Jamyla Krempel | WYPR

Jamyla Krempel

Digital Producer

Jamyla came to us from Delmarva Public Radio, where she was a reporter and local host for All Things Considered.  Thanks to funding from local foundations and members of the WYPR Board of Directors, she's helping us produce "The Lines Between Us." At Delmarva Public Radio, Jamyla was awarded "2011 Best News Series" by the Chesapeake Associated Press Broadcasters Association for her look at racial inequality in Somerset County’s government, and she's covered redistricting, same-sex marriage, and the depictions of minorities on television.  She also led an NPR-guided revamp of the Delmarva Public Radio website.

Ways to Connect

U.S. Department of Education

Guest host Jamyla Krempel sits in for Tom Hall today for a conversation about sexual education. In the era of the “Me Too” movement – with its steady stream of stories about actors, politicians, clergy, executives, people in virtually every profession being accused of sexual assault, is sex ed teaching students about how power can be used to hurt others, and about the importance of consent? Have schools updated their curricula to reflect students’ gender identity and sexual orientation?

Shan Wallace/ @sisterswithstories Instagram

On today's Life in the Balance, we focus on Black women: their experiences, their concerns, and their contributions to our country and to Baltimore.

Black women have faced racial and gender discrimination, violence, and economic and political disenfranchisement for hundreds of years. 

But, like the generations of women that have come before them, Black women are continuing to rise above the challenges. Here in Baltimore, a majority-minority city – when we talk about issues facing the City and its residents, how often do we hear discussions that center around Black women?

Guest host Jamyla Krempel and four local activists and educators add to the conversation in this episode. 

 

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Five deaths have been confirmed and multiple people have been injured in a Thursday shooting at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis. WYPR News Director Joel McCord has been at the scene and spoke with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish this afternoon.

WYPR Primary Election 2018 Coverage

Jun 26, 2018
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Get election coverage from the WYPR News team, On the Record and Midday. 

You can watch WYPR's live election coverage "Primary Night in Maryland" in this Facebook Live video.   

Go to the Maryland Board of Elections for the latest election results

This post will be updated. 

The Chesapeake Associated Press Broadcasters Association (CAPBA) honored WYPR with two awards at its annual ceremony on Saturday. WYPR reporter John Lee won for Outstanding Editorial or Commentary for "One Virginian's Take on Confederate Monuments" and Outstanding Feature or Human Interest Story for "Farms That Go ‘Boom’ Annoying Neighbors in Baltimore County." 

Midday host Tom Hall was recognized as a finalist for Outstanding Talk Show for "Freddie Gray, Two Years On: Baltimore Community Perspectives” and reporter Rachel Baye was a finalist for Outstanding Enterprise Reporting for "Maryland Poor Get Little Help on Child Care." 

Rachel Baye

The Maryland General Assembly ended on Monday night after legislators waded through more than 2,500 bills in the 90-day session. 

Here are some of the most notable bills to pass in the session, along with links to the legislation and WYPR's coverage. 

Like the Grand Canyon/Flickr Creative Commons

WYPR producer Jamyla Krempel hosts today’s show.

There’s been lots of talk lately about changing the narrative in Baltimore. Last month, Mayor Catherine Pugh told an audience at the Parkway Theatre that Baltimore had a “perception problem.” She also said she wanted to “work on the media not depicting Baltimore always as this negative place to be.” The Mayor’s statements got many people, including Jamyla, thinking about how Baltimore is perceived.

For the first half of the show, Jamyla welcomes two journalists who’ve spent a lot of time thinking and writing about the city. Lawrence Lanahan is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared in Al Jazeera, Columbia Journalism Review and other outlets. He was the creator of WYPR’s The Lines Between Us series. And he was senior producer of the WYPR show “Maryland Morning.” Lisa Snowden McCray is a longtime Baltimore journalist. She was a writer and associate editor for the Baltimore City Paper and then editor-in-chief of The Baltimore Beat, a weekly alternative paper which, sadly, ceased publication yesterday. 

Later in the show, Jamyla welcomes Al Hutchinson, the president and CEO of Visit Baltimore, and Annie Milli, the executive director of Live Baltimore to talk about Baltimore’s narrative going forward.

It’s Tube Talk on Midday. Nostalgia seems to be in on the small screen. Remakes of One Day at a Time and She’s Gotta Have It on Netflix are gaining popularity with younger audiences. But do television reboots and remakes, really work? Plus, which shows are sidelined, and which ones are continuing in the wake of the sexual misconduct scandal rocking Hollywood? And, black actors make up 20 percent of TV series regulars, so why are fewer than 5 percent of TV writers, black?   

Bridget Armstrong is a producer for Midday. Jamyla Krempel is a digital producer for WYPR. They join Tom to discuss the television highs and lows of 2017. 

DOMINIQUE MARIA BONESSI

The Baltimore City Police Department trial board found Lieutenant Brian Rice not guilty on all charges on Friday. The trial began on November 14. Rice was the commanding officer on duty in the Western District on April 12, 2015, the day Freddie Gray was taken into police custody. 

WYPR reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi reported on the trial.

AP PHOTO/JOSE LUIS MAGANA, FILE

Officer Caesar Goodson, the van driver in the Freddie Gray case, has been facing a police trial board all week. Prosecutors have argued that Goodson’s failure to follow proper police procedure led to Gray’s death in April 2015 from a spinal cord injury suffered in the back of the van.

Gray was placed shackled and handcuffed in the back of the van. Prosecutors have said the lack of a seatbelt and Goodson's  failure to respond to Gray’s requests for medical treatment violated policy and led to Gray’s death.

The number of people in Maryland who died after taking the narcotic Fentanyl increased by more than 70 percent in the first half of 2017, compared with the first half of last year, according to preliminary data the state Department of Health released Tuesday. 

Deaths related to heroin and prescription opioids were relatively flat across the state, the data show.

Whether you're running or watching the Baltimore Running Festival this weekend, you might want to put your feet up and read a book. Check out these recent book-related interviews on "The Weekly Reader" , "Midday" and "On the Record." 

On this edition of "The Weekly Reader," we feature two novels that capture the unique physical and emotional landscape of 'The Big Easy,' Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s "A Kind of Freedom" and C. Morgan's "The Floating World." 

Matthias Ripp/flickr

The month-long warning phase for red light cameras has begun. After 30 days, if you get caught running a red light, you'll get a $75 ticket. 

The warning phase for Baltimore City’s speed cameras is over, which means if one of those cameras catches you speeding, you’ll get a $40 ticket.

Click on the image for the current Baltimore City Department of Transportation map of red light and speed cameras.

Television Academy

The Emmy nominations are in. Saturday Night Live and HBO’s Westworld racked up 22 nominations a piece, while other popular newcomers like HBO’s Insecure were left off the list. With so many high quality options for viewers on television and on streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, are we entering a golden age of television?  The Emmy awards will air in September, today Bridget Armstrong, sitting in for Tom Hall, dishes about the television hits and misses of the season with her TV-talking partner, WYPR digital producer Jamyla Krempel

Radha Blank also joins the conversation. She’s a playwright, performer and screenwriter. She's written for Empire on Fox, Netflix’s The Get Down and most recently she worked as a writer and co-producer for Spike Lee’s latest series She's Gotta Have It which premieres on Netflix this Thanksgiving.

Google Maps

Speed cameras are back in Baltimore. An earlier system was shut down in 2013 after it was discovered cameras were issuing speeding tickets to cars that weren’t violating the speed limit. Mayor Catherine Pugh announced the implementation of the new cameras in May and said that she hoped the new camera system would renew Baltimoreans’ confidence and bring revenue to the city.

Below is a map showing where the first seven cameras are. They're all in school zones.

The "More than Words" Podcast

Jun 28, 2017

We've compiled all 7 episodes of More than Words, a series reported and produced by students at Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. Click on the image for information about each episode. 

Louis Umerlik

Last week you heard from Deneira, a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. She shared a little bit about her life with her mom and grandmother. Now she’ll give us some insight into her senior year. Deneira says she’s “not the normal teenager.” Who knows if such a thing exists, but those familiar with Deneira will tell you that she is an intelligent, resilient and unique young adult. In her last piece for More than Words, you’ll hear some phone conversations Deneira had with her sister about how they cope with anxiety and depression. More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

Last week you heard from Deneira, a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore. She shared a little bit about her life with her mom and grandmother. Now she’ll give us some insight into her senior year. A month or so ago, Deneira told me she’s “not the normal teenager.” Who knows if such a thing exists, but those familiar with Deneira will tell you that she is an intelligent, resilient and unique young adult.  

In her last piece for More than Words, you’ll hear some phone conversations she had with her sister about how they cope with anxiety and depression. 

More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

Aranami/flickr

The U.S. economy remains the largest in the world and consumer spending supports two-thirds of all activity. You might remember that after the 9/11 attacks, consumers were urged to come to the economy’s rescue by spending more aggressively. And as pointed out by a recent Barron’s article, these ought to be boom times for U.S.consumers. 


Louis Umerlik

In today's episode of More than Words, we’ll focus on women who sacrifice and provide for their families. Deneira is a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She walked across the stage last week. She lives with her mom, grandma and several pets.

In today's episode of More than Words, we’ll focus on women who sacrifice and provide for their families. Deneira is a graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. She walked across the stage last week. She lives with her mom, grandma and several pets. 

These three generations of women have faced many struggles, some of which are ongoing. Deneira will tell you about some of her challenges next week, but first she wanted to share a piece about the women in her life who exemplify perseverance and strength. 

More Than Words is supported by a generous grant from the Philip and Beryl Sachs Family Foundation.

Better Bridges

Jun 5, 2017
melissaclark/flickr

One of our standard national narratives is that America’s infrastructure is collapsing. Our pipes leak, our water is polluted, our bridges obsolete, and our airports prehistoric. What is less often heard are some of the improvements being made to infrastructure. For instance, as indicated by writer David Harrison, America’s bridges are actually getting sounder.  

Anirban has more.


"More than Words" Season 1 Podcast

May 25, 2017

First up-Deneira moderated a discussion with her co-reporters about adults’ perceptions of youth. The students had an honest and lively discussion about their experiences being stereotyped and how they feel adults could be more understanding and helpful to young people.

6:55-Xavier shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

12:48-Chanel produced and narrated a radio diary about her identity as a gender non-conformist.  Chanel, who also goes by Cory, is committed to dispelling stereotypes about gender identity and expression.

23:40-Miles takes us on a journey through his experience of mentorship.

In today's episode of "More Than Words," Xavier, a Frederick Douglass High School student shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

In today's episode of "More Than Words," Xavier, a Frederick Douglass High School student shares his connection to an issue all too common in Baltimore City--gun violence.

SNL

WYPR producers Bridget Armstrong and Jamyla Krempel join Tom for Tube Talk. Shows like Saturday Night Live, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert are tackling President Trump and his administration one episode at a time. We'll talk about how the presidency is informing television. 

And, BET's New Edition biopic, which chronicles the ups and downs of the R&B boy band, is the highest rated program the network has aired in five years. We'll talk about what made the film successful and other shows on the horizon.

Today we premiere a new series that will air on On the Record every Tuesday in February. More Than Words is a collaborative youth media group, radio project and podcast produced and reported by Baltimore City Public School students. The show hands over the microphone to youth so they can report and tell personal stories they feel journalists sometimes neglect or get wrong. 

Episode #1: How Adults View Youth

Feb 7, 2017

Deneira moderated a discussion with her co-reporters about adults’ perceptions of youth. The students had an honest and lively discussion about their experiences being stereotyped and how they feel adults could be more understanding and helpful to young people.


kayewisewhitehead.com

In this Public Commentary, Dr. Karsonya 'Kaye' Wise Whitehead wrestles with the question "How does it feel as a black person in America to be seen by the world as a problem?"

FX

It’s been an exciting year for actors of color on the big and small screens, we spend some time talking about the television hits and misses of 2016. The #OscarsSoWhite hashtag and controversy sparked a larger conversation about the lack of diversity in film and critical recognition when not a single actor of color was nominated for an Academy Award in 2015 or 2016. 

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