© 2021 WYPR
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
14192560_901167863321189_7340593112077558402_n.jpg

Aaron Henkin

Producer of "Out of the Blocks" and Director of New Local Programming

Aaron creates and produces original radio programs for WYPR. His current project is the neighborhood documentary series, Out of the Blockswhich earned the 2018 national Edward R Murrow Award. His past work includes the long-running weekly cultural program, The Signal, and the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings series, Tapestry of the Times. Aaron's stories have aired nationally on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, PRI’s Studio 360, & The World.

  • We’ll hear from a clinical psychologist who asks: After the psychological stress of the pandemic, what will it take for us to unlearn the habit of social distancing? Plus, Baltimore County Executive Johnny Olszewski proposes a $30 million funding increase for the county’s school system. And the County Council worries about the noise complaints that might come with expanding live entertainment permits.
  • Maryland will stop administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine today after federal health agencies called for a pause in its use. Dr. Leana Wen says the FDA & CDC recommendation is precautionary and is no cause to second-guess the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in general. And the Maryland General Assembly has just wrapped up a historic legislative session – we have the highlights.
  • The Maryland General Assembly wraps up its annual session tonight at midnight in what’s been an historic session. We take a look at its major legislative accomplishments, including a final bill to reform the parole process over Republican objections. Plus: Baltimore Mayor Brandon Scott gives an update on the city’s ongoing vaccination efforts.
  • Today, Robert Kanter is an international recovery and family advocate. When he talks about addiction, he speaks from experience. At one point, Robert's drug and alcohol use had destroyed his life. After he recovered, he almost lost his daughter to an overdose. Robert talks with Theo about his family's own journey and the work he does now to support other families suffering from addiction.
  • All Maryland adults are now eligible to register for a COVID-19 vaccine. With infection numbers up in Baltimore, city officials urge residents to stay cautious over the holiday weekend. And advocates for Baltimore renters say a bill being considered by the City Council will only help landlords.
  • Maryland will get billions of federal dollars to help residents hit hard by the pandemic, and there’s bipartisan agreement on how to spend it. National polls show Republicans are less likely to get a COVID-19 vaccine, but some Baltimore County republican lawmakers scoff at a few of the theories swirling about. And the Maryland General Assembly considers bills that would change the way those sentenced to long prison terms are treated.
  • The state’s Acting Secretary of Health, Dennis Schrader, moves a step closer to becoming the head of the Maryland’s Health Department. And new training for Baltimore City officials aims to change how trauma is addressed and healed.
  • The top headlines of the day, plus reporter Sarah Y Kim takes us on a tour through the mass vaccination site at Baltimore’s M&T Bank Stadium.
  • All Baltimore City residents over the age of 16 are now encouraged to pre-register for a Covid-19 vaccine. We'll hear from an OBGYN encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated. Baltimore County contemplates summer school to combat learning loss created by remote learning. Plus, could funding from the American Rescue Plan provide an opportunity to re-envision the country’s educational system?
  • Baltimore City residents are now getting priority at one of the state’s mass vaccination sites. Health experts say the Covid vaccine is safe for pregnant women. And housing advocates say Maryland lawmakers need to act now to prevent an eviction crisis.