WYPR Features | WYPR

WYPR Features

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new novels from British rock critic Caitlin Moran.

@raylewis/Twitter

If you’ve ever seen a talent show from the famed Apollo Theater in Harlem, you know that at some point when an act has stayed long past its welcome, a fellow named Sandman would emerge, with a hook to usher the offending performer off the stage.

The original Sandman has gone on to his eternal rest, but we sure could use him, or a reasonable facsimile to assist Ray Lewis out of our consciousness.

RikkisRefuge Other/flickr

Catherine tells us what people should consider when mapping out a retirement budget.

Sawfish

Aug 3, 2018
The National Aquarium

Listen in to learn about the long tooth sawfish, a critically endangered but seriously fascinating member of the elasmobranch family. 

Irvine Nature Center/Facebook

A few days ago, one of our teachers pitched me an idea for a weekend program, something called “forest bathing.” I’ll admit I was skeptical at first as she listed the benefits promised by this Japanese practice: reduced stress, lower blood pressure, and increased mindfulness. How could “taking a bath” in the forest increase your well-being and how exactly does it work?

Maren Hassinger

Aug 3, 2018
Mitro Hood

Artist Maren Hassinger discuss how her sculptures came to incorporate everyday materials such as newspapers, wire, and plastic bags, as well as her 20-year career as director of the Rinehart School of Sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The BMA recently opened Maren Hassinger: The Spirit of Things, a solo exhibition with sculptures, drawings, photographs of performances, and videos that span the artist’s career. The exhibition is on view in the BMA’s contemporary wing through November 25, 2018.

On the Saturday afternoon of July 25, 1943, something unusual was going on in Baltimore’s Penn station on Charles Street just above Mt. Royal. In those wartime days, the station was a round-the-clock melee of soldiers and sailors and husbands and wives and lovers and loved ones embracing in hellos and goodbyes. That is why on this wartime Saturday afternoon a couple chose to get married in Penn Station, in a hurry--while they could still be together, only minutes before the groom was to depart for duty. The priest who married the couple invited each of the servicemen to kiss the bride, who in a gracious act of patriotism, went along--one kiss per serviceman!

Exercise does a body good. Everyone knows that. But new research points to even greater benefits, especially for the children of fathers who exercise regularly.

A study published in Cell Reports suggests that the physical activity of fathers may impact the brains and minds of their children. Physical activity strengthens neural connections, thus improving brain function, sharpening both memory and thinking. The process of changing neural connections also alters epigenetics—the regulators of our genes--- which are passed down which are passed down to our children.

Willa Banks

Aug 2, 2018

Benjamin Banneker is called “The first African-American man of science.” The Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum's Willa Banks talks about him and the "Stories in Textiles and Paper" exhibit.

For generations, the nation has relied upon family members to keep aging loved ones in their homes and to supply needed care. But today, many Americans are growing older without family nearby, resulting in an unprecedented caregiving crunch. As indicated by writer Clare Ansberry, the caregiving crunch comes at a time when many Americans reaching retirement age are in a financial squeeze not experienced by some prior generations.

Anirban on the lack of well-trained workers, Google's fine from the European Commission, price markups, and defining the "one percent" in different states. 

Part two of the the story of Montgomery County, Maryland native Rose O'Neale Greenhow, who worked as a spy for the Confederacy during the Civil War, sharing important military intelligence with fellow Southern sympathizers in Washington, DC.

Primitivo

Aug 1, 2018
Cameron Kennedy/flickr

If you like zinfandels, you should try primitivo. Al and Hugh share some of the "treasures" they've found.  

Click the links to purchase their recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits

wikipedia

This month, the U.S. Senate will be considering legislation that threatens to reverse historic progress in cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay.

On July 19, the Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives voted 213 to 202 – largely along partisan lines – to pass a budget amendment that would prohibit the federal Environmental Protection Agency from penalizing states that fail to meet pollution limits for the bay imposed by EPA in 2010.

The lead sponsor was Republican Congressman Bob Goodlatte of Virginia, an ally of the farm lobby, which went to court to contest the federal Bay pollution limits.

“The EPA cannot be allowed to railroad the states and micromanage the process,” Goodlatte said. “With this amendment, we are simply telling the EPA the important role that states play in implementing the Clean Water Act and preventing another federal power grab.”

Opening up the World!

Aug 1, 2018

Dr. Jen Reesman from the Kennedy Krieger Deafness Evaluation and More clinic shares a story about Dr. Danielle Previ, a Kennedy Krieger trainee, PhD and graduate of Gallaudet University who is deaf and inspires patients who are also deaf or hard of hearing, and their families, by being a living example of all that can be accomplished.

Click the headline to read a transcript of the audio. 

On this episode of The Weekly Reader, Marion Winik has two new titles to recommend for your next book club selections.

Rebecca Siegel/flickr

It's the time of the year when our local markets are at their prettiest, with all sorts of fresh fruits and vegetables coming our way. Among the most eye-catching are Maryland peaches, in their soft yellow and orange splendor. And there are so many great ways to enjoy peaches.

Tom Newby/flickr

The onset of football training camps serves as a reminder that there is no group of humans more inclined to obliviousness than college football coaches.

They consistently show an uncanny ability to tune the rest of the world out to focus on their team and their sport, often to their own embarrassment and the shame of the school.

We present, for your consideration, the recent contributions of leaders of two prominent programs to the assemblage of asinine utterings.

First up, North Carolina coach Larry Fedora, who told a gathering of media two weeks ago that it hadn’t been proven that football causes chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE.

Mental Health

Jul 31, 2018

Hector tells us about the Transamerica Center for Health Studies' recently-released mental health guide.

Let’s say you are in your forties and you haven’t been saving for retirement. Experts suggest that you had better get busy–now. According to the Economic Policy Institute, the average American 44 to 49 years old has a bit more than $81,000 in retirement savings. But that figure is heavily impacted by certain forty-somethings who have managed to save a lot of money for retirement already.  

Anirban tells us more. 

johnnysbmore/instagram

Its prime summer time and we are going to hear your favorite summer recipes. Tony and Chef Cindy also chat with a local coffee expert to give you some tips on making the best of your morning motivator.

Jennifer Palmieri

Jul 27, 2018
Andrew Duncan

Tom talks with Jennifer Palmieri, the former Director of Communications in the Obama White House and for the Hillary Clinton Presidential Campaign. 

Jennifer is recommending:

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

The Courting of Marcus Dupree by Willie Morris 

Jennifer Palmieri is the author of Dear Madame President: An Open Letter to the Women Who Will Run the World.

"Cut it Down"

Jul 27, 2018

A story about how Rivers Chambers and his band changed a country western lament to keep the party going. 

Anirban tells us about the conflict over H2B Visas, changing unemployment rates, inflationary pressures, national debt and wage differences in married couples. 

Early Music in Western Maryland

Jul 26, 2018

Did you know that bluegrass has origins outside of the United States? Pat Nordstrom from Mountainside Baroque, an early music collective based in Western Maryland and Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.

During the Civil War, Montgomery County, Maryland native Rose O'Neal Greenhow worked as a spy for the Confederacy, sharing important military intelligence with fellow Southern sympathizers in Washington, DC.

Aveleda of Portugal

Jul 26, 2018

Get a taste of Portugal with these Cellar Notes selections. Click the links to purchase Al and Hugh's recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits

Anirban on Millenials' decision to hold off on parenthood, the fluctuating 'middle class,' sizing up the U.S. economy, tax cuts and economic growth, and Geneva's expensive food scene. 

Wikipedia Commons

According to the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science, more than 40 percent of mammal species have experienced severe population declines over the last century, meaning that their range has shrunk more than 80 percent.

Almost 200 species of vertebrates have gone extinct over the last 100 years, a rate of about two extinctions per year. That’s 100 times the historic rate. Previous mass die-offs have been caused by asteroids, volcanos and other natural catastrophes. But this one has been triggered by human population growth, development, and climate change, scientists have concluded.

In the face of this rapid decline in biodiversity, a few things have worked to protect nonhuman life. Notably, in the U.S., the Endangered Species Act of 1973 has succeeded in saving several animals faced with elimination, including American alligators, whooping cranes, grizzly bears, peregrine falcons, California condors, the American gray wolf, and, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, the Delmarva fox squirrel.

On this episode of The Weekly Reader, we preview three Young Adult titles that are fun for slightly older fans as well as the teenagers in your house.

Pages