Aaron Henkin | WYPR

Aaron Henkin

Producer of "Out of the Blocks" and Director of New Local Programming

Aaron creates and produces original radio programs for WYPR. His current project is the neighborhood documentary series, Out of the Blockswhich earned the 2018 national Edward R Murrow Award. His past work includes the long-running weekly cultural program, The Signal, and the Smithsonian Folkways Recordings series, Tapestry of the Times. Aaron's stories have aired nationally on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, PRI’s Studio 360, & The World.

Ways to Connect

The Daily Dose 5-21-20

May 21, 2020
Baltimore County

Varying states of emergency and uneven restrictions across the state have local leaders on the defensive with their constituents. And we talk with a palliative care specialist about her role as a bridge between isolated COVID-19 patients and their families.

The Daily Dose 5-20-20

May 20, 2020
JOSE LUIS MAGANA/AP

A new WYPR poll shows how Baltimore feels about voting by mail. Baltimore County Public Schools prepare for an influx of private school students. And two Maryland companies are helping to train a new workforce.

The Daily Dose 5-19-20

May 19, 2020

When it comes to COVID-19 statistics, the Native American community is funneled into the category of ‘other.’ What does that mean for accessing proportionate resources? Plus: A medical systems CEO reckons with the bitter irony of empty emergency rooms and staff furloughs, all in the midst of a pandemic.

The Daily Dose 5-18-20

May 18, 2020
AP/JULIO CORTEZ

Maryland doctors speak out against crowded immigration detention centers. City voters have to wait a bit longer to get their ballots. A new study highlights the risk of eviction for some black Baltimore residents. And Maryland’s transit system tries to accommodate essential workers safely.

The Daily Dose 5-15-20

May 15, 2020

Governor Hogan’s re-opening of the state began today, but some county leaders are being more cautious. Strike teams are trying to curb the rate of deaths and infections at nursing homes. And a Baltimore non-profit is helping unemployed residents find their footing, emotionally and financially.

The Daily Dose 5-14-20

May 14, 2020
CHARM TV

Maryland is on the eve of its first stage of reopening. The mayor of Baltimore says its COVID-19 curve has not been sufficiently flattened. And the Baltimore County Council is trying to hold off on making massive budget cuts.

The Daily Dose 5-13-20

May 13, 2020
Rachel Baye

A special late-breaking edition of the podcast with news from Governor Larry Hogan about reopening Maryland. Also, problems persist with Maryland’s unemployment insurance website. Plus, a look at voting logistics for upcoming elections.

The Daily Dose 5-12-20

May 12, 2020
MDOT/MTA

Baltimore passes a bill to prohibit rent increases during a declared state of emergency. Police report that nearly empty highways are giving rise to reckless driving. And in Baltimore’s public transit system, reduced schedules and social distancing put a strain on riders and operators.

The Daily Dose 5-11-20

May 11, 2020
Francisco Àvia_Hospital Clínic / Flickr Creative Commons

School officials in Baltimore County believe all students now have the tools they need to finish the school year on-line. And one Maryland doctor reflects on how treating COVID-19 patients is an emotional drain and a blessing.

Wendel Patrick

Well, this long-overdue episode wasn’t originally intended to be an audio time-capsule, but, you know… life.  Here’s a final look back at a venerable city market that’s now temporarily closed to the public, and partly demolished.

The Daily Dose 5-8-20

May 8, 2020
WIDE ANGLE YOUTH MEDIA

All the day’s top news, plus a story about one annual high school tradition that will not be cancelled this year: Prom 2020 goes live on-line across Baltimore and beyond, thanks to the ingenuity and determination of the young minds at Wide Angle Youth Media.  

The Daily Dose 5-7-20

May 7, 2020
Credit Rachel Baye / WYPR

Maryland’s governor eases restrictions on some outdoor activities. A heated debate over easing fees on Baltimore County developers is settled. Maryland’s treasurer says employees at state-run facilities need better protection. And researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine test an experimental COVID-19 vaccine.

The Daily Dose 5-6-20

May 6, 2020
Credit AP/PATRICK SEMANSKY

Baltimore City’s budget gets even leaner in its latest revision. In Baltimore County, easing Impact Fees for developers draws political ire. And there’s help for those having the hardest time dealing with this pandemic, emotionally and psychologically.

The Daily Dose 5-5-20

May 5, 2020
photo credit EMILY SULLIVAN

Maryland lawmakers challenge the governor’s stay-at-home orders. The old Bethlehem Steel site might be an economic bright spot for the county. The first COVID-19 death is reported at a state psychiatric hospital. And the “Y” steps in to help children of essential workers.

The Daily Dose 5-4-20

May 4, 2020

State officials call for more federal relief funds for Baltimore City. Advocates aim to prevent a spike in evictions that could coincide with the lifting of Maryland’s state of emergency. And foreign migrant workers find themselves excluded from federal aid.

Baltimore county pleads for more federal funds to plug a massive budget hole. Organizers of Open Up Maryland prepare to rally this weekend, but a new poll suggests its supporters are in the minority. Plus: How are local farmers handling the toll that COVID-19 has taken on commodities markets?

The Daily Dose 4-30-20

Apr 30, 2020
Credit Jacques Ravel

Governor Hogan orders universal testing at nursing homes across Maryland. The University of Maryland School of Medicine will run tests for COVID-19, using robots. And Congressman Anthony Brown addresses racial disparities in infection and death rates from the virus.

The Daily Dose 4-29-20

Apr 29, 2020
LAUREN WATLEY, BALTIMORE COUNTY GOVERNMENT

A radically reduced Baltimore County budget can no longer guarantee job security for teachers, police officers, firefighters, or other county employees. In Baltimore City, a major election happened, modified for COVID-19. And we continue an ongoing conversation about the health and safety of those who live and work in the state’s nursing homes.

The Daily Dose 4-28-20

Apr 28, 2020
BALTIMORE COUNTY

The financial fallout of the pandemic is subjecting more families to food insecurity, and in Baltimore County, a patchwork of volunteers is trying to help. Plus: The dean of The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing talks about contact tracing, flattening the curve, and how front-line health care workers are bearing up under the strain.

The Daily Dose 4-27-20

Apr 27, 2020
Credit: AP Photo/Frank Franklin II.

Why are Maryland nursing care facilities are being hit so hard by COVID-19? And what information are those facilities required to share? Plus: Heard of Zoom Bombing? A cyber-security expert shares tips for keeping online meetings safe from interlopers.

The Daily Dose 4-24-20

Apr 24, 2020
Baltimore County

Maryland’s governor lays out his plan for getting to a new normal. Plus: Baltimore County opens new COVID-19 testing sites, and County Executive Johnny Olszewski joins us for an update on his bare-bones budget, the prospect of federal funding, and the health of Baltimore County residents.

The Daily Dose 4-23-20

Apr 23, 2020
YOUTUBE

Governor Hogan has plans for re-opening Maryland for business. Maryland’s deputy health secretary, Fran Phillips, talks about how to proceed with those plans safely. And some local musicians trade the stage for an alternate venue - the front porch.

The Daily Dose 4-22-20

Apr 22, 2020
FACEBOOK.COM/PG CO. CORRECTIONS DEPT.

Baltimore City State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby on mitigating the spread of COVID-19 in the prison system. And advice for small businesses on the next round of Paycheck Protection Program funding.

The Daily Dose 4-21-20

Apr 21, 2020

Baltimore’s Mayor announces a new COVID-19 testing site. In Baltimore County, more than half of businesses surveyed say they’re hurting. A second round of relief funding is on the way, but what can small businesses do to stay afloat now? And a local arts organization is finding ways to keep the community engaged and pay its artists and performers.

The Daily Dose 4-20-20

Apr 20, 2020

Maryland’s governor has secured a windfall of COVID-19 test kits. Some of the state’s low-risk inmates are being released to slow the spread of the Coronavirus. A local community college tries to help its students and the community. And, realistically, how close are we to developing a vaccine?

The Daily Dose 4-17-20

Apr 17, 2020

Maryland’s back-to-school date gets pushed back, again. Baltimore’s mayor asks food delivery apps to lower their fees. The city’s schools superintendent hears from parents about distance learning challenges. Plus, a report about ‘contact tracing,' the next crucial phase of pandemic management.

The Daily Dose 4-16-20

Apr 16, 2020

Governor Hogan lays out crucial steps that must happen before stay-at-home restrictions are eased. What happens when ‘sheltering in place’ actually harms some of our most vulnerable citizens? Baltimore county opens its first COVID-19 testing site, but test shortages limit capacity. And one of our own shares the experience of getting tested.

The Daily Dose 4-15-20

Apr 15, 2020

A new face-covering order is in effect for all Maryland residents. The state’s top judge orders early release for some prisoners. Baltimore’s mayor extends the city’s property tax sales deadline. Hospitals face drug shortages for COVID-19 patients. A first-person story of survival. And a worker shortage signals trouble for Maryland’s crab season.

The Daily Dose 4-14-20

Apr 14, 2020

COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc on Baltimore County's budget. Baltimore City Council tries to address the digital divide. Maryland teachers grapple with I-E-P plans. And Baltimore’s former Health Commissioner shares her personal experience with health workers on the front lines.

The Daily Dose 4-13-20

Apr 13, 2020

Baltimore County’s Executive wants a GM plant reopened to make ventilators. Engineers have figured out how to convert breast pumps into makeshift ventilators. The Maryland Food Bank faces increased demand and logistical complications. And Baltimore City playgrounds are blocked from use.

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