On The Record | WYPR

On The Record

Weekdays, 9:30 to 10:00 am

Catch On the Record, hosted by Sheilah Kast, weekdays from 9:30 to 10:00 am, following NPR’s Morning Edition. We’ll discuss the issues that affect your life and bring you thoughtful and lively conversations with the people who shape those issues -- business people, public officials, scholars, artists, authors, and journalists who can take us inside the story. If you want to share a comment, question, or an idea for an interview you’d like to hear, email us at ontherecord@wypr.org.

Theme music created by Jon Ehrens.  Logo designed by Louis Umerlik.

Ways to Connect

Ann Froschauer / US Fish and Wildlife Service

Bats get a bad rap, but they play a pivotal role in nature---they devour insects and their furry bodies can spread pollen. Bats make up one fourth of all mammal species.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources ecologist Daniel Feller tells us about the devastation caused by the fungal disease White Nose Syndrome, which has killed millions of bats in North America. How is this disease spread?

Read more about White Nose Syndrome here:

DNR Bats and Diseases page
M
aryland's Bat Caves

And Dr. Kirsten Bohn, researcher at Johns Hopkins’ “Bat Communication Lab,” decodes the sounds bats make. You can hear more from Dr. Bohn at Bat Night! at Patapsco State Valley Park on April 21st. 

Pixabay MabelAmber/1928 Images

There’s a lot of evidence that social isolation hurts the elderly. Zach Leverenz, vice president of Impact Areas at the AARP Foundation, talks with us about a pilot program using voice-activated technology to combat loneliness for seniors. We also meet Lisa Budlow, vice president of aging in community at The Associated’s Comprehensive Housing Assistance, Inc. CHAI'S clients are testing out the technology, and Weinberg Woods resident Edith Yankelov, 87, talks about her experience taking part in the project.

Johns Hopkins University - Sheridan Library website

‘Devouring a book’ takes on new meaning at the International Edible Book Festivals taking place around town. We meet organizers Heidi Herr , a librarian at Johns Hopkins University and Aaron Blickenstaff, Access Services Manager at MICA’s Decker Library. 

You can learn more about MICA's Edible Book Festival here.

Johns Hopkins Edible Book Festival information is here.

Towson University Book Festival information is here.

Johns Hopkins University website

Johns Hopkins University's quest for authority to set up a police force of sworn, armed officers is getting the attention of civic leaders, students and neighbors. JHU president Ronald Daniels tells us why he considers it urgent and  Andrea Fraser, a Hopkins graduate student calls it premature. David Tedjeske, from the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators and director of public safety at Villanova University in Pennsylvana, weighs in on national campus security trends.

AP Photo by Wilfredo Lee

Since the Columbine school shooting 19 years ago, tens of thousands of other students have cringed in corners or cowered in closets during other shootings or drills. What traumas do they carry? How should parents talk to them? After the fatal shooting in St. Mary’s County, the Mental Health Association of Maryland posted talking points to help that communication. We hear about those talking points from Senior Program Officer Lea Ann Browning-McNee. We also hear from Loyola University Maryland clinical professor Gayle Cicero, of the School of Education, about the changing skills school counselors need.

You can find the link to MHAMD talking points for parents, here.

Jason Ramirez attended a new school almost every year of his childhood. Bouncing around from apartments to shelters to the homes of relatives because his parents - both addicted to heroin - could not give him and his sisters a stable home. But, once he set his sights on becoming a doctor, he was locked onto that dream.

Today Dr. Jason Ramirez is a family-medicine physician and faculty member at the University of Maryland medical school. In his memoir, “The Hard Way: A Doctor’s Fight Against Addiction, Poverty, and Depression". He explains how witnessing his parents’ drug use taught him to empathize with patients who struggle with addiction.

Carrie Wells / MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center

Between 10 and 20 percent of pregnancies end in a miscarriage. Yet, many families feel they have to grieve silently.

We hear from two women working to comfort families mourning a baby. Maria Mosca--who lost her daughter, Lucia May, last spring--tells us where she turned for support.

And nurse Terri Zeman, who started the perinatal bereavement program at MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center decades ago, tells us how the hospital helps families grieve the baby they didn’t get to take home.

marylandday.org

A knowledge of history leads to a better understanding of the present and, perhaps, insight into the future. Our guests today understand the power in that. We talk with Phoebe Stein, executive director of Maryland Humanities to learn about Maryland History Day, a statewide competition for middle- and high-school students to bring a favorite history lesson to life. And we also meet David Armenti, director of education at the Maryland Historical Society, who tells us why it’s worth our time to remember Maryland Day, this Sunday, March 25.

For information on Maryland Day events around the state, check out this link.

Interested in being a judge for Maryland History Day? Visit this link.

Here's a Stoop story from Hannah Feldman, about her encounters of the 'Merlin' kind. You can hear her story and others at stoopstorytelling.com or on the Stoop podcast.

Target

There are many ways to enjoy the great outdoors in Maryland … from mountains to ocean, and from forest to stream. Our guest today is dedicated to helping enthusiasts discover new adventures and learn more about the geography, flora and fauna that await. Biologist and naturalist Bryan MacKay walks us through his three new guidebooks: Cycle Maryland, Hike Maryland and Paddle Maryland. Whether you’re novice or seasoned, MacKay urges you to get out of the car and go into the wild.

Patrick Daniels

Baltimore City College, the third oldest public school in the country, is also home to a venerable debate team. Alumnus Gil Sandler, class of ‘41, describes how the art of debate has changed since his time on the team.

Cassie Doyle-Hines

There’s a revolution afoot, and it’s being fueled by high school students across the country who are discovering the power of political engagement. Galvanized by the tragedy in Parkville, Florida at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people dead last month, students across the country have staged rallies and walkouts demanding stricter gun laws and an end to gun violence. Saturday, March 24, is a focus of much of the organizing--the ‘March for Our Lives’ in Washington DC. Hundreds of thousands of young people and families from all parts of the US are expected -- demanding their voices be heard.

We talk with Park School of Baltimore Freshman Liza Sheehy, senior class president Mahey Gheis and Rommel Loria director of civic engagement and service learning about what students in their school are doing to engage politically.

We also meet Ericka Alston Buck, founder of Kids Safe Zone, who will travel to the march in D.C. with a fleet of buses full of high school students, organized by Mayor Catherine Pugh. Finally, we speak with Michaela Hoenig, a senior at Walter Johnson High School in Bethesda, who has organized lodging for hundreds of students and families attending the March For Our Lives.

To sign up for FREE bus rides to the rally from Baltimore, visit this link: Baltimore and Beyond March for Our Lives Rally Tickets.

WYPR

New cuts in federal income taxes would raise state taxes, unless the legislature takes action. We ask the vice chair of the Senate’s tax committee, Rich Madaleno, why the Senate voted to increase the standard deduction than every taxpayer can claim. 

Here’s a Stoop Story from Matt Hayat about finding his place in the deaf community.

You can hear his story and many others at stoopstorytelling.com, as well as the Stoop podcast.

Flour Power

Mar 16, 2018
Maryland Historical Society

The opportunity to tell one’s story can be empowering. Especially for those who think they don’t have a voice … or believe that others aren’t interested in what they have to say. We meet Johns Hopkins film student Amelia Voos along with illustrator and educator Jonathan Scott Fuqua ... they’ve been working with 8th-grade students at Morrell Park Middle School, to teach them the skills of telling their personal stories through video. Their films will be screened March 22 at the Jewish Museum of Maryland. More info here.

Baltimore Police Department

A crisis hotline, mobile teams that travel to residents in distress - just some of the services provided by the nonprofit Baltimore Crisis Response, Inc.

Executive director Edgar Wiggins describes how BCRI helps city residents living with mental illness or substance abuse. And how they train police to recognize the symptoms of mental illness and de-escalate stressful situations.

The 24-hour crisis hotline number is 410-433-5175.

Rales Center for the Integration of Health and Education

Inadequate health care--or NO health care--can keep a pupil chronically out of school. The Rales Health Center and wellness programs inside KIPP Academies in Baltimore are in place to help combat that scenario.  The initiative is sponsored by the The Ruth and Norman Rales Center for the Integration of Health and Education and Johns Hopkins University Medical School. We hear about the impact it has on the classroom from teacher Carina Wells, and medical director Dr. Kate Connor explains why the effort has such a big impact in the KIPP community.

Gunpowder Valley Conservancy

As spring approaches and the weather warms, it’s time to go outside and reconnect with nature.

Robert Cook, master gardener for the Baltimore City branch of the University of Maryland Extension shares tips on planning and planting year-round vegetable gardens. Info for the March 21st event on edible gardens here. More on soil testing here.

And Peggy Perry, of the nonprofit Gunpowder Valley Conservancy, tells us about volunteer efforts in Baltimore County to keep streams clear of trash and riverbeds strong. Info on the March 17th adopt-a-stream training here.

Rhoda Smith shares a story about pursuing her dream to attend college. You can hear other stories and the Stoop podcast here.

Tonight at 8pm, catch a live stoop show at the Baltimore Museum of Art. The theme is Intercambio: Stories about Inspiration and Exchange Across the Border.

Jackson Davis

In the early 20th century, Morgan State University--then, Morgan College--planned a move from its congested campus in West Baltimore to the verdant neighborhood of Lauraville.

Protests and lawsuits followed, as angry white residents opposed the arrival of African-American students and faculty.

Historian Steven Ragsdale takes us back to Morgan’s fight against segregation and its mission to built homes and businesses around the campus.

His talk will take place next Thursday, March 15th, 7:30 pm at the Village Learning Place, 2521 St. Paul St. in Baltimore. The event is organized by the Baltimore City Historical Society.

Lisa Nickerson/Kennedy Krieger Institute

When an adult has a stroke, signs and symptoms are often recognizable. But what if the victim is a toddler? Or an infant … someone who may not be able to sense or communicate that something is amiss? Pediatric stroke is more common than you think. We hear from Dr. Frank Pidcock, medical director of Kennedy Krieger Institute's ‘Constraint Induced Movement Therapy’ program. Then we visit Brooklynn, who suffered a stroke at the age of one and a half, and her mother, Nikki Wolcott at a therapy session. Original air date: 11/8/17

Meager education, a criminal record, gaps in employment - all can stand in the way of getting a good job.

Today we hear about two job training efforts in Baltimore: One at The Samaritan Women, a residential program for survivors of human trafficking, which launched a program for safe food-handling. Susan Schneider tells us about their foray into baking and we hear from resident, Eddie, who is marketing the treats.

The second, at the nonprofit The Lazarus Rite. Founder Christopher Ervin thinks Baltimore is uniquely situated to support careers in commercial driving. And graduate Kendall Bellamy describes his job driving for the city’s Department of Public Works.

Maryland Farmers Market Association

One in nine Marylanders depends on food stamps; half are children or senior citizens. The Trump administration is proposing deep cuts in food stamps, now called SNAP, for “supplemental nutrition assistance.” We ask chief external affairs officer Meg Kimmel and president and CEO Carmen del Guercio of  Maryland Food Bank about the likely impact if SNAP benefits shrink or become harder to qualify for. As that national debate heats up, farmers are calling for Maryland’s governor to put money into doubling the power of food stamps spent at farmers markets. Founder and executive director of the Maryland Farmers Market Association Amy Crone is leading that drive. We also hear from Sarah Steel, who uses SNAP to feed her family of four.

Read the Atlantic's explanation of the Trump administration's proposed bill here.

Find information about the SNAP program for Maryland Farmers Markets here.

Terradynamics Lab, JHU

Most people are repulsed by the sight of a cockroach … but we hear why Johns Hopkins researcher Sean Gart at the Terradynamics Lab finds inspiration in the creepy- crawlers … to inform robotic design. And we talk with Derek Paley, director of the Collective Dynamics and Control Laboratory at the University of Maryland-College Park. He examines the fluid movements of fish to improve underwater vehicle function and tells us why scientists look to nature for answers.

American Visionary Art Museum

The night sky is filled with billions of stars … we marvel at them, far off in the distance, suspended in space millions of light years away. And we're more connected to stars than we might think. That's the message of our guest,  astrophysicist Dr. Michelle Thaller. She's the Deputy Director of Science for Communications at NASA. She's also a presenter next Sunday, March 11, at the American Visionary Art Museum’s Logan Visionary Conference that focuses on ‘Two Views of Heaven: Spiritual and Scientific.’

Here’s a stoop story from astrophysicist and Nobel Prize winner Adam Riess, of Johns Hopkins and the Space Telescope Science Institute. He told his story at a tribute to Senator Barbara Mikulski, about her dedication to supporting scientific research. You can hear his story and others at stoopstorytelling.com or at the Stoop podcast.

For Christians, Lent is a time of fasting and penance, a reminder of Jesus’ time in the wilderness. What do wizards and elves have to do with Lent? Not much by themselves, but Michael Fischer tells us how the fantasy series ‘The Lord of the Rings’ offers a new way to think about mercy and fellowship. Check out his blog and reading schedule here.

Siyh / Flickr via Creative Commons

A new report by the nonprofit Job Opportunities Task Force dives deep into the ways the poor in Maryland are at greater risk of criminal charges or penalties. Caryn York, executive director of JOTF, says the poor face consequences that are blind to their ability to pay. We hear JOTF's recommendations for reform on issues ranging from bail to car insurance. 

Julek Plowy

Catholic Relief Services, whose humanitarian aid stretches across the globe, was founded to help to help the dispossessed after World War II. With a new podcast, CRS is highlighting some of the colorful characters and memorable events that make up its history. CRS producer and content creator, Rebekah Lemke and podcast host, Nikki Gamer, share stories and explain why Catholic Relief Services’ work is as necessary today as it was 75 years ago.

You can listen to the anniversary podcast here.

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