Juneteenth And Tulsa: Reflections On America's Bloody Past Amid Current Racial Tensions | WYPR

Juneteenth And Tulsa: Reflections On America's Bloody Past Amid Current Racial Tensions

Jun 19, 2020

Stern Ferguson wears a mask during a drive through Juneteenth 2020 celebration in Dallas on Friday. Juneteenth marks the day in 1865 when federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, to ensure that all enslaved people were freed.
Credit AP Photo/LM Otero

In June, 1921, White mobs destroyed Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Greenwood neighborhood, a thriving African American community known as Black Wall Street.  An estimated 200 to 300 African Americans were killed during the attack.  Perhaps as many as 10,000 people were left homeless. 

There has been renewed interest in this bloody chapter in America’s history because President Trump is set to hold a campaign rally in Tulsa tomorrow.  The rally was originally scheduled to take place Friday, on Juneteenth, but the date was changed after a national outcry.

Washington Post reporter DeNeen L. Brown joins Tom to discuss the significance of Juneteenth, the sacred space that the Tulsa massacre holds in our history, and the event's significance for race relations in the current moment. 

You can read DeNeen L. Brown's moving essay, 'Black people are tired of trying to explain racism, here.