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Elections

Local election coverage from WYPR programs and newsroom.

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Today on Midday, we continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates who are running to be the next Mayor of Baltimore City.

Tom's guest is former Mayor Sheila Dixon, who held the office from 2007-2010. She resigned in 2010 following a conviction for embezzlement and an Alford plea in a separate case in which she was charged with perjury. She is one of 15 Democratic candidates running in the April 28 primary.

Before her resignation, Ms. Dixon had a long career in local public service -- on the City Council for 12 years and then as City Council president for seven years.  When then-Mayor Martin O’Malley became governor of Maryland, Dixon completed his term as mayor and she was elected to her own term later that year. As part of her plea agreement in conjunction with her conviction she agreed to resign from office, and she was prohibited from running for public office for a period of four years.

Ms. Dixon ran for mayor again in 2016. She narrowly lost the Democratic primary to Catherine Pugh, and she garnered more than 51,000 votes in the general election as a write-in candidate. Now, she is running for mayor for a third time.

We livestreamed this conversation on WYPR’s Facebook page. Click here to watch.

Courtesy of Dr. Terri Hill for Congress Campaign

Today on Midday we continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates. Tom's guest is a member of the Maryland House of Delegates.

Delegate Terri Hill is a Democrat who is running to succeed Elijah Cummings in Congress, representing Maryland’s 7th Congressional District. Del. Hill is running in a crowded field of 24 Democrats. Terri Hill is a physician who grew up in Columbia, MD. She earned her undergraduate degree from Harvard University and her medical degree from Columbia University in New York. She is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon who has practiced medicine in the Baltimore metropolitan area for nearly 30 years.

Dr. Hill was first elected to the Maryland House of Delegates in 2014. She represents parts of Baltimore and Howard Counties and serves on the Health and Government Operations Committee.

We livestreamed this conversation on the WYPR Facebook page. Click here to watch the video.

Wikimedia.com

Our series of Conversations with the Candidates continues as Tom is joined in the studio by Delegate Talmadge Branch, a veteran state lawmaker who has represented Baltimore and the 45th District in the Maryland House since 1995.  He has also been the Democratic Majority Whip since 2007.

Del. Branch is a candidate, running in a crowded field of 24 Democrats (and 8 Republicans), for the 7th District U.S. Congressional seat vacated by the recent death of Representative Elijah Cummings.

In Annapolis, Mr. Branch has served on the House Ways and Means committee; he’s a member of the Legislative Policy Committee and the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus. He chairs the alcoholic beverages subcommittee, and is the former House Chair of the Joint Committee on Welfare Reform.

Courtesy of Liz Matory

Republican candidate Liz Matory joins us for another in  our series of Conversations with the Candidates.  Matory is an author and the CEO of a small publishing house called Liberty Lives Media. She holds a BA from Columbia University, a law degree from Howard University, and an MBA from the University of MD.

Ms. Matory is mounting her third campaign for Congress after unsuccessful bids in two other districts.     

We live-streamed this conversation the WYPR Facebook page.  Click here to watch the video. 

Tom's next guest in today's Conversations with the Candidates is Dr Mark Gosnell, a Democratic candidate in the 7th District.

Dr. Gosnell is the Director of the Intensive Care Unit at Medstar Harbor Hospital and also the chief of pulmonary medicine there.  This is his first run for public office.  Healthcare is one of his chief policy concerns.  

We livestreamed this conversation on the WYPR Facebook page.  Click here to watch the video. 

Courtesy of Kimberly Klacik

Our Conversation with the Candidates series continues with Kimberly Klacik, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Congress. 

Klacik is a GOP strategist and activist who lives in Baltimore County.  She is the Executive Director and Founder of “Potential Me,” a nonprofit which provides works with disadvantaged women. 

We livestreamed this conversation on the WYPR Facebook page.  Click here to watch the video.  

Blueprint Montage courtesy OSI-Baltimore

Now, a conversation about the Blueprint for Baltimore.  It's a project supported by The Open Society Institute-Baltimore and the T.Rowe Price Foundation, in partnership with several community groups --  including Black Leaders Organizing for Change (BLOC), CASA, Baltimore Votes, Black Girls Vote, and the No Boundaries Coalition.  The goal  of Blueprint for Baltimore is to survey as many as 12,000 Baltimore City residents – the largest issue-oriented survey in city history – about their priorities for the city on a range of public policy issues, including education, public safety, and housing, as the race for Mayor, City Council President and City Council move into high gear. 

Joining Tom in the studio is Evan Serpick. He’s OSI’s Director of Strategic Communications, and was closely involved in the development of the survey.

Also joining us are project partners Tre Murphy, the co-founder and operations director for BLOC; and Lydia Walther-Rodriquez, Baltimore Regional Director for CASA of Maryland, a group that advocates for the state’s Latino and immigrant communities.

The Blueprint for Baltimore survey -- which can also be taken online -- concludes Sunday, December 8.

This conversation was livestreamed on WYPR's Facebook page. Watch the video here.

Photo Courtesy / Higginbotham for Congress

Today, it’s another in our series of Conversations with the Candidates ahead of the special primary election to fill the 7th District congressional seat vacated by the death of Elijah Cummings.

In all, 32 candidates will be on the Republican and Democratic special primary election ballot in February, vying as well for the nomination in the primary elections on April 28th.   

Tom is joined today in Studio A by F. Michael Higginbotham.  He is a legal scholar and professor, who has taught at the University of Baltimore School of Law since 1988.

He holds an undergraduate degree from Brown University, and law degrees from the Yale Law School and Cambridge University.   

nickjmosby.com

Delegate Nick Mosby formally launched his campaign for Baltimore City Council President on Tuesday. 

In a campaign video, the Democrat highlighted his experience at City Hall as a former councilman and in the House of Delegates in Annapolis.

Baltimore City Hall

 

After months of speculation, Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott has officially entered the 2020 mayoral race, becoming the first elected official to do so.

 

The 35-year-old announced his campaign in north Baltimore on Friday morning, surrounded by family members and a group of leaders from the second district, which he represented as a councilman, as well as other city leaders.

 

Rachel Baye

Maryland voters overwhelmingly backed a second term for Republican Gov. Larry Hogan Tuesday, but at the same time they rejected several Republican candidates for state and local offices.

On Wednesday, state leaders reflected on what that means — or doesn’t mean — for the state.

Olszewski's Baltimore County Transition Begins Today

Nov 7, 2018
John Lee

Baltimore County’s next county executive, Democrat Johnny Olszewski,  will take office in one month, which means he has to put together a transition team quickly, starting the morning after the election.

“We’re going to have to assemble a plan to build a diverse team that reflects the strength of our county and welcome and solicit even more feedback about what people want to see for their neighborhoods,” he said Tuesday night.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Governor Larry Hogan easily won re-election Tuesday, the first Republican governor to do so since Theodore McKeldin in 1954.

As the polls predicted, Hogan won a blow-out victory, besting Democrat Ben Jealous by 16 points.

He took the stage at his victory party at the Westin Hotel in Annapolis in a room packed with more than a thousand family members, friends and supporters, jubilant that he had won again in a state with a two-to-one Democratic edge in voter registration.

AP PHOTO/PATRICK SEMANSKY

Tom Hall and Mileah Kromer, the director of the Sarah T. Hughes Field Politics Center at Goucher College, discuss Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ben Jealous' strategy to get a million votes and how economic issues played a role in voters' decision to support Jealous or incumbent Republican Governor Larry Hogan. 

Tom spoke with Mileah earlier this evening.

Rachel Baye

WYPR reporter Rachel Baye gives Tom Hall a rundown of voting problems around Maryland, including issues with accessibility, polls that opened late, long waits, and power outages. 

Tom spoke with Rachel earlier this evening. 

NPR


 

WYPR reporter Karen Hosler joins Tom to discuss the future of Maryland’s Congressional districts. Democrats have controlled the state's electoral map for the last 50 years, but if Republican Governor Larry Hogan is re-elected his administration may be responsible for outlining new Congressional districts.

Tom spoke with Karen earlier this evening. 

OLSZEWSKI AND REDMER CAMPAIGNS

Tom Hall checks in with WYPR reporter John Lee, who is with the John Olszewski Jr. campaign tonight, about what the race for Baltimore County Executive means for the state of Maryland. A win for Olszewski could indicate that a blue wave is real, while a victory for Al Redmer, Jr. would signify a Republican stronghold. 

Tom spoke with John earlier this evening.

Mileah Kromer

Much of WYPR's reporting on statewide and local elections was live, but you can hear a few of Tom Hall's interviews below.

The latest Maryland election news from NPR.

Credit (L) @MBCarozzaSenate/Twitter, (R) Joel McCord

 

With the polls opening Tuesday, Maryland Republicans are hoping to break Democrats’ veto-proof majority in the state Senate by flipping five seats — an effort Republican leaders have dubbed the “drive for five.”

They’re looking at two districts in Baltimore County, one in Frederick County and one on the lower Eastern Shore, where incumbent Senator Jim Mathias is locked in a tough race with first term Delegate Mary Beth Carozza.

Mary Rose Madden / wypr

Back in 2008 and again in 2012 Maryland lawmakers and gambling advocates sold voters on slots and casinos by telling them all that revenue would boost the state's education budget. But that money only replaced existing funds rather than adding to them.

So, come Election Day in Maryland this year, voters will get to decide on an amendment to the state Constitution that would require that gambling revenues slated for schools be used to supplement existing money rather than replace it.

WYPR's General Election 2018 Coverage

Oct 31, 2018
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

The WYPR News Team has been following the race for Baltimore County ExecutiveMidday has interviewed more than a dozen candidates for their 'Conversations with the Candidates' series, and below you'll find stories and interviews on election-related issues from On the Record, and more.   

You can listen and watch WYPR's live election coverage on November 6 from 8 pm - 11 pm. Find your polling place here

Photo courtesy of the U.S. Senate

Today, another installment in our series of Conversations with the Candidates.

Tom’s guest in Studio A is Sen. Ben Cardin.  Sen. Cardin has been a fixture in Maryland politics since 1967, when he was first elected to the House of Delegates.  He was Speaker of the House for eight years -- the youngest person in state history to hold that position.  He was elected to Congress in 1987, and twenty years later, he was elected to the U.S. Senate.

Sen. Cardin is the Ranking Member of the Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee.  He is a senior member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and a member of the Environment & Public Works and Finance committees.

We live-streamed this 30-minute conversation on WYPR's Facebook page.

John Lee

 

 

The first day of early voting brought out long lines of voters throughout Maryland Thursday. 

It also brought out the political big guns in Baltimore County, where a Democrat and Republican are locked in a tight race for County Executive.

 

Rachel Baye

As voters head to the polls starting Thursday for early voting, they will be asked to approve an amendment to the state constitution to allow citizens to register to vote on Election Day.

John Lee

In their final debate, the candidates for Baltimore County Executive differed over affordable housing, Pre-Kindergarten, and how to treat people who live in the country illegally. 

 

The final forum between Republican Al Redmer and Democrat Johnny Olszewski came two weeks before election day.

 

 

An ad released this week by Gov. Larry Hogan’s campaign spends four minutes lauding the governor’s accomplishments on more than a dozen transportation projects.

Through a series of television news clips and video of press conferences, the ad describes how Hogan advanced efforts to widen I-270, the Capital Beltway, the Baltimore Beltway and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway; extended the I-95 North toll lanes; and lowered tolls — among other things.

John Lee

The kind of development that has led to overcrowded schools and monster traffic jams was a huge issue in the primary race for Baltimore County Executive. 

 

But with less than three weeks to go before the general election, neither candidate is making overdevelopment a major focus of his campaign.

 

 

John Lee

The executive and legislative branches of the Baltimore County government currently are in the hands of Democrats. But county Republicans are hoping to gain control of the government come election day. WYPR's John Lee talked with Morning Edition host Nathan Sterner about the GOP strategy.

 

Rachel Baye

Democratic candidate for governor Ben Jealous is accusing Gov. Larry Hogan of mocking his speech impairment.

The dispute stems from a video Hogan’s campaign posted online on Monday. The roughly 30-second video shows Jealous mixing up his words — saying “Virginia” when he means Maryland and “president” when he means governor.

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