Dominique Maria Bonessi | WYPR

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Reporter

Before working in Baltimore, Dominique was a freelance reporter with WAMU and other international outlets in Washington D.C.  In 2016, Dominique was a reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists to go to Turkey and cover lack of mental healthcare and educational resources for Syrian children and their families.  Her stories from Turkey appeared in The Atlantic, USA Today, US News & World Report, PRI’s The World, TRT World, and NPR.  She graduated cum laude from the George Washington University with a double B.A. in Journalism & Mass Communications and Arabic Language & Culture. As an Arabic and Spanish speaking Cuban-American, Dominique loves to document people’s stories no matter what language they speak.

Ways to Connect

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

It’s afternoon rush hour on a Friday in the parking lot of Columbia’s Dobbin Center.

Jonathan Hernandez and his Casa in Action canvassing team are starting their shift.

It’s one of two teams working Howard and Anne Arundel counties.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

In February, Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh said she would not release an audit of the police department’s overtime claims because it was part of the evidence in a police union suit against the city. But now, the mayor has changed her mind.

Mayor Catherine Pugh announced Wednesday that she will name a new Baltimore Police Commissioner by the end of the month. The announcement comes among talk of new changes to the department and training efforts.

BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport

Contract employees at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, along with the nation’s largest service workers’ union, called Tuesday afternoon for higher wages and improved health insurance benefits for those workers. This was all part of demonstrations at 11 airports around the country.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

After two city police officers were involved in a shooting more than a week ago and the number of homicides jumped last month, the Baltimore Police Department is going on high alert for three days.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh promised during her campaign to put $20 million a year by 2023 into a trust fund to pay for tearing down abandoned housing, creating affordable housing and subsidizing rentals for low income city residents. But critics at a well-attended City Council committee hearing Thursday sharply questioned whether the city would be able to fully fund what the mayor calls an “affordable housing trust fund.” Morning Edition Host Nathan Sterner talks with Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi to iron out these concerns.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

  

Staffers in Mayor Catherine Pugh’s office have not been adhering to the Department of Finance’s policies for using city credit cards, according to an audit released Wednesday by the city auditor.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

 

Karen Holliday says she has something in common with Billie Holiday, Baltimore’s famous jazz singer who died in July 1959 from illness related to drug and alcohol abuse, beside the last name.

“Drugs have always been in this family of mine,” says Holliday. “I was the person who slept right there in the park across the street from the War Memorial. I was also a person that used there.”

AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Snochia Moseley, the woman who shot six people at a Rite Aid distribution center in Harford County Thursday, had been diagnosed with a mental disorder two years ago, according to the county sheriff.

Sheriff Jeff Gahler said Moseley, 26, was diagnosed with a mental illness in 2016, but was able to purchase a 9-mm Glock 17 handgun legally last March.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Federal prosecutors in Maryland indicted three men today on charges of bilking more than 400 investors of $364 million in an elaborate Ponzi scheme. The victims were small business owners, professional athletes, doctors and lawyers in Maryland and throughout the nation.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

The Baltimore City Council was back in session Monday evening with a long list of new legislation. Morning Edition's Host Nathan Sterner speaks with Reporter Dominique Maria Bonessi about what happened.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

The Filbert Street Garden sits just inside the city line in south Baltimore’s Brooklyn neighborhood. Among the ducks and chickens that call the garden home, there are flower beds, a greenhouse, bee hives, and—tucked away in the far back corner—the composting bins.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Baltimore City’s Liquor Board Waverly Tavern’s liquor license for a week and fined the establishment $2,500 Thursday afternoon.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Second of two parts

Shekhar Karki has owned Waverly Tavern, a bar and liquor store in north Baltimore, for four years.

“It’s a good business,” he says. “That is what I thought before starting.”

A. Currell / Flickr / Creative Commons

First of two parts

Residents of at least 10 Baltimore communities say a proliferation of bars and liquor stores has led to an increase in crime in their neighborhoods and they want the city’s board of liquor license commissioners to do something about it.

But liquor board members say there isn’t much they can do because of state law, which frustrates folks like Marvin “Doc” Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Community Association.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Six-year-old Emily shows off the colors in her sidewalk drawing.

“Pink! Yellow!” Emily exclaims. “Blue, purple, pink!”

Her rainbow tie-dye dress matches the piles of chalk at her feet. Her bangs stick to her forehead on this muggy August evening.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

When police found Detective Sean Suiter shot dead in Harlem Park last November, they cordoned off the neighborhood as they searched for the shooter. Residents had to show ID to get in or out.

EA Sports Gaming

Authorities have identified David Katz as the gunman that killed two people and injured 11 others before taking his own life at a video game tournament in Jacksonville, Florida, Sunday afternoon. The 24-year-old was a Maryland resident.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Most of the restaurants in Baltimore City are operating without annual health department inspections; there just aren’t enough inspectors to go around. That’ s according to an audit released Wednesday morning at the Board of Estimates meeting.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Jarrod Ramos, the man accused in the Capital Gazette shootings, appeared in court Monday for the first time since his arrest in June.

He sat slumped over in his chair at the defense table during the morning hearing wearing dark green hospital scrubs, socks and prison shower sandals and had shackles around his ankles. He only spoke in a whisper to his lawyer, William Davis.

Baltimore City Office of the Mayor

Some Baltimore City Council members want fewer police patrolling around Johns Hopkins University and Hospital. But Mayor Catherine Pugh rejected the idea at her Wednesday news conference.

“First of all Hopkins does not exist on an island," she said. "It’s not 20 miles outside of Baltimore.”

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Baltimore has abandoned its troubled BikeShare program in favor of electric scooters and bikes. The city is launching a six-month pilot program with the scooters while shutting down the problem plagued BikeShare program after less than two years.

Mayor Catherine Pugh announced the move Wednesday calling it the "wave of the future" in transportation.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Earlier in the day, Interim Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle said he was “disappointed” and “disturbed” by the video of Officer Arthur Williams striking civilian Dashawn McGrier in the head. Then Mayor Catherine Pugh tweeted she was demanding “answers and accountability.”

Monday night, City Council president Jack Young said the incident “causes great concern with the community when we’re trying to rebuild police-community relations.”

“It’s like the officer just lost it,” he said in the monthly meeting of the council’s Public Safety and Budget committees with the police department. “But this is the type of behavior that we can’t have.”

AP

Interim Baltimore Police Commissioner Gary Tuggle said Monday he was “disappointed” and “disturbed” by the viral video of one of his officers beating up a civilian Saturday on Monument Street.

It pointed out, he said, “another deficiency in our training that we can actually learn from.”

Baltimore’s law expanding inspection requirements to one and two family units went into effect the first of this month and housing advocates say they want to make sure renters know about the new law and continue to push for an increase in housing inspections.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Last month, an audit found that Youth Works, Baltimore’s summer youth jobs program for roughly 8,000 young people, was riddled with problems and in danger of losing state funds. Now, two city councilmen are trying to provide more support for young adults in those programs.

Council members, Zeke Cohen, who represents an East Baltimore district, and Kristerfer Burnett, whose district touches the western border of the city, are looking to expand “This is Working,” a program under the Youth Works umbrella.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

Three boats sank at the Chester Cove Marina, between Fells Point and Canton, almost a year ago and they’re still there, on the bottom, potentially polluting the surrounding water and annoying neighbors. And it's unclear whether anyone is doing anything about it.

Dominique Maria Bonessi

The Baltimore Police Department is calling for an internal investigation of officers who apparently ignored reports of an armed man who ditched a gun. The video footage of the incident was recorded on a city firefighter’s dash camera.

BEN SPIER

While the nation's attention has been focused on the separation of children from their parents at the US-Mexico border, there’s another problem in Baltimore that could lead to the same fate.

Undocumented immigrants are having a hard time getting food assistance benefits for their US-born children. And the parents are afraid to fight back for fear of deportation and potentially separation from their children.

Photo courtesy Baltimore Sun

Baltimore’s summer youth jobs program is riddled with problems. That’s according to an audit presented to the Board of Estimates this morning. Acting City Auditor Audrey Askew says it puts the program at risk of losing state funding.

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