Camila Domonoske | WYPR

Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Updated at 8:18 a.m. ET on Sept. 10

A police officer in Dallas has been arrested after she shot and killed a young man inside his own apartment on Thursday night, saying later that she mistakenly believed she had entered her own home.

The officer, Amber Guyger, 30, was issued a warrant for manslaughter by the 7th District Court in Dallas County, the Texas Rangers said in a statement on Sunday. "The investigation is ongoing and no additional information is available at this time," the statement said.

Debbie Van Horn, a former trainer with USA Gymnastics who worked with disgraced sports doctor Larry Nassar, has been arrested in Texas and charged with one count of sexual assault of a child.

Van Horn and Nassar worked together at Karolyi Ranch, the former USA Gymnastics training facility outside of Huntsville, Texas.

Van Horn, who was indicted in June, was arrested Thursday at Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport, according to a statement from the Walker County District Attorney's office. Van Horn was arriving on a flight from China, the statement says.

Updated at 8:55 p.m. ET

The attorneys general of New York and New Jersey have launched investigations into sexual abuse by Catholic clergy in their states, and are asking residents with allegations of abuse to call dedicated hotlines.

New York is conducting a civil investigation into "how the dioceses and other church entities ... reviewed and potentially covered up allegations of extensive sexual abuse of minors," as well as potential criminal investigations into acts of abuse themselves.

The second murder trial of Nicholas Slatten, the former Blackwater contractor accused of firing the first shots in a shooting that killed more than a dozen unarmed civilians, has ended in a mistrial.

After weeks of deliberations, the jury could not reach a unanimous verdict, and U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth declared a mistrial on Wednesday.

The future of the case is unclear; attorneys for both sides will meet Sept. 14 to discuss the options, including the possibility of a third trial.

A kangaroo of unknown origin is on the loose in Austria, raising eyebrows in the area around Hellmonsodt and causing confusion on the Internet.

Kangaroos are, of course, indigenous to Australia.

Austria is, of course, not Australia.

But there's a marsupial hopping about in Upper Austria, and no one knows why.

The suspected kangaroo — we add a caveat because it could well be a wallaby instead — has been seen "numerous times" over the past week or so, according to Agence France-Presse.

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

In a surprise announcement on Tuesday, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel said he will not be seeking a third term in office in the 2019 election.

Emanuel, a former congressman and White House chief of staff, has come under heavy criticism in recent years for an increase in gun violence in the city and tense police-community relations as a result of police shootings. He has also struggled to get a handle on rising pension debt.

But the announcement that he is walking away from the mayor's office is a political stunner.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET Wednesday

A powerful typhoon made landfall in western Japan, causing extensive damage and multiple deaths.

At least 11 people have died as a result of Typhoon Jebi, the most powerful storm to hit the country in a quarter century, according to Japan's Kyodo news service. The Japan Times newspaper puts the number of injured at 110.

Ever since July, Poland has been captivated by a nationwide hunt for a missing 16-foot python, which remains on the loose in the suburbs of Warsaw.

The full epic tale was laid out in the Wall Street Journal this week.

A hospital in Texas has cut ties with a nurse who apparently posted about a young patient with the measles in a Facebook group dedicated to "anti-vaxxers," people who reject the scientific evidence of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.

Screenshots show a self-identified nurse saying the sick child's symptoms helped her understand why people vaccinate their children, but that "I'll continue along my little non-vax journey with no regrets."

A federal judge in Washington State has extended a court order blocking a Texas-based company called Defense Distributed from posting designs for 3D-printed guns on the Internet.

U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik previously issued a temporary restraining order at the end of July blocking the designs; now he has granted a preliminary injunction, which bars the designs from being posted online until a court case is resolved.

The mass killings of Rohingya in Myanmar's Rakhine State constitute genocide and top military commanders should face prosecution for crimes against humanity, a team of United Nations investigators has concluded.

After an eruption of intense violence last August, hundreds of thousands of Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority group, fled Buddhist-majority Myanmar to escape horrific massacres, mass rapes and the torching of their villages.

A lengthy drought in Europe has exposed carved boulders, known as "hunger stones," that have been used for centuries to commemorate historic droughts — and warn of their consequences.

The Associated Press reports that hunger stones are newly visible in the Elbe River, which begins in the Czech Republic and flows through Germany.

"Over a dozen of the hunger stones, chosen to record low water levels, can now be seen in and near the northern Czech town of Decin near the German border," the AP writes.

Reality Winner, the former National Security Agency contractor who pleaded guilty to leaking classified intelligence to a media outlet, has been sentenced to more than five years in prison.

On Thursday, a federal judge in Georgia approved a plea deal that called for five years and three months in prison along with three years of supervision after release.

Winner, 26, also will have to complete 100 hours of community service once she is released.

Updated at 3:23 p.m. ET

John Somerindyke of the Fayetteville Police Department couldn't stop smiling.

"We made an arrest," he told a roomful of reporters on Wednesday. "Finally."

For more than 10 years, police In Fayetteville, N.C., had been trying to identify a serial rapist. They had tied him to at least six rapes in the same neighborhood between 2006 and 2008. They called him the "Ramsey Street Rapist."

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

Jimmy Bennett, who accused actress Asia Argento of sexual assault in legal documents that were leaked to The New York Times, has issued a public statement for the first time since the Times story published on Sunday.

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Hungary's government has stopped providing food to adult asylum-seekers who have been denied but have appealed their cases, prompting outcry from human rights groups and intervention from the European Court of Human Rights.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET Wednesday

U.S. officials say a 95-year-old former Nazi labor camp guard named Jakiw Palij who lied about his wartime work when he immigrated to the United States has been deported to Germany.

Palij, who lived in Queens in New York City, was investigated and denaturalized more than a decade ago. His deportation was ordered in 2004. But for years, no country would take him in.

On Monday, he was sent to Germany, according to the State Department. The Department of Justice says Palij is the 68th Nazi removed from the U.S.

Cascades of tears. Lingering hugs. Family photos. And questions that have burned unanswered for decades.

For the first time in three years, North and South Korea are holding family reunions, allowing a small number of South Koreans to travel across the fortified border to the North to reunite with loved ones they haven't seen since the 1950s.

Such reunions have been held intermittently since the '80s and have resumed as relations between the North and South are thawing.

Updated at 12:52 p.m. ET

Italian actress Asia Argento, one of the most prominent voices in the #MeToo movement, paid $380,000 to a man who accused her of sexually assaulting him when he was 17, according to a report by The New York Times based on legal documents anonymously leaked to the paper.

A federal judge has sentenced Esteban Santiago to life in prison for carrying out a 2017 shooting in a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., airport that killed five people and injured six others.

U.S. District Judge Beth Bloom called Santiago's attack "85 seconds of evil" when she announced the sentence Friday.

Santiago had accepted a plea bargain, admitting guilt on 11 charges in exchange for prosecutors declining to seek the death penalty.

Seven years ago, Florida Gov. Rick Scott killed a federally funded project to build a high-speed train between Tampa and Orlando.

Scott now supports the idea of a similar train route — fueled by private investment instead. And the governor and his wife have invested millions of dollars with a company that stands to profit off such a project, as first reported by the Miami Herald.

Updated at 6:20 a.m. ET on Thursday

A suicide bombing in Kabul on Wednesday killed dozens of teenagers studying for university entrance exams at an educational center in a Shiite neighborhood, according to wire reports.

Updated at 1:13 p.m. ET

Los Angeles' public transit system has announced that it is the first in the U.S. to purchase millimeter wave scanners to screen Metro riders for suspicious objects as they move through stations.

The technology "will help detect weapon and explosive device security threats on the county's transit system," the system says in a joint press release with the Transportation Security Administration on Tuesday.

A spokesman for the LA Metro tells NPR that the system has ordered several units, at approximately $100,000 each.

Dozens of cars were set on fire overnight in western Sweden, in a series of attacks that Swedish authorities suspect may have been coordinated on social media.

Up to 80 cars were torched in Gothenburg, Sweden's second-largest city, as well as other nearby towns, Radio Sweden reports. Authorities say that groups of masked young people are responsible.

And the country's leaders are not happy.

This week, the Puy du Fou theme park in western France put some new employees in the field: six trained rooks, members of the crow family, picking up small pieces of paper and cigarette butts in exchange for food.

Boubou, Bamboo, Bill, Black, Bricole and Baco officially started their new gigs on Monday.

For the record, the park would like to note, the corvid colleagues are not replacing any human cleaning staff.

For three days in a row, throngs of protesters took to the streets in Romania's capital city, Bucharest, to protest what they see as a corrupt government and to call for new elections.

Tens of thousands of people rallied Friday on the first day of demonstrations, which were largely organized by Romanian expatriates who came home to demonstrate en masse; some estimates put the crowd at 100,000.

Every summer, the Perseid meteor shower brings a cascade of shooting stars to the night sky.

And this year, it has done us all the favor of arriving right after a new moon — allowing the meteors to show off without lunar competition.

The meteor shower will peak late Sunday night and early Monday morning, but you can also catch a good number of meteors in the middle of the night on Saturday.

So if you happen to be out late this Saturday, take a moment to look up.

The United Kingdom has decided to allow a 9-year-old chess prodigy to remain in the country, after his father's work visa expired and his family faced deportation back to India.

Shreyas Royal is "very delighted" with the news, his father tells NPR by email.

Thousands of members of China's Hui Muslim minority have gathered at the site of a mosque in Weizhou, in northwestern China, in an attempt to block the government from demolishing the building.

Protesters told some reporters that the government proposed altering the building to make it look more traditionally Chinese, instead of demolishing it, but that the Muslim community rejected that proposal.

Damaging aftershocks continue in Indonesia days after a powerful earthquake hit the island of Lombak, as the country struggles to care for the injured and displaced and the death toll rises into the hundreds.

Indonesia's top security minister says the death toll from the earthquake on Sunday has risen to 319, according to The Associated Press.

The country's disaster mitigation agency says the death toll is at least 259, Reuters says. The chief of a search and rescue agency told the AP the death toll is at 227 as of Thursday.

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