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WYPR Features

RikkisRefuge Other/flickr

Tens of millions of Americans are caregivers, and it has serious implications for their own retirement security. Catherine shares insights from a Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies report on caregivers.

The National Aquarium

The deep ocean is an extreme habitat, challenging and expensive to get to and to study. It is cold, under tremendous pressure from the weight of all the water above, and so very dark. It's mysterious, and completely foreign to us light-loving landlubbers. We know more about the surface of the moon than we do the bottom of the sea. The deep sea is not deserted, though, as was once thought.

Bats

Aug 21, 2018
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife

Sometimes when I mention that I have a bat house on my home, I see people visibly shudder. I can understand that reaction because bats, just like 8-legged arachnids and slithering reptiles, have a sordid on-screen history that makes a lot of people really uncomfortable.

Whole horror movie franchises have been built from our fear of bats. Vampire bats. Sewer bats. I even remember a grocery store tabloid with a terrifying image of a child with large, pointed ears and sharp incisors that read, “BAT CHILD FOUND IN CAVE.” No wonder we’re all a little nervous about them. But what I tell people who are bat-averse is to “try to think of them as furry nocturnal birds clearing the skies of the insects that spread diseases and damage our crops and gardens.” That’s because bats are the major predator performing a true ecological miracle every night. Just one bat can eat over a thousand insects each night. They work the night shift so other insect-eaters can get some shut eye.

Mount Vernon's Wonders

Aug 21, 2018
The Walters Art Museum

Julia Marciari-Alexander, executive director of the Walters Art Museum comments on the importance of Baltimore's Mount Vernon neighborhood. 

Anirban comments on the shrinking number of young construction workers, the housing market, wage increases, America's pension crisis, and seniors and bankruptcy. 

Nobska

Aug 17, 2018

The Inner Harbor along the Light Street quay on the soft spring evening of April 12, 1976, was alive with crowds and music. More than 500 of Baltimore’s beautiful people were milling about, shaking hands, congratulating one another.  The center of the festivities was the Grand Opening aboard the three-decker excursion steamer “Nobska,” majestic in white, sparkling in the late afternoon sun. It was presented as  Baltimore’s first floating—appropriately glamrous--restaurant. But the Nobska could not open because it was closed. Here’s the story.

 

Being a new parent is wonderful…and it can also be terrifying. Here are five secrets that often go under reported in parenting circles.

Retirement in Russia

Aug 16, 2018

You might have thought that you would be safe from discussion about Russia during a retirement segment.  You were wrong.  A newly proposed policy announced as many were watching the Russian national team defeat Saudi Arabia five to nil during the opening game of the World Cup would raise the Russian state pension age from sixty to sixty-five for men by twenty-twenty eight and from fifty five to sixty-three for women by twenty-thirty four.  Raising the retirement age to the mid-sixties hardly sounds like anything to be especially upset about, but many Russians are infuriated.  

Anirban tells us more. 

How can we trace cultural history through dance? What can dance tell us about belonging to a culture or nation? Breai Mason-Campbell from the dance cooperative Guardian Baltimore tells us more.

Tom Pelton

It was just after dawn when I set out paddling in my kayak to find nature in one of the least natural places on Earth.

I had launched into the Patapsco River from Fort Armistead Park near the base of the Francis Scott Key Bridge south of Baltimore. Truck traffic roared overhead on Route 695.   Ahead of me, the morning sun sparkled silver in a rippling path toward the old Sparrows Point steel mill.  Behind my back rose the smokestacks of a pair of coal-fired power plants, a chemical factory, sewage plant, and the mounded back of the city’s Quarantine Road landfill.

But the sky was blue, the breeze was balmy, and out on the water I felt away from it all.

Austrian Rosé

Aug 15, 2018

Get Al and Hugh's picks for Austrian rosé. Click the links to purchase their recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

CoinWeek

In August 1934, two young boys found a treasure trove of gold coins buried in the basement of a home located at 132 South Eden Street in East Baltimore. Their lives were never the same.

On this edition of The Weekly Reader, we review two new memoirs - one by the late Poet Laureate Donald Hall, and the other a debut by Glynnis MacNicol.

Gazpacho

Aug 15, 2018

Tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes!  They're really rolling in now, and the varieties seem endless.  Classics like Big Boy and Beef Steak, heirlooms like Cherokee Purple and German Stripe, and petite cherry and grape tomatoes are all out there.  Chef Jerry Pellegrino tells us, all this variety can be put to good use when you talk about making Gazpacho.

 

Uniting Community

Aug 14, 2018

Rev. Alvin C. Hathaway of Union Baptist Church tells us about some of the good things happening in Baltimore, and how we must continue to work together to create the community we desire. 

National Geographic

As a former Latin teacher, I’m always interested in the evolution of the English language. Civilizations that we consider to be ancient (or at least unbelievably old) still shape the words and phrases that we use every day. Those ancient people developed some pretty interesting ways of communicating what they were seeing and how they were experiencing the world around them. I’m always struck by the way that cultures from around the world have influenced our modern English language – and the animal kingdom is a great place to see language in action.

The National Aquarium

When you think of an animal that purrs, grunts, croaks or hums, I’ll bet it’s not a fish. But, I’ll let you in on a secret: More than 150 species of fish on the East Coast of the U.S. are what scientists call “somniferous.” They make noise. Lots of it.

Forget those dreamy underwater documentaries where all is peace and quiet. The ocean is like New York City at rush hour. There are thousands of species, and many have something to say. The tiny cusk eel sounds like a jackhammer. Damselfish purr. Long-horned sculpins hum like an iPhone set on “buzz."

Erin Berzel Photography

Hector tells us about extreme medical debt, even with insurance, and gives us the basics of paying for healthcare.

Jonas Boni/flickr

It’s open phones on this week’s episode. Tony and Chef Cindy take your calls and emails on everything from how to jazz up your instant ramen to how to care for a cast iron skillet. They also take your ingredient suggestions for the Chef Challenge. Tune in to find out what Tony does with a pound of butter and how Cindy handles a case of pilsner!

@THEREALJMCNAIR/TWITTER

It’s been 32 years since Len Bias’ death sent the University of Maryland lurching about for its soul.

When that search was over, the entire power structure of the athletic department and the university itself had been toppled and the school emerged sufficiently chastened with a better sense of right and wrong.

Three decades later, it may take another death, that of football player Jordan McNair, to force people at College Park and beyond to examine what the university and its athletics are really about.

Anirban comments on the foreign purchase of American homes, the slowing down of the U.S. housing market, state finances, entry-level jobs requirements and discrimination in office housework.  

 

Humanism in Archaeology

Aug 9, 2018

We know archaeology connects us to the past, but how does it reveal the humanity of our ancestors? Jane Cox, Chief of Historic Preservation for Anne Arundel County and Board Member for the Lost Towns Project, an Anne Arundel County-based nonprofit and recent Maryland Humanities grantee, tells us more.

Turns out that the Millennial generation, which is largely comprised of twenty and thirty-somethings, aren’t so different from the rest of us after all – well, at least in certain ways.  A recent Bankrate.com survey asked Millennials, who for these purposes are classified as Americans ages eighteen to thirty-seven, what the perfect time to retire would be. Listen to find out what that age is.

Zinfandels

Aug 8, 2018

Zinfandels go great with chunky barbequed meats. Al and Hugh tell us about some of their favorites. Click the links to purchase their recommendations at Kenilworth Wine & Spirits.

In 1836, Maryland native Ford McGill left the African colony of Liberia to attend medical school in America, where he faced discrimination before returning to Africa as a much needed doctor for his community.

Shhhh. Listen. Do you hear that? Kids and caregivers across the State are cheering! The State announced last week that annual income limits for Maryland’s Child Care Subsidy (CSS) Program will increase dramatically effective August 1st. This will significantly help more Maryland families access quality child care and early education programs.

“It is no exaggeration to say that as a result of this change, the future will also change for many low-income children in Maryland. Today we celebrate with them,” Margaret E. Williams, Executive Director, Maryland Family Network said about the news.

Tom Pelton

I’m at Gertrude’s Restaurant on North Charles Street in Baltimore with its owner, famed Chesapeake Bay chef and author, John Shields.  I’m here to talk about his newest book, The New Chesapeake Kitchen, which makes the case that we should all make our eating habits more sustainable.

He escorts me into his inner sanctum: the kitchen.

“These are the single fried oysters, right here,” Shields said, lifting a clear plastic container brimming with mollusks.  “So you see here, you have the shucked oysters, and you make a mixture of cornmeal and flower. You just shake off the excess, and then it goes right over there, into the deep fryer. No muss, no fuss!"

As the breaded morsels sizzle and brown in the roiling oil, it becomes obvious that when Shields says he’s making his meals more environmentally friendly, he’s not doing what some people might associate with the term: inflicting hardship and denial, perhaps by demanding that we only eat kale and tofu.

dominic lockyer/flickr

During this season of grilling, some of us think that the process stops the moment we take the food off the grill. But you can really do a lot more to put together a fantastic plate. And as the French say, "the sauce is everything." Listen for some sauce recipes.

OCEAN.SI.EDU

In the vast midwaters of the open ocean, there’s an animal so adorable that the Smithsonian Institution’s website said, "If this video doesn't inspire a whole cadre of budding teuthologists, we don't know what will." Any amateur teuthologists out there want to hazard a guess as to what group of animals they’re referring? Here’s a hint: teuthology is the study of squids and octopuses.

Raccoons

Aug 7, 2018
National Geographic

A few weeks ago, I was tucked snuggly into my bed, eyes closed, attempting mightily to fall asleep when a loud crash echoed from outside my home. I sat up quickly, listening for more clues about what the sound could have been. I heard nothing. I sighed, knowing that my already vain attempts at sleep were now well and truly dashed. I set my feet on the floor to investigate the noise.

When I arrived downstairs, I grabbed my flashlight and walked out my door. In the dark of the night, the bright light shone on what appeared to be many, many eyes. As my own eyes adjusted to the light, I could see four raccoons staring intently back at me from the area surrounding the trash can they had knocked over. 

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