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Baltimore's transit inequities are taking a toll on public health

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BaltimoreLink was launched in 2017 by the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) to create a more efficient and reliable bus network by spreading out the routes within the downtown core and creating a grid of high-frequency routes. (photo by Michael Wilson, via Flickr)

Now, it’s Midday on Transportation

Dr. Lawrence Brown of Morgan State University coined the phrase “The Black Butterfly and the White L” to describe the boundaries between Black and White neighborhoods in Baltimore, and the socio-economic disparities between them. A new report on transit equity shows environmental and public health impacts within those boundaries as well.

In short, a poorly designed and poorly functioning mass transit system creates problems that include, but also transcend, people having trouble getting to and from work and school. Today, we consider what those problems are, and how best to address them.

Tom's next guests are co-authors of the study that examines transit equity and its correlation to public health in Baltimore.

Dr. Megan Weil Latshaw is an associate scientist in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Samuel Jordan is the co-founder and president of the Baltimore Transit Equity Coalition.

They both join us on Zoom. We welcome questions and comments from our listeners.

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Dr. Megan Weil Latshaw is an associate scientist with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Samuel Jordan is founder and president of the Baltimore Transit Equity Coalition.

Host, Midday (M-F 12:00-1:00)
Malarie is Midday's Supervisory Producer.
Rob is Midday's senior producer.