager of a diner, a trainer of Doberman Pinschers, a child-abuse survivor, a fashion entrepreneur, a recovering drug addict, a performance artist, a mom who avoided suicide, and the woman who convinced Baltimore to build a skate park.

Essential Tremors - Chad Clark (Beauty Pill)

Sep 5, 2018

Though he emerged from Washington, D.C.’s post punk scene with the band Smart Went Crazy, Chad Clark has expanded his musical palette with Beauty Pill, an omnivorous band that makes the most of his vivid melodies and wry lyrics. In this episode, he discusses Paul Simon, a jazz tragedy, and "The Story of O.J."

bibliomania: noun: passionate enthusiasm for collecting and posessing books.

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