Cardin Tells Council Baltimore County Being Hurt By Government Shutdown | WYPR

Cardin Tells Council Baltimore County Being Hurt By Government Shutdown

Jan 8, 2019

U.S. Senator Ben Cardin (third from left) with the Baltimore County Council
Credit John Lee

  

The social security office in Baltimore County is up and running during the partial government shutdown, but U.S. Senator Ben Cardin said the county is still feeling the effects of the stalemate going on the Washington, D.C. 

 

Cardin met with the county council Monday, and discussed the shutdown, as well as how Baltimore City’s problem with crime is becoming the county’s problem as well.

 

 

Cardin told the council the partial shutdown is having a major impact on the county, which is home to a number of government workers and contractors. 

 

Cardin said, “Legislation passed the Senate, it’s not enacted yet, that makes sure that the furloughed and those working without pay are paid once government is reopened, and I think we’ll get that done.”

 

But Sixth District Councilwoman Cathy Bevins told Cardin, “That doesn’t buy groceries now.” 

 

Cardin, a Democrat, placed blame for the partial shutdown squarely President Trump. 

 

Cardin also brought up the ongoing saga of Baltimore City not being able to land a police commissioner. Fort Worth Police Chief Joel Fitzgerald, Mayor Catherine Pugh’s pick to be the city’s top cop, withdrew from consideration Monday. 

 

Republican Councilman Todd Crandell, who represents the Dundalk area, told the senator the city’s crime problems are bleeding into the county and that some of his constituents no longer go into the city, even for a Ravens or Orioles game.

 

Cardin agreed that public perception of the city being unsafe is detrimental to its economic future.

 

“People are comparing Baltimore to some of the worst periods of history of bad, urban security issues and it’s affecting us,” Cardin said.

 

Cardin said he and his wife often walk through city neighborhoods and they feel perfectly safe.