Cianna B. Greaves | WYPR

Cianna B. Greaves

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AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

On today’s News Wrap:  Tronc, Inc., the controversial Chicago based media company that owns several newspapers around the country including the Baltimore Sun and The Daily News, is once again making headlines.  This week Tronc made dramatic cuts to the news room at The NY Daily News, laying off over 90 employees.  Politico media reporter, Jason Schwartz is on the line from Arlington, Va. to discuss the implications of those cuts on local journalism in New York City and around the country. 

Later on in the program, AP White House reporter, Darlene Superville speaks with us about some of the big stories in a week that has seen yet another tsunami of headlines from the White House, and various investigations about the Trump administration that are on-going. 

Photo Courtesy Kimberly Reed

Tom's guest is director Kimberly Reed, whose new documentary, Dark Money, chronicles the insidious effects of political donors, both corporate and individual, who go to great lengths to keep their identities hidden. As the documentary shows, the corrosive impact of this well-financed political advocacy is on full display in state houses across the country, in the halls of Congress, in the courts, and in the executive branch of government. 

The documentary is showing at a number of theaters in the region. In Baltimore, it begins a run Friday night at the Parkway.

Photo by Ron Aira, Creative Services GMU

(A Midday re-broadcast: originally aired June 19, 2018)

Tom’s guest is General Michael Hayden.  In more than 40 years in the Air Force and the Intelligence Community, the retired four-star general served as Director of the National Security Agency from 1999-2005, during the George W. Bush Administration.  He also served for about a year as the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence, and in 2006, he became the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, until President Obama appointed Leon Panetta to that position in 2009.  

The thesis of General Hayden’s latest book is disconcerting and frightening.  Given President Trump’s proclivity to lie about what he knows to be true, and the danger that there are things he should know to be true, but doesn’t, Michael Hayden paints a picture of an intelligence community at risk, whose efficacy is directly affected by the President’s refusal to acknowledge facts, and his harsh and undisciplined rhetoric. 

It has been a little more than three years since the city of Baltimore was convulsed with violence following the funeral of Freddie Gray, who died in police custody on April 19, 2015.  After the National Guard went back to their barracks, after the fire at the CVS Drugstore at the corner of Penn and North was extinguished, and after the curfews were lifted, there was a frenzy of finger pointing as to how the city responded to the crisis.  The Mayor at the time, Stephanie Rawlings Blake, would decide a few months later not to seek re-election.  A new police chief was appointed, and political leaders at the state and local levels promised decisive action to address the underlying problems of poverty and inequality that were seen as the root causes of the unrest.  The business community and numerous non-profits pledged to redouble their efforts to help lift neighborhoods like Sandtown Winchester out of its economic and social morass.

So, what, if anything, has changed since 2015?

Today, a conversation about a book by Sean Yoes, a highly respected Baltimore journalist, who chronicles what happened in the turbulent weeks following Freddie Gray’s death, and the three years which followed.  Sean Yoes is a good friend of this program.  He is the Baltimore Editor of the Afro American Newspaper, and co-host of Truth and Reconciliation, a podcast that we are proud to have as part of WYPR’s Podcast Central.  For several years, Sean hosted a show on WEAA Radio, and he even served as a producer of Midday back in the day, when our show was hosted by Dan Rodricks.

His new book is a collection of selected essays that he has published in the Afro during the last three years.  It’s called Baltimore After Freddie Gray: Real Stories from One of America’s Great Imperiled Cities.

Midday News Wrap 7.13.18

Jul 13, 2018
Photo courtesy AP News

It’s the Midday Newswrap.  Today, a look at some of the big stories of the week on the international, national and local scenes.

With the showmanship that usually attends a reality TV show, former reality TV star Donald Trump announced his latest nomination to the Supreme Court.  Federal Circuit Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh is the President’s second pick for the highest court in the land, and it is quite possible that it won’t be his last.  Kristen Clarke joins Tom on the line from Washington, D.C.  She’s the president and executive director of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

Then Philip Bump, a National Correspondent for the Washington Postjoins the program to assess President Trump’s trip to the NATO Meeting, his talks with Prime Minister Theresa May of Great Britain, and his upcoming get-together with Vladimir Putin.

Tom also talks with Pamela Wood of the Baltimore Sun about the recount under way in Hunt Valley in the incredibly tight race for the Democratic nomination for Baltimore County Executive. After the first tally, John Olszewski, Jr. had nine more votes than his closest challenger, Senator Jim Brochin. Pam discusses where things stand with that, and when we may know the results of the County-mandated re-count.  

Today, a conversation about sports, kinda sorta.  Not the World Cup.  Certainly not the Orioles, God help us.  Not the Ravens, who start training camp a week from Thursday, but instead, we’re going to talk about a simple question, that when applied to certain moments and historical realities in sports can lead to some delicious fantasizing.  That question is “What if?” 

What if Billie Jean King had LOST to Bobby Riggs?  What if Richard Nixon had been Good at Football?  What if the Olympics had never dropped Tug of War?  What if Muhammad Ali had GOTTEN his draft deferment?

Mike Pesca has assembled a group of essayists to pose those and other questions in a great and engaging and funny and sometimes profound book called Upon Further Review: The Greatest What-Ifs in Sports History. 

Mike Pesca is the host of The Gist, a podcast on Slate.com.  He’s a former sports reporter at NPR 

 

This conversation with Derek Thompson originally aired on May 25, 2018.  

Today, Tom speaks with Derek Thompson, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about business and technology, and hosts the new podcast Crazy/Genius. He is also the author of Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in the Age of Distraction.

In his best-selling book,  Thompson takes a scientific approach to understanding why certain things in our culture become "cool," at least for a while, and whether or not there are commonalities between them across creative and cultural disciplines. Thompson examines the hidden psychological and market forces that make a song, a movie or a politician popular, and how those forces are constantly reshaping our cultural landscape.

Joshua McKerrow

Today, in this installment of Midday Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parks, the Press and Public Trust.  For three years, since he announced his candidacy for President in 2015, Donald Trump has pounded a steady drumbeat of claims that major news outlets promulgate fake news. A recent poll indicated that 61% of Democrats and 89% of Republicans agree with him. 

Mr. Trump and other political leaders have taken those claims one step further, asserting that the press is the enemy of the people.  Is there a link between that rhetoric and the kind of violence inflicted on the newsroom of the Capital Gazette last week?

Dr. Sheri Parks is the Vice President for Strategic Inititiaves at the Maryland Institute College of Art. She's the author of Fierce Angels: Living With A Legacy From Scared Dark Feminine to Strong Black Woman. 

Tom also talks to Joshua McKerrow, a photographer for the Gazette, and Courtney Radsch, the Advocacy Director for the Committee to Protect Journalists about the violence in Annapolis. 

Associated Press photo

Today, several perspectives on the murders at the Capital Gazette Newspaper.  On Thursday afternoon, a 38 year-old man from Laurel shot five people dead and injured two others at the offices of the Gazette on Bestgate Avenue in Annapolis. 

A little later in the program, WYPR’s Dominique Maria Bonessi will join Tom on the phone with the latest on the investigation into the shooting.  Tom also speaks with security expert  Dr. Keith Williams, vice-president of Support Services at Admiral Security, a company that guards buildings like the one in which the Gazette is located.  We’ll hear from Jamie Costello, an anchor at WMAR 2 News whose own newsroom was attacked a few years ago; from Dr. Paul Nestadt, a clinical psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who studies gun violence; and from Joel Simon of the Committee to Protect Journalists.

But Tom's first guest is Indira Lakshmanan, a columnist for The Boston Globe, who holds the Newmark Chair in Journalism Ethics at the Poynter Institute, an organization that provides training and resources for journalists around the world.

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[It’s Primary Day in MD.  We’ll have complete coverage of the results of today’s election tonight at 9:00, with the WYPR News Team deployed throughout the region at various campaign headquarters, and analysis with Jean Marbella of the Baltimore Sun, John Willis of the University of Baltimore, and political strategist Catalina Byrd.  Tomorrow, we’ll break-down the results with Jayne Miller of WBAL Television and Andy Green of the Baltimore Sun. 

But today on Midday, a little break from politics.  Coming up in just a minute, it’s another installment of Tube Talk.  But before we begin talking some tube, let’s check in with Dominique Maria Bonessi of the WYPR News Team.  She’s at a polling place in Baltimore on this primary day…]

And now, as promised, another installment of Tube Talk Our tube talkers are Bridget Armstrong, producer of Vox.com's pop culture podcast I Think You’re Interestingand Jamyla Krempel, WYPR's digital producer.  They stay in the know about what’s hot and what’s not on TV. 

By day they are mild mannered producers.  By night they are protectors of the pop culture landscape.  For hours, they toil, shrouded under duvets,  their faces bathed in the magical glow of Light Emitting Screen Diodes.  With remotes at the ready, a cup of tea in hand and significant others ignored, forgotten, and shunned, our tenacious tube talkers ingest hours of Television, as a public service, to bring us news and reviews of the good, the bad and the utterly unpalatable.

Archbalt.org

And now, it’s time for The Afro Check-In, a regular feature here on Midday where we sit down with our colleagues at The Afro-American Newspaper to talk about some of the important stories of the day.  

St. Frances Academy is a high school in East Baltimore that over the past few years has become a football powerhouse. Ranked 4th in the country, they finished last season with a perfect 13-0 record and the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association championship.  They’re good.  And now, most of the teams in the MIAA contend that they’re too good, and they’re refusing to play them next season.  

The other Catholic and independent schools in the area frame their decision to take St. Frances off of their schedules as a safety issue.  Others see it as an attempt to isolate the area’s only predominantly Black Catholic school. 

Perry Green joins Tom.  He’s the Sports Editor at The Afro-American Newspaperand he's been following this controversy.

Today's Midday Newsmaker is Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, who joins Tom in Studio A to answer his questions, and yours, for the hour.

Yesterday was the first official day of summer.  Violence in our city, as in cities around the country, sometimes spikes in the summer months.  The Mayor recently announced plans to address that possibility, and she'll discuss the city's continuing violence reduction efforts.  Mayor Pugh also talks about the search for a new police commissioner, a new grant program targeted to locally-driven community development efforts, and city immigration policies. 

A reminder of some great Baltimore events coming up that Tom mentioned during the show:

On Saturday and Sunday, it's the 38th LatinoFest in Patterson Park, a celebration of Baltimore's Hispanic culture, music and art, produced each year by the non-profit Educational-Based Latino Outreach (EBLO).

And this coming Monday, June 25th,  from 6-8pm at the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, you can join Mayor Catherine Pugh for an intimate conversation with Aaron Henkin,  the award-winning co-producer of WYPR's Out of the Blocks  and director of new local programming at WYPR.  It's another in the new series, Conversations with Mayor Catherine Pugh, produced by the Mayor's Office of Special Events.

It's time for another edition of Smart Nutrition with the Nutrition Diva, Monica Reinagel.  If you are looking to improve your eating habits, perhaps the most important first step is to track what you’re eating.    If you are tracking what you eat with an app, the New York Times recently featured four apps that do a good job.  We’ll talk about those. 

A report about one of the most well-known and popular diets out there, the Mediterranean Diet.  It appears that a big study that evaluated the Mediterranean Diet was flawed.  Also, a new study suggests a link between calcium supplements and colon disease.  Lots of folks take calcium supplements.  But how big is the upside of doing so?

Finally, we hear about kids experiencing summer slides, losing ground academically when school is out for the summer.  For lots of kids, summer is also a time when their nutrition habits slide.  Monica has tips about keeping them on track for a healthy hiatus.

Photo Courtesy Flickr

It's the Midday International Newswrap: the President returned to Washington this week after histrionics at the G7 meeting in Canada, and history-making in Singapore.

Mr. Trump had great things to say about North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, and stunningly negative things to say about Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, one of America's greatest allies. Is a denuclearized Korean Peninsula more possible this week than it had been in many months? 

Last month, Valerie Ervin shook up the Democratic primary race for Maryland governor when she announced her candidacy to replace her former running mate, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who died suddenly on May 10th.  Yesterday, Ms. Ervin shook up the Democratic gubernatorial race for the second time, when she announced her withdrawal from the contest, and her decision to support Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker in his primary bid to challenge Governor Larry Hogan in the general election in November.

Valerie Ervin joins Tom Hall on the line from Silver Spring to discuss her recent moves, and how they might impact the Democratic race to win back the Statehouse.

In this installment of Conversations with the Candidates, Tom Hall is joined in the studio by Sheldon Laskin, a Democratic candidate for the Senate in Maryland’s 11th district, which includes Pikesville, Owings Mills, and Hunt Valley in northwest Baltimore County. 

Photo Courtesy Flickr

 

Today, on Midday, a conversation about the Foster Care System.  Nearly 430,000 children and young people are currently in the care of foster families.  About 112,000 of them are hoping to be adopted permanently.  And for the young people who “age out” of the system on their 18th or 21st birthdays, the challenges are daunting, and the statistics are devastating.

Only three to four percent of young people who are foster care alumni earn a college degree by the age of 26.  One in five will experience homelessness.  Only half will be employed.  7 of 10 female foster youth will become pregnant by the time they are 21, and one in four foster youth will experience PTSD.

Tom’s guests include Shalita O’Neale, Founder and Executive Director of the Fostering Change Network.  Fostering Change is producing a conference this weekend at Johns Hopkins Medicine to connect people in the system with resources and networking opportunities.

And joining us on the line from the studios of NPR in Washington is Jelani Freeman.  Like Shalita O’Neale, he is a product of the foster care system.  He is an attorney who serves as a court appointed special advocate for foster children in Washington, and he sits on the board of the Center for Adoption Support and Education.

We will also hear testimony from Luigi Kramer, a 22 year old college student and foster care alum who has recently transitioned out of the system; and Lisa Phillips an entrepreneur and alum who was  taken into care in the 1980’s. 

Photo Courtesy Flickr

 

On today’s, edition of Midday Culture Connections with Dr. Sheri Parkswe examine some of the stories making headlines across the country.

We begin to with a look at the cognitive effects of violent video games and the Military’s stake in the multi-billion dollar industry of gaming.  Following the deadly May 18th shooting at Santa Fe High School, Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick cited violent video games as a contributing factor to the national epidemic of deadly violence and apathy in our culture, reigniting the debate on the psychological effects of violent video games on our children, specifically young boys. 

Serena Williams returned to the French Open last week after 14 months of maternity leave. In keeping with WTA policy, the former world number one entered into the grand slam tournament unseeded.  Serena’s experience has many questioning not only the WTA’s policies towards new mothers; but also, the broader politics of women and pregnancy in the workplace.

Finally, the Trumpian era has been marked by political tension, social tumult and temerarious tweets.   It is an era of fraught with class and racial division, violent identity politics and targeted attacks on the media.  These deep societal fissures came to a head this week, as comediennes Samantha Bee and Roseanne Barr became the mascots for America’s new ‘culture wars’ . 

Dr. Sheri Parks is the Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at the Maryland Institute College of Art, and a regular contributor to our show on Midday Culture Connections.  She’s the author of Fierce Angels: Living with a Legacy from the Sacred Dark Feminine to the Strong Black Woman.

Today on Midday, a conversation about race, and corporate culture. 

Last Wednesday, the NFL announced that they would ban players from kneeling on the field during the national anthem, and that they teams would face fines if any players chose to do so. 

On Tuesday, ABC cancelled the reboot of the popular 90’s sitcom “Roseanne” following racist tweets by the program’s star Roseanne Barr. 

While Barr was getting boot, 175,000 Starbucks employees were engaged in racial bias training, as the company closed 8,000 locations following an incident in Philadelphia in which two African American men were arrested for...well, being in Starbucks.   How is institutional racism and racial bias confronted in the corporate world?

Tom is joined by Dr. Kimberly Moffitt is an associate professor of American Studies and affiliate assistant professor of Africana Studies and Language, Literacy and Culture at the University of MD Baltimore County.  

Michael Fletcher is a senior writer at the Undefeated, ESPN’s online platform that explores the intersection of race, culture and sports.  He is a former national economics reporter for the Washington Post..  

And on the phone, Milton Kent, the host of Sports at Large here on WYPR, and a lecturer in the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Morgan State University. 

Creative Commons photo

It's Midday: The Afro-Check In, a regular feature where we sit down with our colleagues at the Baltimore-Afro American Newspapers to talk about some important local news developments.  

This week: grief and racial tension on both sides of the City/County line as the death of Baltimore County Police Officer Amy Caprio, and the subsequent charges handed down to four Baltimore City teens, have unleashed a torrent of political mudslinging and racially charged bitterness. 

Also, with early voting in the Maryland primaries a little more than two weeks away, tensions continue to simmer between the campaign of gubernatorial candidate Valerie Ervin and the Maryland State Board of Elections, over the Board's decision not to provide updated ballots printed with the names and new candidacies of Ms. Ervin and her running mate, Marisol Johnson. 

Joining Tom here in Studio A:  Sean Yoes, the Baltimore Editor of The Afro-American Newspapers, and host of the podcast, Afro First Edition.  Sean is also the co-host of a new podcast that has its home here at WYPR:  Truth and Reconciliation.

Photo courtesy U. of Pennsylvania

This program originally aired on March 28, 2018 .

Today on the show, a conversation with Dr. Mary Frances Berry.  She is a scholar, an author and activist whose new book chronicles the history of American protest and resistance movements, from the Roosevelt administration through the Obama years.

From the Vietnam War to the end of apartheid in South Africa, to her long tenure on the U.S. Civil Rights Commission that spanned several administrations, Dr. Berry brings deep experience and erudition to her fascinating book.  It’s called History Teaches Us to Resist: How Progressive Movements Have Succeeded in Challenging Times.  

Today, Tom speaks with Derek Thompson, a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about business and technology, and hosts the new podcast Crazy/Genius.  He is also the author of  Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in the Age of Distraction.   

In his book -- which happens to be a best-seller -- Thompson takes a scientific approach to understanding why certain things in our culture become "cool," at least for a while, and whether or not there are commonalities between them across creative and cultural disciplines.  Thompson examines the hidden psychological and market forces that make a song, a movie or a politician popular, and how those forces are constantly reshaping our cultural landscape.  

Today, we continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates  who will be on the June 26th primary ballot here in Maryland.

Tom’s guest today is Valerie Ervin.  She is one of nine Democrats running for Governor this June.  The winner will go up against Republican Gov. Larry Hogan in the general election in November. 

Last week, the former Montgomery County Councilwoman announced that she would be taking the place of her former running mate, the late Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, as a Democratic candidate for Governor.  She is the second woman, and one of four African Americans running for Governor in the Democratic primary. 

Ervin’s career includes politics, education and labor advocacy.  She was the first African American woman to serve on the Montgomery County Council where she served two terms; she was only the 2nd African American woman to serve on the Montgomery County Board of Education. 

Her running mate is Marisol Johnson, former Baltimore County school board Vice Chair.  She is the first Latina to hold public office in Baltimore County. 

Valerie Ervin also took your questions, emails and tweets.  Like all of Midday’s Conversations with the Candidates, this program was streamed live on the WYPR FB page.  Check out the video here

Friends of Rushern Baker III

Today, we continue our series of Conversations with the Candidates who will be on the June 26th primary ballot here in Maryland. 

Yesterday, former Montgomery County Councilwoman Valerie Ervin entered the Democratic primary race for Maryland governor, following the sudden passing of Baltimore County Executive and gubernatorial candidate Kevin Kamenetz, with whom she'd been running as a candidate forLieutenant Governor. 

We begin the program with WYPR's Baltimore County politics reporter, John Leeand his analysis of the changing dynamics of the governor's race.  

Tom’s guest for the balance of the hour is Prince George’s County Executive Rushern Baker III, also a Democratic candidate for Maryland governor. 

Rushern Baker is one of three candidates in the race who is not a political outsider, and now, the only one currently serving as a county executive.  Baker entered politics in 1994, serving in the Maryland House of Delegates until 2003.  He lost his first two elections for Prince George's county executive, but in 2010, he beat incumbent Jack Johnson.  Soon after that election, federal prosecutors arrested Johnson on corruption charges.  Mr. Baker has been widely credited with improving the county’s image and ending its “pay to play” legacy.

Photo Courtesy Kevin Kamenetz for Maryland

Few events in recent MD history were as shocking or disruptive to the political landscape as the death of Kevin Kamenetz last week, from a heart attack. The 60 year old Baltimore County Executive was one of the leading contenders in the crowded field of hopefuls vying for the chance to run against incumbent Governor Larry Hogan in November.

With just a month until early voting starts in the primary, candidates are scrambling to assess the new and uncertain dynamics of the race. Will Valerie Ervin, Kamenetz’s running mate in the primary, choose to run herself, and if so, with whom? Will she run at the top of a newly formed ticket, or will she maintain her position in the Lieutenant Governor slot?

Kamenetz’s death also occasions many questions about the future of Baltimore County. Three Democrats and two Republicans are running in their respective primaries to face-off for the County’s top job in the fall. In the meantime, who will the County Council appoint to serve-out the remainder of Kevin Kamenetz’s term?

Today on Midday, Tom explores these and other questions with Pamela Wood, who covers Baltimore County government and politics for the Baltimore Sun; and Bryan Sears , government reporter for the Daily Record.

Photo Courtesy Baltimore Ceasefire 365

Over this past ceasefire weekend, the City saw 72 hours pass with two reported shootings, and one alleged case of first degree child abuse.  The event, which was intentionally scheduled to coincide with Mother’s Day, is the second ceasefire event with no homicides from gun violence. 

Tom is joined  in Studio A by Baltimore Ceasefire 365 Co-Founder, Erricka Bridgeford.   Erricka joined us this past February after the first Ceasefire event with zero homicides.   That ceasefire continued on for a record breaking 12 consecutive days without a murder in Baltimore City.

Photo Courtesy Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

Tonight and this weekend at the Meyerhoff, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is screening Steven Spielberg's classic 1981 adventure film, Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark, and performing  composer John Williams' popular score for it.  Weilding the baton will be BSO Pops conductor, Jack Everly, who joins Tom in the studio with a preview of the BSO's latest Movies with Orchestra event.

In a career spanning more than 50 years, composer John Williams has created a vast catalog of music for screen, stage, symphony and sport.  He's garnered 51 Academy Award nominations for his memorable film scores including the aforementioned Raiders as well as Jaws, Jurassic Park, Superman, Star Wars, three of the Harry Potter films and Schindler's List.  

For this weekend's  Movies with Orchestra ticket information, click on the link below: 

https://www.bsomusic.org/calendar/events/2017-2018-events/movie-with-orchestra-raiders-of-the-lost-ark/

Baltimore County Executive's Office

We begin the show today with reflections on the life and career of Kevin Kamenetz, a fixture on the Maryland political scene for more than two decades.

Mr. Kamenetz died early Thursday morning from a heart attack.

He began his career in public service as a prosecutor in the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s office. He was first elected to the Baltimore County Council in 1994. He served four terms, before being elected as the County Executive in 2010. He was considered a leading candidate in the crowded field of people running for the Democratic nomination for Governor. He is survived by his wife Jill, and their two teenage sons, Karson and Dylan. Our hearts ache for them. Kevin Kamenetz was 60 years old.

Joining Tom on the line to remember Mr. Kamenetz are Donald Mohler III, who was a close friend of Mr. Kamenetz and served as his chief of staff in the County Executive’s Office, Congressman Dutch Ruppersberger, who served as Baltimore County Executive from 1994 to 2002, and Jim Smith, who preceded Kamenetz as Baltimore County Executive. He currently serves as the Chief of Strategic Alliances in the office of Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh.

Photo courtesy Baltimore City Public Schools

On today’s show, Tom is joined Dr. Sonja Santelises, the CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools.   As the City School Board considers the budget for the 2018-19 school year, we discuss some of the provisions within the proposal.  This budget does not call for any teacher layoffs, but does call for cuts to Charter Schools.  There is an increase in literacy coaching, and the overall budget has been developed to combat  shrinking enrollment, a persistent problem that speaks to the larger challenges of the city in attracting and keeping young families.

This conversation was streamed live on Facebook.  You can check out the video by clicking on the link below:

https://www.facebook.com/WYPR881FM/videos/10156434271953980/

 

Photo Courtesy AP News

It’s Midday Culture Connections with Dr Sheri Parks.  Today, we examine the mini-firestorms that have erupted over the past week surrounding journalist, a comedian and a rapper. 

Kanye West set the Twittersphere alight with a series of pro-Trump tweets that led more than a few people to question the rapper’s mental health, and even challenge his “Blackness.”

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