Healthy Holly scandal | WYPR

Healthy Holly scandal

Governor Larry Hogan named 11 new members Wednesday to the scandal plagued board of directors of the University of Maryland Medical System.

The announcement came the same day as the UMMS Board elected a new chair and vice chair and released a consultant’s report that found hospital management made business deals with individual board members without informing the rest of the board or an appropriate board committee.

Patrick Semansky/AP

Weeks after she was accused of self-dealing, a month after she took a paid leave of absence for her health and just days after FBI and IRS raids, Catherine Pugh has resigned as mayor of Baltimore.

Speaking at a press conference in his downtown Baltimore office, her lawyer Steven Silverman read statement from Pugh. The 96-second long resignation letter read in part:

“I'm sorry for the harm that I have caused to the image of the city of Baltimore and the credibility of the office of the mayor. Baltimore deserves a mayor who can move our great city forward."

Emily Sullivan/WYPR

 

Last night, the city council introduced a package of charter amendments that would bolster its power throughout the city -- and over the mayor. WYPR’s Emily Sullivan joins Nathan Sterner to explain the proposed changes and their timeline.

 

Patrick Semansky/AP

A package of charter amendments being introduced at Monday’s Baltimore City Council meeting would give its members the ability to oust a mayor and override a mayoral veto with fewer votes than are now required.

The three proposed amendments arrive amid Mayor Catherine Pugh’s ongoing “Healthy Holly” scandal, in which Pugh sold a series of self-published children’s books to the University of Maryland Medical system while she sat on its board and also took money for the books from organizations that were seeking city contracts.

Jose Luis Magana/AP

Baltimore saw another chapter of the ongoing Healthy Holly scandal unfold Thursday: FBI and IRS agents raided seven properties associated with Mayor Catherine Pugh.

Photos of agents wearing FBI windbreakers and carrying boxes marked “Healthy Holly” swept through group chats, trending topics on social media, and the media -- local and national outlets alike.

Jose Luis Magana/AP

FBI and IRS agents raided city hall and the homes of Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh Thursday morning.

They also took documents from the office of the first term Democrat’s personal attorney, Steven Silverman. In a statement, Silverman said he received a limited subpoena for Pugh’s original financial records.

All 14 of the district-representing City Council members have asked Mayor Catherine Pugh to resign from her office immediately.

Their two-sentence letter, released Monday morning, was blunt.

“The entire membership of the Baltimore City Council believes that it is not in the best interest of the City of Baltimore, for you to continue to serve as Mayor,” it read. “We urge you to tender your resignation, effective immediately.”

Pugh’s office responded with a blunt statement of its own.

Patrick Semansky/AP

After urging from Governor Larry Hogan and a slew of Baltimore elected officials, Maryland’s Office of the State Prosecutor has opened an investigation into Mayor Catherine Pugh’s "Healthy Holly" book sales.

The governor formally asked for the investigation on Monday, calling the sales "deeply disturbing allegations" in a letter to state prosecutor Emmet Davitt. On Tuesday, Pugh's lawyer confirmed to the Baltimore Sun that the office has opened an investigation.

Emily Sullivan/WYPR

Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young became acting mayor on Tuesday, after Mayor Catherine E. Pugh stepped down from her role to take an indefinite leave of absence post Healthy Holly scandal fallout.

Pugh's office announced in a statement Monday that she would be taking the leave starting Tuesday, citing the first-term Democrat’s recent pneumonia and making no mention of the scandal.