Humanities Connection | WYPR

Humanities Connection

Thursday at 4:44 pm
  • Hosted by Hosted by: Maryland Humanities Executive Director Dr. Phoebe Stein

Humanities Connection explores the role of the humanities in our daily lives, and features lively reflections around topics like education, literature, health care, race, politics, religion, history, and more.

Joining Phoebe for each segment is a series of special guests, including Maryland Humanities partners, board members, and local humanists. The result is a mix of stories and conversation designed to shed light on the human experience and stimulate the intellectual curiosity of our listeners.

Archive Prior to 11/5/13

Theme music created by Brian Whaley at www.brianwhaleymusic.com

Visit Maryland Humanities to access additional resources, videos, and other dynamic content related to each segment.

Maryland Humanities is a statewide, educational nonprofit that creates and supports educational experiences in the humanities that inspire all Marylanders to embrace lifelong learning, exchange ideas openly, and enrich their communities.

What are the humanities? The humanities explore the human experience. Through the humanities, we think about who we are – our ideas, our histories, our literature, our values – and how we relate to one another. The humanities include literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages, theology, jurisprudence, ethics, art history, architecture, and some disciplines of the social sciences.

Autism Through a Literary Lens

May 17, 2019
Hannah Grieco

Autism Through a Literary Lens

May 16, 2019
Hannah Grieco

Voices of Baltimore Youth

May 10, 2019
Sarah Weissman

Did you know that since 2013, a student-produced literary magazine has featured feature the poetry, fiction, essays, and artwork of 450 students in Baltimore City Public Schools? CHARM: Voices of Baltimore Youth  Executive Director Whitney Birenbaum tells us more about the organization and literary magazine. After she speaks, ninth grader Marian Tibrey (pictured here) — a CHARM participant — shares her original poem.  

Water/Ways in Baltimore County

May 2, 2019
Historical Society of Baltimore County

Did you know more than 100,000 creeks, streams, and rivers flow toward the Chesapeake Bay across parts of six states? Historical Society of Baltimore County’s James G. Keffer talks about the history and stories of water in the county. The Historical Society is the first of six Maryland sites to host Water/Ways, a traveling Smithsonian Institution exhibition brought to smaller communities across the state by Maryland Humanities. Local Water/Ways host sites add their own local exhibits to complement the Smithsonian’s exhibition.

Weaving a New Narrative at Towson University and Beyond

Apr 25, 2019
Julie Potter

“What Were You Wearing? Weaving a New Narrative” is an installation revealing pervasive cultural attitudes about assault while working to change those attitudes. Molly Cohen, a theatre artist and graduate of the Department of Theatre Arts at Towson University, talks about the installation.  This project is funded by a grant from Maryland Humanities to Towson University. We would like to reiterate that the subject of the segment is a humanities project about sexual assault.

Faith Community Dialogues on Immigration on Race

Apr 18, 2019
University of Maryland, Baltimore County

How is one partnership encouraging open and honest dialogue about faith and race?  Drs. Felipe Filomeno & Tania Lizarazo – professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County – talk about “Honest Conversations: Faith Community Dialogues on Immigration and Race.” The partnership between UMBC and the Latino Racial Justice Circle is funded with a grant from Maryland Humanities.

Dalton Johnson, courtesy of Baltimore Chesapeake Bay Outward Bound.

How is Outward Bound using the humanities in its outdoor programming to enhance young people’s reflection, leadership skills, and more? Kelly Reynolds, Instructional Designer at Baltimore Chesapeake Bay Outward Bound, talks about the organization’s Character Curriculum.

Shared Place and Poetry in Salisbury

Mar 28, 2019

Salisbury Mayor Jacob Day will soon announce the city’s first-ever Poet Laureate to coincide with the annual Salisbury Poetry Week, April 1 -7. Tara A. Elliott, Salisbury Poetry Week’s founder, tells us more about this year’s week of programming. Elliott is also an English and Language Arts Teacher at Salisbury Middle School. She received the Christine D. Sarbanes Teacher of the Year Award, presented by Maryland Humanities, in 2018. Launched in 2017, Salisbury Poetry Week is supported in part by a Maryland Humanities grant.

Fashion as Historical Documentation

Mar 21, 2019

Did you know that an article of clothing can be interpreted as a historical document? What can we learn about figures from Maryland’s past by looking at what they wore? Allison Tolman, Chief Registrar and Associate Curator of the Fashion Archives at the Maryland Historical Society, tells us more.

Brown Girls Museum Blog

Mar 14, 2019

How are two women pushing past the gatekeeping that sometimes occurs within cultural institutions? Amanda Figueroa and Ravon Ruffin started Brown Girls Museum Blog, a platform that aims to promote the visibility of people of color, especially women, in the museum field and in academia.

The Multifaceted Legacy of Ida B. Wells

Mar 7, 2019
Harford Community College Office of Student Life

Did you know that journalist, suffragist and anti-lynching activist Ida B. Wells was also one of the founders of the NAACP? Harford Community College will host screenings of IDA B. WELLS: A PASSION FOR JUSTICE, which includes selections of Wells’ writing read by Toni Morrison.

The screenings complement figures of Wells and Mary Church, on loan from The National Great Blacks in Wax Museum in Baltimore. Sharoll Love, Student Diversity Specialist in Harford Community College Office of Student Life, tells us more.

The Why Black Lives Matter Curriculum

Feb 28, 2019

How can the humanities help teens process current-day issues and create a more equitable society? Staff at Wide Angle Youth Media have developed a curriculum called “Why Black Lives Matter: Discussing Race Through Film, Photography, and Design." The curriculum pairs youth media projects with instructional content. Dena Robinson –Wide Angle Youth Media’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Facilitator – tells us more. Maryland Humanities has provided support to this programming with a grant.

How can immigration experiences shape behavior, storytelling, and humanities scholarship? Dr. Mary Anne Akers, Board Member at Katipunan Filipino-American Association of Maryland, shares her perspective.  Maryland Humanities recently awarded the organization a grant for their project entitled “Locating Filipino Americans in Maryland: Our Immigrant Journeys.” Akers is Dean and Professor at Morgan State University’s School of Architecture and Planning.

The African-American History of the B&O Railroad

Feb 14, 2019
B&O Railroad Museum

Did you know before serving on the Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall worked on the B&O Railroad? A new exhibit at the B&O Railroad Museum explores the railroad’s African American history. Kris Hoellen, the museum’s executive director, tells us more.

Political Reform in Nineteenth-Century Maryland

Feb 8, 2019
of Johns Hopkins University Press

Just last year, Johns Hopkins University Press published a history of our state: the second edition of MARYLAND: A HISTORY, which covers 1634 to 2015. Today, co-author Sue Chapelle brings to life Maryland in the 1800s as she shares a chapter of the book, amended for radio. During this time, national, state, and local governments became more involved in social and economic problems than they were previously. Some alliances were undermined, new ones were formed, and Maryland saw the introduction of political machines.

Deepening Student Engagement with History Through Art

Jan 31, 2019
Barnesville School of Arts and Sciences

How can schools and museums team up to give students agency and deepen their engagement with history? The Sandy Spring Museum in Montgomery County and the Barnesville School of Arts and Sciences recently collaborated for a student exhibit entitled, “Honoring Our Past, Celebrating the Future.” The museum’s Marketing Director, Lauren Peirce, and the school’s art teacher, Sarah Eargle, tell us more.

The Humanities and Young Baltimoreans (Encore)

Jan 24, 2019
Jordannah Elizabeth

Published in LA Weekly and Ms. Magazine, Baltimore native Jordannah Elizabeth returned home to teach after the Baltimore uprising. She talks about the impact of her mother instilling a love for reading at a young age, her love for the humanities, and their value for a young person in Baltimore City.

This is a re-broadcast. 

Continuing Poe’s Legacy

Jan 17, 2019

This Saturday, January 19th,  marks the 210th birthday of Edgar Allan Poe. How is one organization celebrating the occasion and honoring the impact Poe continues to have on the arts, humanities, and pop culture? Enrica Jang, Director of The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum/Poe Baltimore, tells us more.

The Great Migration in Prince George’s County

Jan 10, 2019

Between 1910 and 1970, six million African Americans left the South in order to escape racial violence there. Dubbed “The Great Migration,” Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson reminds us that these people fled not only horrific physical violence but “human rights abuses and exclusion from voting and citizenship.” An exhibit from The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission examines The Great Migration in Prince George’s County, as well as migration and immigration that followed there. Dr. Dennis Doster, Manager of the Commission’s Black History Program, tells us more about the exhibit, called Moving Out, Moving In, Moving Up. 

Music in the Stacks at Peabody Library

Jan 2, 2019
Kelsey Ross, courtesy of In the Stacks

This year, Baltimore Magazine named In the Stacks one of eleven local organizations moving classical music forward. The series produces classical music concerts in the George Peabody Library, with programming inspired by the library’s contents and history. Horn player Sam Bessen, Founder and Artistic Director of In the Stacks, tells us more.

Better Living Through Humanities (Encore)

Dec 26, 2018
Dr. Jim Salvucci

What is the importance of the humanities to the future of our nation? Dr. Jim Salvucci, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty at Buena Vista University offers this reflection of how the humanities bring meaning to our lives.

Poetry, Perspectives, and Echoes from the Margins

Dec 20, 2018

How can poetry strengthen community and offer new perspectives? Dr. Elizabeth Jones, Associate Professor of English at Wor-Wic Community College in Salisbury, offers up some concrete examples. She tells us about Echoes from the Margins, a speaker series celebrating the 30th year of the college’s literary magazine, Echoes & Visions.

Gender, Finance, and Confidence (Encore)

Dec 13, 2018

Many people debate over how to categorize economics. It is science? Social science? Social studies? If it’s separated from the humanities, economist James D. Campbell asks, “don’t we neglect to show the next generation how to see and hear the humanistic as it relates to the organization of our economies, our world?” Amanda Cuocci of Stansberry Research talks about gender, confidence, and financial literacy. 

Undesign the Redline

Dec 6, 2018
Howard County Library System

Redlining is the practice of denying a credit-worthy applicant a loan for housing in a certain neighborhood, even though the applicant may otherwise be eligible for the loan. Redlining on a racial basis has been held by the courts to be an illegal practice. What are the roots of redlining and what effects does it still have today? How can we begin to think about a solution to redlining’s impact? Howard County Library System hosts Undesign the Redline, an interactive exhibit, now through December 31. Christie Lassen, Director of Communications and Partnerships at Howard County Library System, tells us more about the history of redlining.

Maryland's Unsung Heroines

Nov 29, 2018
The Maryland Women’s Heritage Center

How can we honor significant Maryland women who may not show up in our history books? The Maryland Women’s Heritage Center offers one example with its Unsung Heroines exhibit. The Center is an outgrowth of the Maryland Women’s History Project that began in 1980 as a collaborative venture between the Maryland Commission for Women and the Maryland State Department of Education. Executive Director Diana Bailey tells us more about the exhibit.

Maryland Culinary History

Nov 22, 2018
KARA MAE HARRIS

Kara Harris has spent eight years researching Maryland culinary history. She travels the state and sometimes the country to research cookbooks from over a hundred years ago. Four years ago, she turned her hobby into a blog, Old Line Plate. Harris tells us more about what cookbooks can tell us about our state’s history.

Guardian Baltimore

How can we trace cultural history through dance? What can dance tell us about belonging to a culture or nation? Breai Mason-Campbell from Guardian Baltimore, a dance cooperative that performs, preserves and passes on African American folk traditions, tells us more.

The Lived Black Experience on Mount Harmon Plantation

Nov 8, 2018
kamifletcher.weebly.com

Early this year, Dr. Kami Fletcher began researching and writing the history of slavery, indentured servants, and tenant farmers at Mount Harmon Plantation at World's End in Cecil County. When she began the project, only one enslaved person in the history of this plantation was known. Through her research, she has found 135. The Associate Professor of African American history at Delaware State University tells us more about her research.

Creative Expression in Older Adults

Nov 1, 2018

Did you know that Maryland has its own journal and press dedicated to older writers?  The mission of Passager, in residence at the University of Baltimore, is to empower the imagination in older people by giving a forum for creative expression. Kendra Kopelke, founding co-Editor of Passager, tells us more about the twenty-eight-year-old journal and press, and upcoming events. 

Hip-Hop Shakespeare with Fools and Madmen

Oct 26, 2018
(Left) Sarah Weissman, (Right) Fools and Madmen

This past spring, Josh Thomas and Caitlin Carbone wrote and produced a hip-hop adaptation of Shakespeare’s KING LEAR. The duo, who goes by “fools and madmen,” took their production to 6 Baltimore City Public Schools and performed for over 250 students. They also produced the show for the general public in Baltimore. Their next show, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, premieres in May and will travel to 10 schools. Thomas and Carbone tell us more about their work.

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