Midday | WYPR

Midday

Monday-Friday from noon-1:00, Tom Hall and his guests are talking about what’s on your mind, and what matters most to Marylanders:  the latest news, local and national politics, education and the environment, popular culture and the arts, sports and science, race and religion, movies and medicine.  We welcome your questions and comments. E-mail us at midday@wypr.org, tweet us: @MiddayWYPR, or call us at 410-662-8780.
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Meet the Midday team

Midday programs with Sheilah Kast as host ended on September 16, 2016

Archive prior to October 5, 2015

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The 2017 Maryland General Assembly opens for business on Wednesday.  During their annual 90-day legislative session, more than 180 lawmakers from across the state, in the Senate and the House of Delegates, will be drilling down into hundreds of pieces of legislation on issues affecting Marylanders in all walks of life – from business, schools and the environment, to transportation and criminal justice.  They’ll be wrestling with complex tax and budget challenges.  And the 2017 session promises what most recent General Assemblies have provided: pitched partisan battles between the Democratically – controlled legislature and Maryland’s Republican governor, Larry Hogan.  Today on Midday, two intrepid State House reporters join Tom for a closer look at some of the key legislative issues before the General Assembly, and predict where Maryland lawmakers and the Governor are likely to clash, and where they might also find agreement.

Erin Cox is The Baltimore Sun's State House bureau chief.   Rachel Baye covers the legislature for us here at WYPR.  They'll be with us for the full hour, and we'll also take your calls, emails and tweets.

Templeton Press

Unemployment is at its lowest in nearly 10 years. However,  almost one in eight men is out of the labor force entirely, neither working nor even looking for work. So who are these men and what’s keeping them out of the job market?

Today, a conversation with Nicholas Eberstadt and Anirban Basu about the historically high number of men in their prime working years who are not in the workforce.

Nicholas Eberstadt holds the Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). His latest book is Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis.

Anirbahn Basu is the Chairman and CEO of the Sage Policy Group, an economic consulting firm and host of the Morning Economic Report on WYPR. 

Today, members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences started voting on nominations for this year’s Academy Awards. Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post  and Jed Dietz of the Maryland Film Festival weigh-in on some of the late Oscar contenders.  Fences is a hit.  Silence is making a lot of noise, and Moonlight, which has already won several pre-Oscar awards, is re-opening in Baltimore at the Charles Theatre.

Mithun

Today, a conversation about State Center, the sprawling office complex in West Baltimore that stretches from Howard St. and Martin Luther King Blvd. in West Baltimore, across both sides of Eutaw St, and all the way north and west to Dolphin St. and Madison Ave.  State Center houses various state agencies. It was built more than 50 years ago, and people who work in and manage the buildings agree that they are in serious disrepair. They’ve agreed about that for a long time. Ten years ago, developers were asked by the administration of Gov. Bob Ehrlich to suggest a plan to upgrade and revitalize the state offices in a way that would also revitalize the surrounding West Baltimore neighborhoods. Gov. Ehrlich got the ball rolling and his successor, Gov. Martin O’Malley, kept it spinning, but it’s been rolling very slowly, and it has encountered more than a few bumps.  Twenty-six million dollars later -- after many public hearings and multiple approvals at various stages by various state agencies, the project is shovel-ready. The Hogan Administration, however, is apparently not ready. Why not?

Tom is joined in the studio today by Caroline Moore. She is CEO and founding partner of Ekistics LLC, the developer that has been working on the State Center project since 2006. John Kyle is here as well. He’s the President of the State Center Neighborhood Alliance, which represents the nine neighborhoods surrounding State Center and nearby institutions,  such as the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and the University of Maryland Medical Center. We’re also joined by Natalie Sherman, a reporter who covers real estate and economic development for the Baltimore Sun.  And Tom spoke earlier by phone with Doug Mayer, the Governor’s communications director, so you’ll also hear what the State has to say about the status of the project and the State’s apparent change of heart about proceeding with the plans.

Photo by Joan Marcus

Midday's theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck  joins Tom every Thursday with her reviews of local and regional stage productions. This week, it's the celebrated Fiasco Theater production that became a surprise hit in New York City: a minimalist re-invention of Stephen Sondheim's and James Lapine's classic Tony Award-winning musical-fantasy, Into the Woods, now on stage at the Kennedy Center.  

Into the Woods at the Kennedy Center runs through Sunday, January 8th.  Recommended for audiences ages 8 and up!

Photos courtesy Baltimore Sun; Johns Hopkins U

What’s the best way to turn around an under-performing school?  The Maryland State Board of Education appears ready to consider some strategies that are markedly different from past practices.  One of the ideas under consideration is the creation of a special district, or a series of special districts, that would include all of the schools with students who are not succeeding.  What does that mean for local control of schools?   How would that affect Governor Larry Hogan’s plan to expand vouchers for private schools, and what will the Trump Administration’s priorities be if his nominee for Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos, is confirmed?

Liz Bowie covers education for the Baltimore Sun.  Dr. David Steiner is the Executive Director of the Institute for Education Policy at Johns Hopkins University.  They join Tom for the full hour to talk about the changes ahead for Maryland schools, and they take your calls, emails and tweets.

Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parks

Jan 3, 2017
Photo courtesy Sheri Parks

Today, our monthly installment of Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parks. She's the Associate Dean for Research, Interdisciplinary Scholarship and Programming at the College of Arts and Humanities, and Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, at the University of Maryland/College Park.

So, it’s the new year.  How are you feeling?  Are you optimistic that brighter days lay ahead, or are you worried about where the world is going?  Does the election of Donald Trump mean that the country has embraced his notion that America used to be great, and needs to made great again?  Or does it mean that dissatisfaction with the status quo is so deep that we were willing to elect a Disrupter in Chief? 

And how closely tied is the fate of the country to your perception of what your own fate holds in store?  Are you optimistic about your own future?  The Dow Jones Industrial Average has risen 11,000 points in the last eight years.  Unemployment is the lowest it’s been in decades.  That’s fine, but survey after survey suggests that Americans think we’re not headed in the right direction.

Dr. Sheri Parks helps us sort it all out.  She's Tom's guest for the full hour, and she takes listeners' calls, emails and tweets.

Baltimore Link

Why doesn’t Baltimore have a first-rate public transit system? Why should a major US city have one subway line, rather than an entire subway system?  And why does that single subway line not connect with the light rail? Why does Baltimore have a Streetcar Museum, but no streetcars?

Access to public transit - or the lack of it - can seriously impact the prosperity of a city.  A study at Harvard identified poor transportation options as the number one obstacle for people trying to escape poverty.  In survey after survey, college kids’ biggest compliant about Baltimore is the lack of good public transit. The New Year brings with it a renewed optimism in the future of Baltimore’s public transit.

A group called Transit Choices is a coalition of businesses, community groups, and planners who are trying to coordinate a comprehensive overhaul of Baltimore’s transportation system.  Today, Jimmy Rouse of Transit Choices, and Klaus Philipsen, an urban planner and transportation expert, join Tom in the studio for a conversation about the future of Baltimore's public transit system.

*This conversation originally aired on September 21, 2016.

The "dirtiest man on TV" Mike Rowe joins Tom to talk about rolling up his sleeves and getting down to work in some of the hardest professions on Discovery Channel's Dirty Jobs and later Somebody’s Gotta Do It which aired on CNN from 2014 until May 2016.

These days Mike has turned his focus to closing the skills gap in workforce. The mikeroweWORKS Foundation. Provides scholarships for people who want to learn a high demand skill or trade. Mike says the desire to start the foundation came from meeting thousands of skilled workers who make good livings and are passionate about their careers. Many of the folks Mike shadowed on Dirty Jobs did not have advanced college degrees, he talks about why he's encouraging people to obtain a skill set in a specific vocation and why college isn't always the key to success. 

JAZZY STUDIOS, JUSTIN TSUCALAS, RASHEED AZIZ

*This conversation originally aired on October 6, 2016.

Forty years ago, Baltimore was a major manufacturing center. One third of the city’s workforce was employed in factories both large and small. Today, just 5% of Charm City’s workforce earns a living making things. That decline has played out in cities across the country. 

US manufacturing employment peaked in 1979, and it’s been declining ever since, down to just 9% of the national workforce today. Baltimore's manufacturing base has suffered, just like everywhere else in the nation, from cheap labor overseas, surging imports, new technologies and a changing business climate.

Today we look at the evolving state of manufacturing in Baltimore through the lens of three innovators who’ve been working in various ways to foster a flowering of small business manufacturing and artisan craftwork, such as textiles and furniture-making.  Will Holman is the General Manager of Open Works, the $11.5-million “makerspace” that opened September 19th in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District, near Greenmount Cemetery. He’s an architect by training, and also a furniture maker. Andy Cook is the founder of the "Made in Baltimore" campaign, a project of The Baltimore City Planning Department’s Office of Sustainability. "Made in Baltimore" is partnering with the Urban Manufacturing Alliance on a study to assess the State of Urban Manufacturing across the country. Baltimore will serve as one of the case study cities. Rasheed Aziz is here as well.  He launched the CityWide Youth Entrepreneurship Program in 2010 to work with teens in Baltimore's most distressed neighborhoods. They all join Tom in the studio.

Photo by Joan Marcus.

Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom every Thursday with her reviews of local and regional stage productions. This week, her spotlight is on the touring company production of  A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder, now in its final week at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore.

This romping musical tells the story of Monty Navarro, the cocky heir to a family fortune, who plots to eliminate all rivals for his inheritance, while he struggles to navigate his tangled romantic life and stay one step ahead of the law.  

The show stars John Rapson as the D’Ysquith heirs (eight of them in all!), Kevin Massey as Monty Navarro, Kristen Beth Williams as Sibella Hallward, Adrienne Eller as Phoebe D’Ysquith and Mary VanArsdel as Miss Shingle.

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder won four 2014 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Direction of a Musical (Darko Tresnjak), Book of a Musical (Robert L. Freedman) and Costume Design of a Musical (Linda Cho).

A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder continues at The Hippodrome Theatre through January 1, 2017. 

Photo courtesy Washington City Paper

Today, another edition of Healthwatch, our monthly series of conversations with Dr. Leana Wen, the Health Commissioner of Baltimore City.

This year, more than 300 people have been victims of homicides in Baltimore, but nearly that number died of opioid overdoses in just the first six months of 2016.  Congress has passed the 21st Century Cures Act, directing one billion dollars to target the national epidemic of opioid addiction and support new mental health research and treatment programs.  How will that affect local efforts to help people caught in the grips of drug dependency?  Dr. Wen -- the co-chair of a local group assembled to devise a comprehensive strategy, and a national leader in addressing this national dilemma -- discusses the outlook for curbing the opioid addiction epidemic.

Dr. Wen takes listener calls, tweets and emails during the conversation.

The segment concludes with Tom Hall's appreciation of some prominent Baltimoreans who passed on during 2016, whose contributions to the life of the city will be sorely missed. 

Photo by Kiirstn Pagan

Midday theater critic  J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom every Thursday with her reviews of local and regional stage productions.  This week, she's been to Everyman Theatre to see the Baltimore debut of the off-Broadway hit, playwright Colman Domingo's "Dot."

Domingo, whose other works include "Wild With Happy," and whose acting credits include a starring role in "Fear the Walking Dead," has written a touchingly comic play, set in the holiday season, about kinship, sanity, and the impact of Alzheimer's Disease on an African-American family in West Philadelphia.

Directed by Vincent M. Lancisi, "Dot" continues at Everyman Theatre through Sunday, January 8.

Photo courtesy Michael Schwartz

    Today, a conversation with one of America’s most celebrated comedians. Paula Poundstone has spent almost four decades blazing a unique trail in the world of standup, from improv clubs in Boston in the late 1970s to her 1992 gig as the first woman to emcee the White House Correspondents Dinner.  She’s been a regular on late night TV, won awards for her HBO comedy specials, and helped raised millions for the homeless with her standout performances at the Comic Relief concerts.  Many fans also know her from her regular appearances on NPR’s Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me, her voice-over roles in animated kids movies, and her off-beat essays.  Paula Poundstone joins us live from Los Angeles; we’ll talk about her career as a comedian, actress and author, and we’ll get her singular take on everything from politics, to parenting and the secrets of human happiness.

FX

It’s been an exciting year for actors of color on the big and small screens, we spend some time talking about the television hits and misses of 2016. The #OscarsSoWhite hashtag and controversy sparked a larger conversation about the lack of diversity in film and critical recognition when not a single actor of color was nominated for an Academy Award in 2015 or 2016. 

Photo courtesy ICJS

Today, another installment in our monthly series, Living Questions, in which we examine the role of religion in the public sphere.  We’re producing this series in partnership with the Institute for Islamic, Christian and Jewish Studies.

Following the riots and uprising in April of 2015, the ICJS embarked on a two-part project they called Imagining Justice in Baltimore.  The first part consisted of three lectures delivered earlier this year by Religious scholars from outside Baltimore.  Dr. Robert Franklin, from Emory University in Atlanta offered the Christian perspective.  Dr. Marc Gopin of George Mason University offered the Jewish perspective, and Dr. Najeeba Syeed of the Claremont School of Theology in California considered the notion of justice from the Muslim perspective.

photo by Rob Sivak

The Midday studio is filled this hour with the iconic sounds of Helicon, the Celtic-inspired trio of Robin Bullock, Chris Norman and Ken Kolodner. Their Annual Winter Solstice Reunion Concerts are one of Baltimore’s most beloved holiday traditions. Tomorrow these three world-class musicians reunite for their 31st Winter Solstice concert at Goucher College, playing Scottish, Irish, Appalachian and other world music.  But today, in keeping with our own tradition here at WYPR, they’re live in our studio – along with members of the roots music group Charm City Junction, including Ken's son Brad Kolodner, Patrick McAvinue, Alex Lacquement and Sean McComiskey.  These world class musicians are sure to warm your heart on this chilly day.  So, settle back and get ready to enjoy some musical magic!

The 3:30 performance of the Winter Solstice Concert is sold out.  For ticket information for the 7:30 performance, click here.

photo from Johns Hopkins University

Every scientific advancement comes with a slew of questions. Take autonomous cars, for example.   In an accident, whose lives should a driverless vehicle be programmed to protect?   Passengers in the car, or people on the street? The field of bioethics addresses the complicated ethical dilemmas that researchers and policy makers face in an ever-changing modern world.

Today, Tom is joined by Dr. Jeffrey Kahn, the director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. He stops by Midday from time to time to talk about how ethicists help us frame the questions we need to ask when we are confronted with new research possibilities, or new advances in science and technology.

photo by Richard Anderson

Theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins Tom in the studio with her weekly review of local stage productions. Today, she shares her impressions of  Les Liaisons Dangereuses, directed by Hana S. Sharif at Baltimore's Center Stage. The classic tale of love and betrayal, set in pre-Revolutionary France, was written in 1985 by Christopher Hampton as an adaptation of Pierre Choderlos de Laclos's 1782 epistolary novel. The production runs through Friday, December 23rd.

Today a conversation about homeless young people in Baltimore City. The Abell Foundation’s recent report “No Place to Call Home” found that there are 1,421 young people under the age of 25 who are homeless and without a parent or guardian to look after them. That figure is a lot higher than a previously accepted number based on the findings of a report conducted Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2011. Numbers in the Abell Foundation report were based on the findings of a Youth REACH MD study out of The Institute for Innovation and Implementation at the University of Maryland School of Social Work.

 There are only six homeless services providers that cater to the needs of youth. There are long wait lists to get into the programs and young people are often turned away.  So what’s being done to help these young people, and what are the barriers that keep them on the streets? 

Megan Lucy is a freelance journalist and the author of the Abell Foundation report. She joins from KUCI in Irvine, CA. 

photos courtesy Jacobson, Francis and Colton

Baltimore City residents are paying more for their water than ever before, as the city plans to spend $2 billion over the next six years upgrading its aging water system. This could have serious implications for citizens, especially low-income residents. This year alone, nearly 25,000 households are delinquent on their water bills.

Joining Tom in Studio A to discuss new strategies for making water more affordable in Baltimore is Joan Jacobson, a freelance journalist and the author of the new Abell Foundation report, “Keeping the Water On;”  and attorney Susan Francis, deputy director of Maryland Volunteer Lawyers Services, a group that provides legal assistance to low-income residents facing tax and water-bill  delinquencies.  Joining us by phone from Belmont, Massachusetts, is Roger Colton, a lawyer and economist at Fisher, Sheehan and Colton, with expertise in anti-poverty strategies; he has consulted on income-based utility-billing systems with cities around the country, including Philadelphia, which plans to launch one of the nation's first income-based water billing systems in 2017.   Midday invited Rudolph Chow, the director of Baltimore's Department of Public Works, to be on the show; his office declined the invitation, but sent us a written statement responding to the Abell Foundation report. Read the DPW statement by clicking here.

Center Stage

Today, a conversation about Center Stage. Maryland’s State Theater is undergoing a major facelift. The first phase of the renovation has been on display since Thanksgiving weekend, when previews for their current show, Les Liaisons Dangereuses opened in a spruced-up Pearlstone Theater. Center Stage hopes to complete their renovations in the next few months.  

How will the new space inform the programming at Center Stage and create opportunities for up-and-coming playwrights and actors?  Tom is joined by Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah OBE, the theater’s Associate Director, Gavin Witt and Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck. They’ll also discuss Center Stage’s new program “Wright Now, Play Later” that takes theater-making outside the building and into the community by bringing accomplished playwrights, patrons and performers together to turn an idea about a play into a spontaneous, lively performance executed in Baltimore’s local businesses and well-known public places. 

photos court. John Eisenberg, Mark Hyman

Today, Tom talks sports with Mark Hyman, an author, consultant and Assistant Teaching Professor of Sports Management at George Washington University, and John Eisenberg, a columnist for baltimoreravens.com.

The Army-Navy Game is back at M&T Bank Stadium tomorrow.  The Midshipmen are trying to make it 15 in a row.  And on Monday, the Ravens take on Tom Brady and the New England Patriots.  If Joe Flacco and the offense have the kind of day they had last week against Miami, the Ravens could score a big upset.   Mark Hyman and John Eisenberg join Tom in the studio to handicap the Army-Navy and NFL match-ups, and they discuss the NFL’s aggressive campaign to get children hooked on football, despite growing parental concerns about injury risks.  Plus, off-season moves by the Orioles, and how the new Major League Baseball collective bargaining agreement might affect the Birds.   

Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck interviews writer, actor, and director Colman Domingo.

Colman Domingo is best known for roles in Fear the Walking Dead, Lincoln, and Selma, ​but he has also acted on and off-Broadway and directed shows at The Lark,  The Geffen Playhouse, and Lincoln Center's Director's Lab. He is also an acclaimed playwright, and his play  Dot  is currently showing at Baltimore's Everyman Theatre. Dot will be playing at Everyman through Sunday, January 8th, 2017.

photo courtesy CNN

It’s been a little over a month since the U.S. presidential election. Republican Donald Trump’s surprise victory in the electoral college tally -- despite Democrat Hillary Clinton’s 2.7 million-popular-vote plurality -- is an outcome that continues to stir passions across the country.

Trump’s election-day win stunned his political opponents. Many worry that a Donald Trump presidency could pose new challenges to civil liberties in this country -- and even legitimize racial and ethnic intolerance.

Since the election, there has been a spike in hate crimes and incidents of bigotry in schools.  Many young people have expressed concerns about the uncertain future of our country. Many teachers and administrators have appealed to education scholars for help and guidance in teaching their students about the election, about its potential implications, and about ways students can express and act constructively on their concerns.

Today on Midday, Tom talks to three education scholars who have responded to this need for a post-election lesson planThey are currently working with K-to-12 and even college teachers around the country to compile what they’re calling the "Trump Syllabus K-12."  That syllabus will be introduced at the Baltimore Trump Teach-In tonight (12/08) at 7:00pm at Red Emma's Bookstore in Station North, here in Baltimore.  That event is co-sponsored by the Teachers Democracy Project and Towson University's Social Justice Collective.

Photo by Gary Emord Netzley

Midday theater critic J. Wynn Rousuck joins us today with her review of  A Christmas Story, The Musical -- a new rendition of the late author and radio-TV celebrity Jean Shepherd’s comic story of a childhood Christmas. Shepherd helped turn his story into a movie in 1983 -- he wrote the screenplay and narrated the film -- and it’s been a perennial holiday favorite ever since. Now it’s a musical, with book by Joseph Robinette and music and lyrics by Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. A Christmas Story - the Musical is on stage at the Hippodrome through this Sunday, December 11.

University of Illinois Press

Today on Midday, an exploration of one of America’s greatest songwriters: Cole Porter. From songs like Night and Day to shows like Kiss Me Kate, Porter defined sophistication and elegance, and influenced generations of songwriters.

Baltimorecity.gov

Today, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake stepped down from office after serving as Baltimore's mayor for six years. Rawlings-Blake -- who previously held the position of City Council President -- assumed office after former mayor Sheila Dixon was forced to resign after pleading guilty to misappropriation of funds. Rawlings-Blake was elected again in 2011, in 2015 she announced she would not seek re-election.

Rawlings-Blake’s tenure was marked by notable achievements but also fraught with controversy. Nationally, the Mayor may be remembered for her response during the 2015 Uprising following the death of Freddie Gray -- she was criticized for not stopping the “riots” quickly enough and for referring to “rioters” as thugs.” But she will also be remembered for attracting businesses like Amazon to the area, overseeing the $5.5B Port Covington development deal, and launching major initiatives to address the city's aging infrastructure.

 

Three astute political observers who have followed Rawlings-Blake's term in office join Tom in the studio today to help us assess the former mayor's impact on Baltimore and the legacy she leaves as newly-inaugurated Mayor Catherine Pugh takes office:

 

Andrew Green is the opinion editor for the Baltimore Sun. He was the city/state editor before coming to the editorial board, and prior to that he covered the State House and Baltimore County government.

 

Jean Marbella is a reporter on the Baltimore Sun’s investigative and enterprise team. She joined The Sun in 1987 and has been a health reporter, a feature writer, a national correspondent, an editor and a metro columnist.

Bishop Douglas Miles, with Koinonia Baptist Church, is co-chair emeritus of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD), and one of the city's leading community and civil rights activists.

Apprentice House Press

Tom’s guests today are two social justice activists who have lived and worked among some of Baltimore‘s poorest and most disadvantaged people for nearly 50 years. 

Brendan Walsh was a seminarian from The Bronx, and Willa Bickham was a nun from Chicago before they changed course, married each other, and started feeding and housing the poor -- in Baltimore. Bickham and Walsh were married in 1967 and in October of the following year, they opened Viva House in Southwest Baltimore (or Sowebo, to city residents). Since then, they estimate that more than a million people have come to them asking for help: shelter, food, financial assistance, or maybe just a little TLC.

Viva House is part of a network of places around the country that are part of the Catholic Worker Movement. Viva House serves two meals per week to about 200 people from the neighborhood and elsewhere; they give away hundreds of bags of donated groceries every month; and they agitate for non-violence. In their new book, Brendan Walsh writes: “Long ago, our society lost a fundamental understanding of the common good and the necessity for human solidarity.” Brendan Walsh and Willa Bickham have stood in solidarity with their neighbors in Sowebo, their fellow anti-war activists around the world, and the notion that the common good is worth standing for, worth fighting for, and worth bearing witness to. Their book is called The Long Loneliness in Baltimore; Stories Along the Way. Walsh and Bickham will be reading from their book at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Jan. 24. For details about their reading, click here.  If you would like to volunteer or donate food for Viva House, or to buy the book, "The Long Loneliness in Baltimore," please call  Viva House at 410-233-0488. 

Baltimore is once again on track to reach a horrid and unacceptable milestone:  300 murders in one year.  As of today, 295 people have been the victims of a homicide in our city.  Plus, 620 people have been victims of non-fatal shootings.  Every Sunday, at Memorial Episcopal Church in Bolton Hill, they read the names and pray for the people who have died from violence in Baltimore during the previous week.  It may also be the case that other churches and houses of worship do this too, but Memorial is the only one we know of directly. 

Beginning today, we are going to read those names as well, every Monday, on Midday.  We will stand in witness to their untimely deaths, and we will remember their families and friends in their hour of grief.  A researcher named Ellen Worthing has been compiling a list of Baltimore homicide victims for the past 15 years.  We are indebted to her for the data she posts on her blog, chamspage.  See her blog here. We also consult the Baltimore Sun’s list of homicides, which they have been compiling since 2007. 

From the Saturday after Thanksgiving, through last Friday, the following people lost their lives to violence in Baltimore City:  Jacob Hayes, age 22, Charles McGee, age 23. Dwayne Dorsey, age 27, Davon Dozier, age 29, Troy Smothers, age 23, Jamal Stewart, age 18, plus an unidentified man who was 73 years old. 

IMDb

‘Tis the season to spread tidings of comfort and joy. If the cold weather – or the election – leave you craving comfort, we’ve got a few Comfort Movies to suggest on the Midday Monthly Movie Mayhem.

Our Movie Mavens, Ann Hornaday, chief film critic of The Washington Post and Jed Dietz, founder and executive director of the Maryland Film Festival, join Tom in Studio A to discuss the end of the year releases that tug hard at the heart strings.

From the out-of-this-world Arrival; to Loving, the profoundly moving story of interracial couple Richard and Mildred Loving who married in 1958 in segregated Virginia; to the visually stunning documentary The Eagle Huntress; Hornaday and Dietz weigh in on which year-end flicks – and which Yuletide films – shouldn’t be missed. If you’re wondering what to see this weekend, look no further.

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